Blaming the victim

erika on 18 Dec 2012
It was a bit like ping-pong - reporters, activists, and representatives from civil society organisations in a hot debate on privacy in Facebook. Some pointed out how Facebook (FB) from its inception is designed to encourage giving up your innermost secrets – or at least your relationship status. That privacy configurations change frequently on FB and it's hard to keep up or understand the implications of a change.

Tell me what social network you use and I'll tell you what your struggle is

This article, written by Florencia Flores Iborra for GenderIT.org, analyses some current cultural practices on some of the more popular online social networks, and the ways in which the publication policies of these platforms support or restrict the proliferation of certain behaviors relating to respect for the rights of women on the internet.

She's begging to be raped – Twitterverse for feminists in Pakistan!

Urooj Zia on 17 Dec 2012
‘She's begging to be raped.’ That's the response that many feminists in Pakistan get online from Pakistani men seeking to shut them up. This is a response from Pakistani men to women merely tweeting about issues related to sexualised violence.

Stories that need to be heard

Sonia Randhawa on 7 Dec 2012
Tonight, as I was thinking through this blog, my three-year-old offered to help. “It's not easy,” I warned her. “You see, there was a man who hurt a woman. He hurt her lots, and told her that if she didn't keep quiet, that he'd hurt her again. But she didn't keep quiet, and she told people her story.”

IGF 2012: Day two in room four

Kateřina Fialová on 23 Nov 2012
What I most value about the IGF is that thanks to its multi-stakeholder principle, it widens my perspective on pressing internet governance issues. However, all three sessions I attended on day two in room number four, while talking about human rights, failed to include women's right perspective. Women internet users are important stakeholder and it is evident that even after six years of existence IGF still fails to engage them in equal footing with other stakeholders.

Women's take on internet governance: A selection of tweets from IGF 2012

Flavia Fascendini on 20 Nov 2012
This is a selection of the tweets circulated during the Internet Governance Forum in Baku, Azerbaijan, from November 6-9 2012. They were selected following the criteria of its relevance in reflecting the discussions around women’s role in internet governance processes, as well as women’s and internet rights during the IGF.

The Uprising of Women in the Arab World censored by Facebook

Yara Sallam on 13 Nov 2012
On 10 November, the page of The Uprising of Women in the Arab World posted that Dana, the Syrian woman whose photo was censored by Facebook, was restored after a call for support against Facebook censorship of her photo.

Interview with Arzu Geybullayeva on the internet rights of women in Azerbaijan

Nighat Dad on 9 Nov 2012
Nighat Dad from "Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan":http://www.digitalrightsfoundation.pk speaks to Arzu Geybullayeva, a regional analyst and a blogger from Azerbaijan. Arzu's areas of interest are regional politics, conflict resolution, and new social media. In their "feminist talk” Nighat asks Arzu about her impressions of the 7th Internet Governance Forum, that took place in Baku, and key internet rights issues faced by women in Azerbaijan.

New mobile app for sexuality research pulled back over privacy concerns

Melissa Hope Ditmore on 23 Oct 2012
Melissa Ditmore reflects on release and subsequent pulling back of new application designed to collect data on sexual activity by Kinsey Institute in the USA. She outlines privacy concerns raised and how these holes can jeopardize users data. She also makes a make a case how this app once privacy gaps are fixed can assist to document unwanted and often under-reported sexual experiences, such as rape or sexual harassment.

A little red dot on a map points to a significant debate

GenderIT.org on 3 Oct 2012
A Feminist talk entry published in GenderIT.org (in Portuguese) started an interesting exchange related to the complex fields of freedom of expression, censorship, hate speech, legal remedies, and ICT related violence against women. You must be asking yourself what it was about, in order to start such a complex debate. Well, it all starts with a map.

It's violent, it's misogynist. Something needs to be done, but what?

Sonia Randhawa on 16 Jul 2012
For those of you that don't know the appalling vitriol that Anita Sarkeesian has been subject to, you can read a summary of it <a href="http://www.newstatesman.com/blogs/internet/2012/07/what-online-harassment-looks">here</a>. It's worrying that there are people out there who are capable of perpetrating this campaign of hatred. But what's more worrying is that we don't seem to know what to do about it.

Censorship in South Africa: Protecting or policing?

Sonia Randhawa on 18 Jun 2012
The Spear is a painting that depicts the African National Congress leader and South African president Jacob Zuma in a rallying pose, with genitals exposed. It has caused controversy and been defaced. Images of the painting have gone viral on internet. In late May 2012, the South African Film and Publications Board classified the painting, as "16N" - not suitable for people under the age of 16 because it contains nudity. But in a country where one in four women is raped, Sonia Randhawa wonders just who the ban is supposed to protect.

Equality, non-interference, non-hierarchy: What the net should be

Sonia Randhawa on 24 May 2012
The UN Special Rapporteur on cultural rights Farida Shaheed made an important speech on internet governance in Geneva earlier in May 2012. She stressed the importance of upholding human rights principles online supporting the call of civil society for democratization of internet governance. Sonia Randhawa is urging all of us to not just look at what Farida Shaheed says, but also to take a look at the ways in which you personally and your organisation, if you have one, can and really need to get involved in these debates
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