Being Dalit, Doing Corporate (Women-in-...

Multinational companies often put in place a policy for diversity and inclusiveness at the workplace, but does this guarantee the everyday, actual practice of accepting people from marginalized communities, and especially women from such communities. In this article, Christina Thomas Dhanaraj, examines what it means to be Dalit in corporate India - the continued invisibilising of caste, sexism and gender inequity and the effectiveness (or not) of diversity policies.
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Christina Thomas Dhanaraj

Christina Thomas Dhanaraj is a 3rd generation Christian Dalit woman from Bangalore, India. She...

Educating, Hiring, and Retaining Women...

Research suggests that women are underrepresented at every level in technology(McKinsey survey, 2016). Why is this the case? And how do we educate, hire, and retain more women in it? In this article, Radhika Radhakrishnan highlights the underlying realities that women face in technology beyond just a numbers game, and offer insight to such questions by interviewing diverse, pioneering women working in various aspects of the field.
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Radhika Radhakrishnan

I recently quit a job in IT to pursue gender studies and research. Sex positive, liberal, pro-...

Ten facts about your computer: Health,...

This article takes a look at where our hardware comes from, the electronics factories situated in primarily Asian countries, and the challenges facing the people, primarily women, who work there, and the issues that impact upon women workers in the electronics industry. Ten facts about your computer that illuminate the gendered nature of the labour that is embedded in our hardware.
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Sonia Randhawa

"Sonia Randhawa is a member of GenderIT.org's pool of writer. She is a director of the...

The Architectures of Online Harassment...

In this two part report on a workshop on thinking through online harassment, Maya Ganesh of Tactical Technology Collective teases out the nuances of how online harassment takes place, technologically and socially. The article looks at what troubles and concerns us about online harassment of women, and what could be the possible new directions opened up by using a design-thinking approach. Part 2 of the article will unpack further the design-thinking model.
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ItsAllMaya

Maya Ganesh is Applied Research Director at Tactical Tech in Berlin and leads the organisation...

A painting of an African feminist...

Addressing the internet gender divide in Africa can only be achieved through the deliberate creation of a feminist internet, and this was affirmed by the Gender and Internet Governance eXchange (gigX) workshop that was held on 10 October 2016 in Durban. We need a feminist internet that works to empower all of us in our diversities, creates equal power relations, and dismantles patriarchy in all of its forms.
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Irene Kagoya

Irene has been working with leadership programs for women since graduating from university in 2005...

‘There’s someone else just like you’:...

Asexuality is often dismissed as experience or identity, even by those within the medical community. However in recent times the internet has played a valuable role in both affirming the choices of those who identify as asexual, and in building networks of support and conversation. Given that it is still very difficult to speak openly about any sexuality in most physical spaces in India, the internet is the only place where digitally-connected asexual people or aces can safely (and anonymously) speak about their experiences.
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Shreya Ila Anasuya

Shreya is an independent writer and activist. She is a part-time digital editor for Point of View...