Feminist reflection on internet policies

Changing the way you see ICT

endVaw research

In this GenderIT.org edition, our collaborators take a moment to reflect and celebrate. They celebrate the great Take Back the Tech! campaign developed in late 2014 that for 16 days brought together women from around the world to reclaim their right to expression online. They also reflect on the first load of findings from the “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project research which sheds light on access to justice for survivors of technology-related violence against women. For survivors, the right to expression is a first step towards justice, redress and healing. Corporate policies, legislative frameworks and strategies developed and shared by survivors of violence have a crucial role to play when it comes to preventing incidents of violence and providing access to justice for women. The materials featured in this edition reinforce how we can collectively advocate for a change in online culture through campaigning, education and research.

In this GenderIT.org edition, our collaborators take a moment to reflect and celebrate. They celebrate the great Take Back the Tech! campaign developed in late 2014 that for 16 days brought together women from around the world to reclaim their right to expression online.

Building women’s access to justice: Technology-related VAW in law and corporate policy

Tarryn Booysen
Tarryn Booysen on 10 January, 2015 - 16:25
0 comments | 209 reads
Tarryn is a South African BA graduate with majors in Psychology and Sociology. She currently works on the End Violence: Women’s rights and safety online project as the administrative assistant. Tarryn is also a contributor of the weekly section of GenderIT, DJ’s Choice.

This article is based on the issue paper written by Namita Maholtra as part of the APC “End violence: Women´s rights and safety online” project entitled “Good questions on technology-related violence”, and on a strong alliance with partners in seven countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Mexico, Pakistan and the Philippines. Looking at tech-related violence against women, law and corporate policy, this article by Tarryn Booysen summarises the major points in the paper, responding to frequent questions on tech-related VAW and answering them with the research findings.

Good questions on technology-related violence

Namita Malhotra for APC's "End violence: Women's rights and safety online" project
Namita Malhotra for APC's "End violence: Women's rights and safety online" project on 8 January, 2015 - 23:30
0 comments | 173 reads

Between April 2013 and June 2014, the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) carried out its multi-country research exploring the adequacy and effectiveness of domestic legal remedies and corporate policies/redress mechanisms to address the issue of technology-related violence against women (VAW). This paper written by Namita Malhotra draws heavily on the final research reports from that project.

 

Cases on women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their access justice

End violence: Women's rights and safety online country partners and Richa Kaul Padte
End violence: Women's rights and safety online country partners and Richa Kaul Padte on 8 January, 2015 - 23:28
0 comments | 201 reads

The case summaries are based on in-depth case studies mapping women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their attempts to access justice either through domestic legal remedy or corporate grievance mechanisms. The original case studies were documented as part of the Association for Progressive Communication’s (APC) seven-country research initiative, “From impunity to justice: Exploring corporate and legal remedies for technology-related violence against women” , conducted in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Kenya, Mexico, Pakistan and the Philippines.

 

Violence against women online: What next steps intermediaries should take

Rafia Shaikh
Rafia Shaikh on 8 January, 2015
0 comments | 309 reads
Rafia is a tech journalist currently working as a research and communications associate at Digital Rights Foundation focusing on women rights, internet governance, and digital security. She spends her weekends translating and romanizing languages.
GenderIT.org

In the response to abuse and threats that women face, are the technology big names like Facebook, Twitter and others taking tangible steps? In this article, GenderIT.org collaborator Rafia Shaikh explores the most outstanding points from a new research report developed by Rima Athar for the APC’s “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project on Improving Corporate Policies, which talks about specific problems and guidelines on how internet intermediaries can improve their response to VAW online.

End violence: Case studies from Pakistan

Bytes for All  for the "End violence: Women's rights and safety online project"
Bytes for All for the "End violence: Women's rights and safety online project" on 22 December, 2014 - 09:41
0 comments | 69 reads

These case summaries are based on in-depth case studies mapping women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their attempts to access justice either through domestic legal remedy or corporate grievance mechanisms. The original case studies from Pakistan were documented by country researchers from the project partner Bytes for All Pakistan between November 2013 and April 2014 and the summaries were prepared by Richa Kaul Padte.

