Online privacy through a gendered lens...

The ever-growing advancement of information technology is not without perils. Online privacy has been at stake for a while now. Looking at online privacy through a gendered lens reveals that women are particularly vulnerable because of social, economic and cultural factors. Farhana Akhter looks at the specifics of the law and context in Bangladesh especially the increasing incidents of online violence, illegal surveillance along with legally sanctioned surveillance by the government.
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Farhana Akter

Farhana Akter has been working as Programme Coordinator for VOICE since 2005. She had previously...

Reshaping the Internet for Women

Even in 2015 the contribution by women to Wikipedia, one of the largest repositories online of organised knowledge about the world, had not reached 25% of the total. Most of the content online comes from the global North, specifically from white male contributors in North America. What needs to be done to ensure diversity, localisation and gender parity in content online? APCNews speaks to Anasuya Sengupta and Siko Bouterse from Whose Knowledge? project to find out more.
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Flavia Fascendini

Flavia Fascendini vive en una ciudad en el interior de Argentina y es directora de comunicaciones...

[COLUMN] Finding solutions: Using ICTs...

In her fourth column, Sonia Randhawa looks at whether ICTs can play a role in finding solutions to climate change. However while ICTs seem like an ideal technology for building networks and connections between people, it remains out of reach for most people, especially women who are often at the forefront of struggles in relation to climate change. Community radio is far more accessible for disenfranchised and marginalised groups, and those in the global South who now have to contend with the impact of climate change.
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Sonia Randhawa

"Sonia Randhawa is a member of GenderIT.org's pool of writer. She is a director of the...

Beyond the offline-online binary – why...

The non-territorial, transborder Internet has added layers of complexity to the human rights debate. The idea of substantive equality – a compass for human rights and the key to gender justice – must be interpreted anew and afresh, as the force of digital technologies complicates the nature of social relations and institutions. The easy binary divisions of online and offline cease to make sense in an increasingly digitised world.
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Anita Gurumurthy

For over 15 years, Anita Gurumurthy has been working with feminist theory and practice on network...

ESC rights, gender and internet:...

The GISWatch report 2016 looks at the link between economic, social, cultural (ESC) rights and the internet in several countries, and from a multitude of systems of governance, whether that of socialism and the welfare state, or the semi-functional welfare schemes in parts of Asia and Africa (Uganda, Cambodia), and even the relatively privileged parts of the world, like Spain. Here is a synthesis of the reports that deal with gender, sexual orientation, sexuality and women human rights defenders.
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Namita

Namita is a writer and legal researcher. She divides her time between Bengaluru in India and the...

Harnessing the Internet to Realise...

Do internet campaigns work? This is what Alexandra Demetrianova reflects upon in her research for GISWatch about labour rights violations in garment factories of Cambodia. The internet has played a key role in the struggles of garment factory workers (mostly female) and trade unionists to demand for an increase in their minimum wage. It has also helped change consumer consciousness across the world. Some things cost more than we realise.
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Radhika Radhakrishnan

I recently quit a job in IT to pursue gender studies and research. Sex positive, liberal, pro-...