endVaw research

The reality of getting online in Jamaica: How mobile phones and social media lead to violence against women

GenderIT.org on 20 Apr 2016
According to the research report “Violence against women and the use of information and communications technologies in Jamaica”, there is insufficient recognition of the relationships between information and communications technologies and violence against women in the country, and VAW in its many forms continues to be a serious problem. To know more about the Jamaican context and the research, GenderIT.org interviewed one of the authors of the report, Dhanaraj Thakur.

Violence against women and the use of information and communications technologies in Jamaica

on 10 Mar 2016
Existing research points out that a large number of women and girls in Jamaica suffer from gender based violence. In fact, violence against women (VAW) is a problem throughout the Caribbean region. There is a lack of research in Jamaica on the topic of violence against women and the use of information and communications technologies that can inform policy-makers and those in support services. This research project addresses that gap through the collection of empirical data that included a national survey of Internet users, interviews with survivors of abuse, focus groups, and expert interviews.

Balancing rights and interests: Best practices to counter online abuse and violence

Flavia Fascendini on 7 Mar 2016
The IGF Best Practice Forum on Online Abuse and Gender-Based Violence Against Women took place in Joao Pessoa, Brazil in November 2015. Representatives of civil society, academia and the private sector went through some of the key highlights and recommendations from the BPF but opened it up at different junctures for inputs and responses.

New Challenges to Freedom of Expression: Countering Online Abuse of Female Journalists

on 13 Feb 2016
This report provides recommendations by the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media, on how participating States, media organizations and intermediaries can assist in ensuring that female journalists and media actors can work without fear and exercise their human right to freedom of expression.

Technology-related violence against women in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Si Jeunesse Savait on 20 Jan 2016
This report emerges from research carried out in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) between November 2013 and April 2014 by Si Jeunesse Savait and the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) as part of a multi-country project entitled “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online”. Mobile phones had been the most frequently involved platform in the cases of technology-related VAW explored by the local research team. In all three of the cases, the survivors were victim to multiple acts of violence, either by the same person or different people who, for the most part, were in better control of the technology than the victims.

From sensitisation to changing women's lives: Understanding tech-related violence in the DRC

Bianca Baldo on 20 Jan 2016
In this article, Bianca Baldo interviews Françoise Mukuku and Patience Luyeye from Si Jeunesse Savait. In partnership with the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), they carried out the research mapping technology-related violence against women in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In the interview, they elaborate on some of the findings, gaps in legislation, ambiguous role of internet services providers, and how justice is defined by survivors.

Kenya country report: Technology-related violence against women

Mary Onyango on 20 Jan 2016
The research project is part of the remedies for victims/survivors of technology-related forms of violence against women (VAW). The project is an implementation by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) in partnership with seven countries: Mexico, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Philippines, Pakistan and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

From unawareness to women coming forward when under attack: Technology-related violence against women in Kenya

Tarryn Booysen on 20 Jan 2016
Kenya was one of seven countries covered under the Association for Progressive Communication’s End violence: Women’s rights and safety online research project. Here, GenderIT.org writer Tarryn Booysen speaks to the research team, giving us a closer look into the research findings.

IGF 2015 Best Practice Forum: Online Abuse and Gender-Based Violence Against Women Report

on 12 Jan 2016
The 2015 IGF Best Practice Forum (BPF) on Online Abuse and Gender-Based Violence Against Women used an open and inclusive process to gather a broad variety of views and inputs on this multidimensional problem over nine months. As a result of this community-driven process, the BPF’s draft findings reflect a rich diversity of responses from various stakeholders and regions regarding the issue.

Kenya: Exploring technology-related violence against women

Flavia Fascendini on 12 Jan 2016
This is the sixth in a series of mini editions highlighting the “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project. Each edition focuses on one country in which the research was conducted, and brings together major findings, and interviews with the research teams. Drawing on four documented case studies, the Kenya research documents the local characteristics of online violence against women, including an exploration of the policy and political background of the situation around technology-related violence. In the research some interesting themes/trends were picked up and some valuable recommendations were made.

General recommendation on women’s access to justice from the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women

GenderIT.org on 11 Jan 2016
In 2015, APC's Women's Rights Programme did advocacy work with the members of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) who are leading the development of the new general recommendations. One of these is the General Recommendation on Access to Justice. Influencing the language of the document in terms of how to incorporate ICTs in the draft was one of the main outcomes of this advocacy effort.

End violence research site: From impunity to justice

on 11 Jan 2016
The site launched by the Association for Progressive Communications reflect the background of the “From impunity to justice“ research and share its findings with a wide audience. The multi-country research explored corporate and state remedies for dealing with technology-related violence against women (VAW).

Democratic Republic of Congo: Exploring technology-related violence against women

Kateřina Fialová on 4 Jan 2016
This is the last in a series of mini editions highlighting the “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project. Each edition focuses on one country in which the research was conducted. It brings together major findings and interviews with the research teams. Drawing on three documented case studies, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) research documents some of the characteristics of online violence against women, including different routes women took in search of protection and remedies for these situations.

Threats on her phone and footsteps behind her back

Flavia Fascendini on 26 Nov 2015
Nina finished her work day at the high-fashion clothing store in the biggest shopping mall in Sarajevo. She sighed, remembering everything she had to go through to get out of that violent and abusive relationship that she endured for three years. One thousand and ninety-five days until she found the strength and support to end it. But that was just one step in the continuum of violence that would come afterwards.

Technology-related violence against women in Colombia: Sociocultural imaginaries and access to justice

Maria Goñi Mazzitelli on 23 Nov 2015
Colombia was one of seven countries covered by APC's research project “End violence: Women's rights and safety online”, carried out in partnership with Colnodo. In this article, María Goñi interviews Ana Maria Acosta and Marina López Sepulveda, two of the three researchers who worked with Colnodo and made interesting discoveries.
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