endVaw research

Briefings on technology-related violence against women for the 29 Human Rights Council session

APC has developed a brief and a background document on technology-related violence against women to support our advocacy efforts at the 29th session of the Human Rights Council (HRC), with special attention to the work with the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, the Working Group on discrimination against women in law, and the annual HRC resolution on VAW, which focuses on domestic violence in this year’s edition.

These documents draw on the multi-country research project

APC's Oral Statement on Violence against Women at the UN Human Rights Council

29th Regular Session of the UN Human Rights Council. Agenda Item 3: Interactive Dialogue with the Special Rapporteur on violence against women. Oral statement delivered by Chat Ramilo Garcia on behalf of the Association for Progressive Communications (APC)

Thank you Mr. President.

The Association for Progressive Communications welcomes the report of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women.

Gender violence on the internet: The Philippine experience

This report emerges from research carried out in the Philippines between August 2013 and April 2014 by the Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA) and the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) as part of a multi-country project entitled End violence: Women’s rights and safety online.

The Philippines ranks high in terms of gender equality: in 2013 the World Economic Forum placed it first in Asia and fifth in the world.

Pakistan country report: Technology driven violence against women

Technology based violence is exposing women to the entire spectrum of conceivable harms in Pakistan. Victims of technology based violence have suffered physical violence ranging from rape to attempted assassination, psycho-social harms and loss of development opportunities. This was revealed in a research report launched by Bytes for All, Pakistan in Islamabad.

The report titled “Technology Driven Violence against Women” consolidates findings from three case studies featuring women who have survived violence and abuse originating from misuse of technology.

Reporting, reviewing, and responding to harassment on Twitter

This report was produced at the request of Women, Action, and the Media (WAM!). Aside from Jaclyn Friedman, founder and former executive director of WAM!, the authors of this document are academics from the filds of computational social science, anthropology, sociology, network science, and computer science.

How technology issues impact women’s rights: 10 points on Section J

Twenty years ago, the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, a roadmap for gender equality, was adopted by 189 countries. Section J of the Beijing Platform addresses women and the media, which fits into the work of APC Women’s Rights Programme: ensuring women’s access to and participation in the development of information and communications technology (ICT), advocating for women’s freedom of expression, and working to prevent technology-based violence against women.

Infographic: Mapping technology-based violence against women - Take Back the Tech! top 8 findings

Available in English, Spanish and French

Download the infographic here or below

From impunity to justice: Domestic legal remedies for cases of technology-related violence against women

Download the fulltext report below or here

The summary report can be downloaded here.

The present report seeks to examine existing domestic legal remedies for survivors of technology-related violence against women (VAW) to access justice.

From impunity to justice: Domestic legal remedies for cases of technology-related violence against women - Summary

Download the pdf file here or below

Download the pdf file of the full report here

_This is a summary of the research report “From impunity to justice: Domestic legal remedies for cases of technology-related violence against women”, by the Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau.

From impunity to justice: Exploring corporate and legal remedies for technology-related violence against women

A new series of reports by the Association for Progressive Communications presents findings from a multi-country research project on technology-related violence against women (VAW). The research – which reveals a lack of access to justice for survivors – highlights the voices and experiences of women from the global south who have faced technology-related VAW and sought justice through state agencies and internet intermediaries. The research also identifies available legal remedies, and analyses theirs strengths and limitations.

From impunity to justice: Improving corporate policies to end technology-related violence against women - Summary

Download the pdf file here or below

Download the pdf file of the full report here

The present report explores women’s experiences of and demands for corporate accountability in cases of technology-related violence against women (VAW) .

End violence: Case studies from Democratic Republic of Congo

These case summaries are based on in-depth case studies mapping women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their attempts to access justice either through domestic legal remedy or corporate grievance mechanisms.

End violence: Case studies from Mexico

The case summaries are based on in-depth case studies mapping women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their attempts to access justice either through domestic legal remedy or corporate grievance mechanisms.

Building women’s access to justice: Technology-related VAW in law and corporate policy

This article is based on the issue paper written by Namita Maholtra as part of the APC "End violence: Women´s rights and safety online” project entitled "Good questions on technology-related violence", and on a strong alliance with partners in seven countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Mexico, Pakistan and the Philippines. Looking at tech-related violence against women, law and corporate policy, this article by Tarryn Booysen summarises the major points in the paper, responding to frequent questions on tech-related VAW and answering them with the research findings.

_This article is based on the issue paper written by Namita Maholtra as part of the APC “End violence: Women´s rights and safety online” project entitled “Good questions on technology-related violence”, and on a strong alliance with partners in seven countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Mexico, Pakistan and the Philippines.

Good questions on technology-related violence

Download the pdf file here or below

Between April 2013 and June 2014, the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) carried out its multi-country research exploring the adequacy and effectiveness of domestic legal remedies and corporate policies/redress mechanisms to address the issue of technology-related violence against women (VAW).

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