communication rights

How technology issues impact women’s rights: 10 points on Section J

APC on 9 Mar 2015
APC's advocacy for the re-prioritisation of Section J at the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women asks governments to recognise the critical role that the media and ICT play in both advancing and stifling women's rights. At the same time, it is vital that women's rights activists and organisations examine how ICT affects their work and take up Section J demands. To that end, 10 Points on Section J describes ICT's growing impact on a variety of issues related to women's rights, from access and agency to economics and ecology. Learn more about each of the 10 issues and related demands and draw on this resource as you work to inject gender equality into all aspects of media and technology, increasing women's ability to fully enjoy their rights online and off.

Gender dynamics need to be addressed in communications surveillance in Uganda

Flavia Fascendini on 4 Dec 2014
The incident involving the prime minister highlights why there is growing concern over the governance and regulation of communication surveillance, and how it is being used to infringe on one’s right to privacy in Uganda. Because this case affected a high-ranking Ugandan official, the question is, how safe is the ordinary Ugandan? And from a gender activist perspective, what are the gender concerns in the emerging policy and regulatory environment? Two recent studies on internet freedoms in Uganda were conducted by Unwanted Witness and Collaboration on International ICT Policy in East and Southern Africa (CIPESA). While both studies review the communications surveillance environment in Uganda, there is no specific focus on issues of concern by gender. However, both studies did raise various concerns that are relevant to women’s use of the internet and social media.

More or less equal. How digital platforms can help advance communication rights

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 13 Nov 2014
Interestingly, in this same publication there are five articles on communication, gender and women’s use of media (including the internet) to freely review and publicize their reality in a world where roles and gender expectations are being transformed at a steadily increasing pace. Communication rights exercised by women allow them to enter a world that has long been considered private and which now, through the use of new communication channels, is being exposed by their challenges to and questioning of injustice, violence and censorship. The claim for equal opportunity and gender justice is clear in women's new communication outputs, ranging from research and feature a rticles published online to lively campaigns in radio and social networks. In new media technologies women have found great tools to advance and strengthen their objective of achieving full citizenship and equality in today's society.

Results from the Gender Report Card at the 2012 IGF: More women make a huge difference

APC on 16 Oct 2013
This report summarises the contents of the Gender Report Card sections of the workshop reports from the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) of 2012. Interestingly, it shows among other interesting outputs, that gender was most likely to be mentioned in those workshops in which women were most likely to participate.

Infographic - Sexual rights activism & the internet

Nadine Moawad on 24 Jul 2013
An infographic highlights the preliminary results from APC’s global survey on usage, risks, and navigation of internet regulation by sexual rights activists.

Survey on sexual activism, morality, and the internet

APC on 15 Jul 2013
Has the internet become an indispensable tool for feminist and LGBTQI advocacy? How savvy are sexual rights activists in handling the legal and technical issues that come along when they use the internet? How do they negotiate online threats and restrictions? Activists from around the world addressed these and other questions through a global online survey on sexual rights work and the internet.

A is for Agency

Nadine Moawad on 10 Jul 2013
It’s been a great month for cyber-feminism. The #FBrape campaign succeeded in changing the social network giant’s policies on violence against women in record time. The global alarm over the NSA surveillance scandal created mass awareness over privacy and access to personal data. And Instagram launched hipster filters for videos. Perhaps not as breakthrough, but definitely encouraging of more targeted filming and documentation. In its first phase, EROTICS generated a unique body of knowledge about the negotiations and navigations of internet regulation around sexuality content in five different countries. The case studies looked at usage, access, activism, identity and other fascinating components that highlight our relationship with cyberspace as sexual rights activists. As we move into the next phase, EROTICS II, the team is hoping to build on the learning to advance global mechanisms of support that amplify that work that different groups and networks are taking on locally.

Tangled, like wool - Sex, sexuality and the internet in India

Bishakha Datta on 10 Jul 2013
A recent survey of sexual rights activists in India shows that most consider the internet an integral part of their activism. Tangled, Like Wool explores several intertwined questions arising from this: What does the internet bring to sexual rights activism? Do the online and the offline complement each other in this kind of activism? How does keeping the internet free and open strengthen sexuality rights? And why do these seemingly disparate domains - 'sexual rights' and 'internet rights' - need to come closer together?

