online exposure

The internet of Things: smart devices, quantified self, dolls and vibrators

hvale on 27 Apr 2017
If an object has a chip, it becomes smart, and by extension our houses become smarter - and so do our cities, hospitals, toys, phones. But what about the inventors, the creators, the owners, the users of all these smart and tiny things - are we becoming smarter? Reflecting on sessions in Rights Con 2017 in Brussels, Vale examines the ways in which the internet of things can lead to invasive datafication and surveillance, and violate internet rights.

Unscripting Harassment (Part 2)

ItsAllMaya on 14 Mar 2017
Online harassment has taken various forms on the internet, including doxxing, intimate violence, stalking and so on. In this article, Part 2 of the series, Maya Ganesh explores a different way of thinking through this contemporary phenomenon by using an approach that emphasises 'design-thinking'. Possibilities that are explored include whether the system or platform can predict or respond to interactions that are escalating. However we also need to acknowledge that design, no matter how good, cannot solve social problems or harassment, but can be part of how we deal with it.

Feminist politics of freedom of speech - Reflections on session in AWID 2016

hvale on 8 Oct 2016
The discourse on technology related violence against women is often pulled into debate vis-a-vis freedom of expression. This article attempts to unpack the possibility of looking at this debate different - to articulate what is the feminist politics of free speech. Does it go beyond the protection of the right as currently imagined, to open up the possibilities of those who are marginalized, excluded and victims of violence also getting to exercise their right to free speech.

Rape and the courts: Going online isn't really justice

Sonia Randhawa on 12 Aug 2012
Savannah Dietrich was raped. The rapists took photographs and circulated them at her school - but in a plea bargain, she was told that she was not allowed to tell people what had happened. She posted the names of her attackers on social media sites, risking a jail sentence and a fine. But is this justice?
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