Feminist reflection on internet policies

Changing the way you see ICT

endVaw research

Technology-related violence against women – Recent legislative trends

Carly Nyst for the End violence: Women's rights and safety online project
Carly Nyst for the End violence: Women's rights and safety online project on 26 August, 2014 - 21:28
0 comments | 461 reads
Carly Nyst works for Privacy International and directs PI's work in developing countries. Carly is an Australian-qualified lawyer who has worked in human rights law and advocacy at both national and international levels.

This study seeks to explore recent legislative developments aimed at addressing and providing avenues of redress for technology-related violence against womeni. We explore the objectives, structure and application of four domestic legislative responses to different forms of violence against women, seeking to understand how domestic legislatures are responding to increasing awareness of violence against women online.

 

End violence research: Case summaries from country reports

Take Back the Tech!
Take Back the Tech! on 25 August, 2014 - 19:21
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The following case summaries are excerpted from End violence against womeni: Country reports, which involve seven countries and are part of research commissioned by the Association for Progressive Communicationsi Women's Rightsi Programme (APC WRP) beginning in 2013.

 

Internet intermediaries and violence against women online: User policies and redress framework of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube

Carly Nyst for the End violence: Women's rights and safety online project
Carly Nyst for the End violence: Women's rights and safety online project on 4 August, 2014 - 03:57
0 comments | 547 reads
Carly Nyst works for Privacy International and directs PI's work in developing countries. Carly is an Australian-qualified lawyer who has worked in human rights law and advocacy at both national and international levels.

A recent report, “Internet intermediaries and violence against women online” released by the Association for Progressive Communications for the “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project, analyses the policies and redress framework of the three major internet intermediaries: Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, in regard to violence against women online. These case studies allow APC to further its progress by creating a bridge between social networking platforms and policymakers by analyzing and addressing concerns found in the intermediaries’ online policies and responses to issues of VAW.

 

Domestic legal remedies for technology-related violence against women: Review of related studies and literature

Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau for the End violence: Women's rights and safety online project
Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau for the End violence: Women's rights and safety online project on 16 July, 2014 - 16:21
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This review of related studies and literature forms part of the legal remedy research which falls under the End violence: Women’s rights and safety online (EndVAW) flagship project of the Association for Progressive Communications (APC). The project is to be implemented from 2012 to 2015 with support from the Dutch government’s Funding Leadership and Opportunities for Women (FLOW) programme.

 

Towards internet intermediary responsibility

Carly Nyst
Carly Nyst on 26 November, 2013 - 18:37
1 comments | 1738 reads
Carly Nyst works for Privacy International and directs PI's work in developing countries. Carly is an Australian-qualified lawyer who has worked in human rights law and advocacy at both national and international levels.

A key pillar of the internet freedom movement is the concept that internet intermediaries should be immune from liability for any content hosted on their sites. Yet there is a clear and important need for intermediaries to play a more active role in ensuring that they are not complicit in incitement to violence against women. This article is third of the series that will explore the responsibility of intermediaries to ensure that the internet is a space that empowers, rather than subjugates, women.

Pulling back the veil of free speech?

Carly Nyst
Carly Nyst on 26 November, 2013 - 18:12
0 comments | 1301 reads
Carly Nyst works for Privacy International and directs PI's work in developing countries. Carly is an Australian-qualified lawyer who has worked in human rights law and advocacy at both national and international levels.

International human rights law provides for a strong right to free expression that must be tempered by the need to protect against hate speech, or speech that incites violence, including violence against women. However, the existence of exceptions to the right to freedom of expression does not, however, mean that the prohibition against hate speech and incitement to hatred is a straight forward or uncontroversial idea. On the contrary, the exceptions to Article 19 are highly controversial, subjective and prone to manipulation by State and other entities. What, then, are the legitimate avenues for redress of hate speech when it occurs on the internet? This article is the second of the series that will explore the responsibility of intermediaries to ensure that the internet is a space that empowers, rather than subjugates, women.

How gender-based harassment falls through the digital cracks?

Carly Nyst
Carly Nyst on 26 November, 2013 - 17:28
0 comments | 1885 reads
Carly Nyst works for Privacy International and directs PI's work in developing countries. Carly is an Australian-qualified lawyer who has worked in human rights law and advocacy at both national and international levels.

When did the internet transform from being a democratized space and tool of empowerment, that has franchised hundreds of millions of women and girls, to an arena of gender-based hatred? This article is first of the series that will explore the responsibility of intermediaries to ensure that the internet is a space that empowers, rather than subjugates, women.

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