Indonesia: Put sex on the internet!

Kamilia Manaf on 10 Jul 2013
This article by Kamilia Manaf and Ni Loh Gusti Madewanti describes how the discourse on sexuality in Indonesia is becoming more political and part of the public sphere due to the impact of the reformations begun in 1998. However, while the internet has provided a space for the advancement of sexual rights in Indonesia, discrimination and violence against LGBT groups and women in Indonesia that has happened in physical spaces has penetrated into spaces online. Online harassment, cyber bullying and hate speech violate one’s sense of security. Homophobic behavior on the internet (cyber-homophobia) is now more common and continues to increase.

How activism shapes your experience of being a citizen on the internet

Jennifer Radloff on 9 Jul 2013
What does it mean to use the internet freely and fully? What freedom do you have to express who you are, how you live your life, what you desire, dream and believe in on the internet? And how safely can you communicate, contribute, exist, navigate and be in the spaces online that can so powerfully connect you to communities and knowledges that build our sense of self? This article written by Jennifer Radloff explores the ways in which activism shapes the experience of being a citizen on the internet, focusing mainly on safety issues experienced by sexual rights activists.

Women in the Information Society: Participating in development and ICT policy

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 10 May 2013
One of the main complaints by women during the discussions at the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) focused on the need for more women to participate in decisions about the development of the Internet, and the discussion and implementation of public policies aimed at building an inclusive information society, without discrimination based on gender or any other grounds.

Baseline study: Report on VAW and its reporting system in Philippines

Flavia Fascendini on 5 Apr 2013
When it comes to gender issues, technology presents opportunities and likewise challenges. Opportunities to promote gender equality and equity to end discrimination are endless and borderless. However, technology has become an unwilling accomplice that inflicts gender-based violence. Statistical data on violence against women and other gender-related crimes are regularly gathered to know if efforts of government have been effective in gradually reducing the number of these crimes and brought more victim-survivors to justice. Many have been said about how poor, dismal and incomprehensible these data are for the general cases of VAW. However, the main purpose of this study is to know the state of reporting and documenting of technology-related cases of violence against women so that it can help in the drafting of the guidelines and protocols for eVAW. Are there reports available on technology-related VAW? If yes, how are they documented? What is the reporting mechanism used?

Baseline study: Violence against women and gender based harassment in context of ICT penetration in Pakistan

Flavia Fascendini on 5 Apr 2013
This report is intended to provide insight into the use of ICT tools as a means of women empowerment, aiming to dissect their use in facilitating women in realising leadership roles in society. The report is meant primarily to tackle the issues of ‘Violence against women’ (VAW) and ‘Gender based cyber harassment’ in Pakistan, and to address these issues by holding a discourse on the use of ICTs as tools for the betterment of this condition – by enabling and positioning women in roles where they can proactively work towards such a goal themselves.

Right into reality

erika on 4 Apr 2013
Important achievements were attained at the recent Commission on the Status of Women 57th session reviewing government progress worldwide in addressing violence against women and girls. One such attainment was governments' recognition of the growing role of information and communication technologies in the continuum of violence against women. Perhaps you are a bit skeptical about the usefulness of such declarations in transforming women's every day lives. After all, in this same meeting feminists and governments alike heard about ever-increasing violence against women and girls – sexual violence in areas of conflict, sexual harassment on the streets, adolescent and child pregnancy, intimate partner violence, feminicides. Even if we interpret greater documentation as a sign of government progress to address VAWG (despite many noted limitations in unifying and honing data collection) the figures are numbing. We still need those vital civil society shadow report statistics to offer us a closer and frequently harsher, albeit unoffical, view of VAWG realities across the world.

Violence against women in Colombia: ICT overshadowed

In Colombia there is no law or public policy that relates directly to violence against women and information and communication technologies. "This is a scenario where a lot that needs to be done, but which, at the same time, offers us an opportunity," said Olga Martinez Paz of the organization Colnodo, which runs the Colombia part of the APC project "End violence: women's rights and safety online." GenderIT.org contributor Florencia Flores Iborra interviewed her about the highlights of the project in its first year and expectations for the coming year, the national legislative scene, the experience with mapping and documentation, and advocacy work on the local political level.
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