Harnessing the Internet to Realise...

Do internet campaigns work? This is what Alexandra Demetrianova reflects upon in her research for GISWatch about labour rights violations in garment factories of Cambodia. The internet has played a key role in the struggles of garment factory workers (mostly female) and trade unionists to demand for an increase in their minimum wage. It has also helped change consumer consciousness across the world. Some things cost more than we realise.
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Radhika Radhakrishnan

I recently quit a job in IT to pursue gender studies and research. Sex positive, liberal, pro-...

Role of internet in realising sexual...

In this interview, Allana Kembabazi of Initiative Social And Economic Rights in Uganda, talks about the role of the internet in advocacy and campaigns about high rates of maternal mortality in Uganda and sexual and reproductive rights. In a context where health care is far from sufficient, the internet also becomes an avenue for provision of sexual and reproductive health related information that is not easily accessible otherwise.
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Tarryn Booysen

Tarryn is a South African BA graduate with majors in Psychology and Sociology. She currently works...

Algorithmic discrimination and the...

Global data volume has grown exponentially in recent years and experts expect this trend to continue. The wider trend towards the pervasive datafication of our lives is not one we can just sit out. Big data and the algorithmic decisions it feeds permeate citizenship, healthcare, welfare states, education, finance, law enforcement as well as the ways in which we shop, travel, and live our social lives. They can take on a benign air of innovation and efficiency but also carry an intrinsic baggage of surveillance and control.
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Dr. Nicole Shephard

Dr. Nicole Shephard is a researcher and writer interested in the gender and tech nexus,...

Beyond the offline-online binary – why...

The non-territorial, transborder Internet has added layers of complexity to the human rights debate. The idea of substantive equality – a compass for human rights and the key to gender justice – must be interpreted anew and afresh, as the force of digital technologies complicates the nature of social relations and institutions. The easy binary divisions of online and offline cease to make sense in an increasingly digitised world.
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Anita Gurumurthy

For over 15 years, Anita Gurumurthy has been working with feminist theory and practice on network...

In Search of Allies: Interview with...

In this set of interviews, Smita Vanniyar speaks to Japleen Pasricha of Feminism in India, and Divya Rajgopal of WhyHate. In separate ways, both these are projects of passion that find ways to reclaim technology for women and also others marginalised on account of gender non-conformity, sexuality, caste, religion and class. They discuss the pros and cons of anonymity, how to address online VAW and how to raise issues that are difficult and troublesome.
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Smita

Smita is a queer feminist, currently working at Point of View, India, on gender, sexuality and...

Technology as lingua franca: Interview...

A detailed conversation with activist and writer Caroline Tagny on the various campaigns that she has been part of with Take Back the Tech. The interviewer, Bianca Baldo, focuses on the politics of language in these various campaigns and the importance of content in local language to connect to and bring together people and movements. The role of French as both a language of the colonial oppressor and a common language in countries in West and Central Africa and parts of Canada has particularly played out in these campaigns.
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Bianca Baldo

Bianca Baldo has over eight years of coordination experience in women human rights and anti human-...