Cultural Diversity and Language

A is for Agency

Nadine Moawad on 10 Jul 2013
It’s been a great month for cyber-feminism. The #FBrape campaign succeeded in changing the social network giant’s policies on violence against women in record time. The global alarm over the NSA surveillance scandal created mass awareness over privacy and access to personal data. And Instagram launched hipster filters for videos. Perhaps not as breakthrough, but definitely encouraging of more targeted filming and documentation. In its first phase, EROTICS generated a unique body of knowledge about the negotiations and navigations of internet regulation around sexuality content in five different countries. The case studies looked at usage, access, activism, identity and other fascinating components that highlight our relationship with cyberspace as sexual rights activists. As we move into the next phase, EROTICS II, the team is hoping to build on the learning to advance global mechanisms of support that amplify that work that different groups and networks are taking on locally.

Baseline study: Violence against women and gender based harassment in context of ICT penetration in Pakistan

Flavia Fascendini on 5 Apr 2013
This report is intended to provide insight into the use of ICT tools as a means of women empowerment, aiming to dissect their use in facilitating women in realising leadership roles in society. The report is meant primarily to tackle the issues of ‘Violence against women’ (VAW) and ‘Gender based cyber harassment’ in Pakistan, and to address these issues by holding a discourse on the use of ICTs as tools for the betterment of this condition – by enabling and positioning women in roles where they can proactively work towards such a goal themselves.

Copyright? Copyleft? Why does it matter? An interview with Heather Ford

Mavic Cabrera-Balleza on 2 Jun 2010
GenderIt writer Mavic Cabrera-Balleza interviewed Heather Ford, Founder of the African Commons Project, a South African NGO with the goal of mobilizing communities through active participation in collaborative technology. Ford has worked in the fields of internet policy, law and management in South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States. She sheds light on some of these issues.

Challenges of communal copyright: Traditional and indigenous knowledge

Sonia Randhawa on 2 Jun 2010
Copyright and patents legislation has spread rapidly over the past century. This has a particular impact on indigenous women and the holders of traditional knowledge, as copyright ignores the possibility that knowledge can be held communally and has definitions of knowledge that exclude information held in a spiritual context. In this article, GenderIT writer Sonia Randhawa examines how women's lives in traditional and indigenous societies have been affected by the spread of copyright.

Content, Contingencies and Conflict on the Internet

Cecilia Gordano on 2 Jun 2010
As both a mirror and an extension of social relationships, the internet’s virtual space differentiates itself from traditional media by its decentralised and open architecture. This subverts power relationships between citizens, institutions, governments and markets. Confusion. Impunity. Unbounded freedom. Can and should this anthill be organised? What is the ethical reach of doing so? This article proposes to take up some of the important issues regarding the content that circulates through the network. To this end, this article presents the qualified opinion of two Uruguayan professionals from government and academia.

GenderIT en español: A brand new portal catalyses women’s voices in political sphere

erika on 2 Jun 2010
Exactly one year after the successful introduction of GenderIT.org - the gender and information and communication technology (ICT) Policy Monitor in English - the APC WNSP now presents GenderIT en español, the Spanish counterpart of the monitor with original resources and coverage in Spanish, as well as in Portuguese.

Africa Grassroot Caucus prioritise the WSIS and MDGs as part of development

Brenda Zulu on 2 Jun 2010
Africa Grassroots Caucus has prioritised the World Summit on Information Society (WSIS) and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as part of development. This was the outcome of the second Grassroots Caucus Regional Consultation that took place in Lusaka, Zambia on 26-28 July 2005. The participants from Kenya, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Congo Brazzaville and the Democratic Republic of Congo addressed the serious omission of non-representation of grassroots issues in the WSIS Action Plan, and highlighted health, livelihood, education and environment to be the priorities in the ground. Gender, culture and traditional access to information were identified as cross-cutting themes.

Where is women´s “J” spot?

María Suárez Toro on 2 Jun 2010
As the international community prepares to join the United Nation’s 49th Session of the Commission on the Status on Women (CSW), women media practitioners are asking: where is women’s “J” spot? Despite the fact that the latform for Action (PFA) contemplates Section “J” in Chapter 3, about Women and Media, the issue is hardly found in the provisional agenda for the evaluation process. The U.N. Division for the Advancement of Women (DAW) has also ignored “Women and media” in its web page discussion topics towards the process.

African Copyright & Access to Knowledge Project

GenderIT.org on 2 Jun 2010
The African Copyright & Access to Knowledge (ACA2K) Project examines the relationship between national copyright environments and access to knowledge in African countries. The project is probing this relationship within an access to knowledge (A2K) framework - a framework which regards the protection/promotion of user access as one of the central objectives of copyright law. The project works in eight countries, Eygpt, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Mozambique, Senegal, South Africa and Uganda.

Gender dimensions of intellectual property and traditional medical knowledge

Jac sm Kee on 2 Jun 2010
This paper examines the discussion on intellectual property rights (IP) for traditional knowledge (TK) in medicine from a gender perspective. It argues that a gender analysis of these issues adds to the understanding of how trade decisions can have important and unintended impacts on the lives of disempowered people.

Francophone Women's Groups in Minority Situations and ICTs

GenderIT.org on 2 Jun 2010
“Francophone women are less likely to use the internet than Anglophone women (40.4% compared with 55.3%, respectively)" says a survey report released lately on the Womyn's Voices website. In the spring of 2002, 50 women’s groups working in minority situations in Canada were surveyed on the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). The project's scope is limited, looking at Francophone women’s groups working in minority situations. Also since statistics tend to change rapidly, especially concerning ICTs, the data presented may not be an accurate account of today's reality. It remains a valuable assessment for APC, not only for better understanding its current projects and members in francophone Africa and Canada, but also in preparing its new website in French.

Radio: A Post Nine-Eleven Strategy for Reaching the World's Poor

GenderIT.org on 2 Jun 2010
The book provides case studies of the historical use of radio, and an overview of what is being done today. the authors argue that the voice of radio can work as an effective, practical and cost-efficient means of transmitting information that may impact the lives of people in communities all over the world.

Women in Sync: Acting Locally, Connecting Globally (Toolkit 3)

Daphne Sabanes Plou on 2 Jun 2010
Connecting Locally, Acting Globally is the third volume of Women in Sync. Women from diverse geographies and cultures tell how their communities are defining the Internet, and how they are themselves redefined by the experience. The telling comes in different tones: some voices were are terse, some verbosevoluble, and some quietly passionate. But all are, in the end, inspiring.<br />

MEDIA BRIEF: Cultivating Violence Through Technology? Exploring the Connections between Internet Communication Technologies and Violence Against Women

Jac sm Kee on 2 Jun 2010
This brief is a condensed version of the issue paper with the same title written by Jac sm Kee for APC WNSP. The paper explores the connection between new information communication technologies (ICTs) and violence against women (VAW). From the perspective of representation and rapid dissemination of information and communication enabled through ICTs, the paper looks at domestic violence in the homes, sexual violence and women in conflict affected areas. It presents case studies, strategies and analysis on these different areas.

Cultivating Violence Through Technology? Exploring the Connections between Internet Communication Technologies (ICT) and Violence Against Women (VAW)

Jac sm Kee on 2 Jun 2010
This paper explores the connection between new information communication technologies (ICTs) and violence against women (VAW). From the perspective of representation and rapid dissemination of information and communication enabled through ICTs, the paper looks at domestic violence in the homes, sexual violence and women in conflict affected areas. It presents case studies, strategies and analysis on these different areas. The study is the part of APC WNSP issue papers series on ICTs for women's rights.<br /> <br /> <br />
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