 

Protecting the right to freedom of expression: Strategies of survivors of tech-related violence against women

Bianca Baldo
Bianca Baldo on 10 January, 2015
2 comments | 405 reads
Bianca Baldo has over eight years of coordination experience in women human rights and anti human-trafficking advocacy, program management, gender protection and capacity-building training in Ecuador, Vietnam, Cambodia, Jamaica and Canada. She has completed a Bachelors of Arts in Comparative Development from Trent University, a Civil Law degree from University of Ottawa and Masters in Law from McGill University. She is presently working as a consultant with Roos-Remillard Consulting Services, on program design, funding proposals and training modules against human trafficking.
GenderIT.org

Tech-related violence against womeni hinders freedom of expressioni (FOE) as it creates an environment of fear, intimidation, violence, social isolation and impunity. This article written for GenderIT.orgi by Bianca Baldo explores the effects of tech-related VAW on women's rightsi to FOE, providing insight on human rightsi law, the different forms of tech-related VAW, the reasons behind it, the weaknesses in the responses, and the strategies used by online tech-related VAW survivors.

Virtual is real: Attempts to legally frame technology-related violence in a decentralized universe

Lamia Kosovic
Lamia Kosovic on 10 January, 2015
0 comments | 331 reads
Lamia Kosovic is an instructional designer and lecturer in Gender Studies and Communication Arts. She did her PhD studies in Philosophy of Communication Arts at the European Graduate School, and got her masters in Digital Media Studies at New School, NYC. She has worked as a writer on technology, as a student advisor, gender consultant, and graphic designer. She published a book "Re-imag(in)ing of the Posthuman" along with few other philosophical articles related to media and graphic arts. Lamia is a war survivor, a refugee survivor and a nomad. Now, she is actively looking for job while living in the States with her daughter. Love hanging in the mountains, on the rivers, oceans and coasts, love traveling and discovering new places.
GenderIT.org

In this article written for GenderIT.org, Lamia Kosovic explores some trends in legislation addressing tech-related VAW and stresses that “legislation itself will not solve the problem of VAW in digital spaces,” affirming that laws have to be accompanied by educational campaigns on the gendered nature of harm in digital spaces. “And it is urgent to expand our understanding of what survivors are experiencing, so we can be more productive in informing the systemic change needed to address this issue,” she adds.

Mapping as a strategy to disclose online violence against women

Dafne Sabanes Plou
Dafne Sabanes Plou on 10 January, 2015
0 comments | 313 reads
Dafne is the Women's Rights Programme coordinator for Latin America and the Caribbean.
GenderIT.org

When the APC Women’s Rights Programme decided to use the Ushahidi map to collect information about the online violence that many women around the world were enduring, the aim was to gather evidence and show how ICTs can be used to perpetrate violence against women. In two years, from July 2012 to July 2014, almost 500 cases denouncing the use of ICTs and online spaces to perpetrate violence against women have been uploaded onto the map. Though cases come from very different countries, they share many things in common. In this article by Dafne Sabanes Plou, the author compiles the main findings achieved through this platform, such as the average age of the victims/survivors, the type of harm inflicted, the platform used to perpetrate the harm, which are the different kind of perpetrators, and the action taken after the incident.

Pakistan country report: Technology driven violence against women

Bytes for All
Bytes for All on 3 October, 2014 - 01:41
0 comments | 275 reads
Bytes for All (B4A), Pakistan is a human rights organization and a network of information and communication technology professionals and practitioners. It experiments and organizes debate on the relevance of ICTs for sustainable development and strengthening social justice movements in the country. Its mission is “ICTs for development, democracy and social justice”.

Technology based violence is exposing women to the entire spectrum of conceivable harms in Pakistan. Victims of technology based violence have suffered physical violence ranging from rape to attempted assassination, psycho-social harms and loss of development opportunities. This was revealed in a research report launched by Bytes for All, Pakistan in Islamabad.

 
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