Gender Equity

[COLUMN] Open software movements, open content, free culture: Where are the women?

Evelin Heidel - Scann on 18 Apr 2017
The gender balance is far from equal even in progressive movements such as the free and open source software community, Mozilla user groups, and others. Despite all the rivers of ink that were written about the gender imbalance in these areas, the changes are slow to arrive.

[COLUMN] I want to be a Pokémon master

Angélica Contreras on 13 Apr 2017
Pokémon exploded as a game that could be played on mobile phones in 2016. Of the many debates around it, Angélica Contreras explores the gendered aspect of videogames and how Pokémon struck a chord with many women in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and parts of Latin America. This article was originally written in Spanish, and is part of a column series that explores young women and their lives immersed in technology.

[COLUMN] Access and beyond: Navigating the gendered cyberspace

Chenai Chair on 12 Apr 2017
In this column series, Chenai Chair explores the barriers to accessing the internet in four countries in Africa - Rwanda, Nigeria, South Africa and Kenya. The study in particular looks at the impact of affordability of internet and subsidised data services, and what impact this has on people in different locations (countries, urban-rural), of different genders, and so on. In the first column, Chenai examines what kind of methodology is suited for research on access.

The nerdiest and most open of them all: Internet Freedom Festival 2017

Smita on 7 Apr 2017
The Internet Freedom Festival is refreshingly different from most forums around internet rights and technology - it is almost equal in gender ratio, welcoming of gender non conforming and trans persons, and takes privacy of its participants at the venue seriously. Smita Vanniyar tells us more about their experience at the festival this year in Valencia, Spain.

A Woman Coder's Journey (Women-in-tech)

GenderIT.org on 23 Feb 2017
Judith Owigar speaks about her journey entering into tech spaces, and also about their work with Akirachix in Kenya helping other women along the same journey marked by trials, exclusions and success. While speaking about the barriers of education in science and technology (STEM), she says that what inspires her work in many forums around women in tech in Africa, is that eventually a woman should have the space to make her own choices.

Being Dalit, Doing Corporate (Women-in-tech)

Multinational companies often put in place a policy for diversity and inclusiveness at the workplace, but does this guarantee the everyday, actual practice of accepting people from marginalized communities, and especially women from such communities. In this article, Christina Thomas Dhanaraj, examines what it means to be Dalit in corporate India - the continued invisibilising of caste, sexism and gender inequity and the effectiveness (or not) of diversity policies.

Ten facts about your computer: Health, hardware and the toll on women

Sonia Randhawa on 21 Feb 2017
This article takes a look at where our hardware comes from, the electronics factories situated in primarily Asian countries, and the challenges facing the people, primarily women, who work there, and the issues that impact upon women workers in the electronics industry. Ten facts about your computer that illuminate the gendered nature of the labour that is embedded in our hardware.

A painting of an African feminist internet

Irene Kagoya on 9 Feb 2017
Addressing the internet gender divide in Africa can only be achieved through the deliberate creation of a feminist internet, and this was affirmed by the Gender and Internet Governance eXchange (gigX) workshop that was held on 10 October 2016 in Durban. We need a feminist internet that works to empower all of us in our diversities, creates equal power relations, and dismantles patriarchy in all of its forms.

Defining their place: Gender at the Internet Governance Forum 2016

Smita on 18 Jan 2017
The Internet Governance Forum has been valuable as a multistakeholder space that facilitates the discussion and dialogue of public policy issues pertaining to the Internet. Over the years several feminists, activists and others interested in diverse representation have been participating in IGF and observing how concerns related to gender, sexuality, and the internet are raised and addressed. Smita Vanniyar writes a short report on IGF 2016 in Guadalajara, Mexico, and how gender and sexuality are still largely a concern for the women activists and queer people present, rather than for all.

[COLUMN] Taking action: Making climate justice and climate action a reality

Sonia Randhawa on 12 Jan 2017
In the final column on gender, ICTs and climate change, Sonia Randhawa explores what are the possible actions that individuals can take -- in the face of impending climate change and the devastating and inequitable effect it has on people. At an individual level, we can reduce our carbon footprint. We also need to get involved in the climate movement. The climate emergency is with us now, and we need to mobilise to ensure that it forces a better world, rather than a continuation of injustice and reinforcing of inequality.

ESC rights, gender and internet: Learnings from the GISWatch report

Namita on 7 Dec 2016
The GISWatch report 2016 looks at the link between economic, social, cultural (ESC) rights and the internet in several countries, and from a multitude of systems of governance, whether that of socialism and the welfare state, or the semi-functional welfare schemes in parts of Asia and Africa (Uganda, Cambodia), and even the relatively privileged parts of the world, like Spain. Here is a synthesis of the reports that deal with gender, sexual orientation, sexuality and women human rights defenders.

[READING LIST] Gender, Race, Sexuality and Surveillance

Dr. Nicole Shephard on 28 Oct 2016
This reading list provides an overview of recent books, articles and sources across the internet for those interested in learning more about how race, gender, and sexuality relate to surveillance. Far from comprehensive, it offers a starting point to explore how an intersectional lens and feminist attention to state, corporate, and peer surveillance practices and their differential effects on marginalised groups is timely and important.

[COLUMN] Joining the dots: Labour, sustainability, resilience in gender and climate change

Sonia Randhawa on 17 Oct 2016
What is the connection between labour unions, women workers and climate change? This monthly column on connecting the dots between climate change and gender, explores the exploitative conditions that are still prevalent in the electronics industry. While workers in Pearl River delta in China may no longer face sweatshop conditions, the production has shifted to other poorer parts and most often to women workers.

Mapping the feminist internet: the Whose Knowledge? campaign at the AWID Forum

Siko Bouterse on 3 Oct 2016
Whose Knowledge? works with individuals, communities, organisations and movements worldwide to create, collect and curate knowledge from and with marginalised communities, particularly women, people of colour, LGBTQI communities, indigenous peoples and others from the global South. Essentially, Whose Knowledge? is a radical re-imagining and reconstruction of the internet, so that the internet can truly be from and for us all.

Beyond the Numbers: Gender and Access to the Internet

Lisa Garcia on 19 Aug 2016
Access is a right. In June this year, the United Nations Human Rights Council passed a resolution that condemns "measures to intentionally prevent or disrupt access to or dissemination of information online" and affirmed that "the same rights that people have offline must also be protected online." But what does access really mean? How important is it to women, especially to marginalized women?
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