feminist principles of the internet

A painting of an African feminist internet

Irene Kagoya on 9 Feb 2017
Addressing the internet gender divide in Africa can only be achieved through the deliberate creation of a feminist internet, and this was affirmed by the Gender and Internet Governance eXchange (gigX) workshop that was held on 10 October 2016 in Durban. We need a feminist internet that works to empower all of us in our diversities, creates equal power relations, and dismantles patriarchy in all of its forms.

Defining their place: Gender at the Internet Governance Forum 2016

Smita on 18 Jan 2017
The Internet Governance Forum has been valuable as a multistakeholder space that facilitates the discussion and dialogue of public policy issues pertaining to the Internet. Over the years several feminists, activists and others interested in diverse representation have been participating in IGF and observing how concerns related to gender, sexuality, and the internet are raised and addressed. Smita Vanniyar writes a short report on IGF 2016 in Guadalajara, Mexico, and how gender and sexuality are still largely a concern for the women activists and queer people present, rather than for all.

Beyond the offline-online binary – why women need a new global social contract

Anita Gurumurthy on 13 Dec 2016
The non-territorial, transborder Internet has added layers of complexity to the human rights debate. The idea of substantive equality – a compass for human rights and the key to gender justice – must be interpreted anew and afresh, as the force of digital technologies complicates the nature of social relations and institutions. The easy binary divisions of online and offline cease to make sense in an increasingly digitised world.

ARROW for Change: Sexuality, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Internet

GenderIT.org on 7 Dec 2016
What are the relationships and interdependencies influencing the promises of being online: voice, visibility, and power? This ARROW for Change (AFC) issue on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and the internet documents some of these dynamics.

[EDITORIAL] How Internet Technology Will Affect Rights: 3 Things to Look For

Nadine Moawad on 6 Dec 2016
Economic, social, cultural rights in international law is a recognition of the basic rights of all people to a fundamentally decent and happy life - one in which their right to self-determination is respected. Does the progressively digitised future threaten or cement a world where ESC rights are guaranteed for all? In this editorial, Nadine Moawad states that the network is good and the network is here, but there are 3 things to look out for - especially in relation to economic, social, cultural rights.

Role of internet in realising sexual and reproductive rights in Uganda: Interview with Allana Kembabazi

Tarryn Booysen on 6 Dec 2016
In this interview, Allana Kembabazi of Initiative Social And Economic Rights in Uganda, talks about the role of the internet in advocacy and campaigns about high rates of maternal mortality in Uganda and sexual and reproductive rights. In a context where health care is far from sufficient, the internet also becomes an avenue for provision of sexual and reproductive health related information that is not easily accessible otherwise.

Algorithmic discrimination and the feminist politics of being in the data

Dr. Nicole Shephard on 5 Dec 2016
Global data volume has grown exponentially in recent years and experts expect this trend to continue. The wider trend towards the pervasive datafication of our lives is not one we can just sit out. Big data and the algorithmic decisions it feeds permeate citizenship, healthcare, welfare states, education, finance, law enforcement as well as the ways in which we shop, travel, and live our social lives. They can take on a benign air of innovation and efficiency but also carry an intrinsic baggage of surveillance and control.

10 years of Take Back the Tech!

GenderIT.org on 16 Nov 2016
Technology facilitates violence against women, but it also facilitates information sharing, capacity building, networking and alternative media - Take back the tech! is the realisation of the idea that the internet can be used to expand the movement against all forms of gender-based violence. This edition brings to us the voices from the campaigns from the Democratic Republic of Congo to Canada, Bosnia-Herzegovina to India, that not only push back on the growing amounts of online VAW, but actively claim the internet as a space, a forum, a playground and a hope for women and gender non-conforming people, and also queer and trans people.

In Search of Allies: Interview with TBTT campaigners in India

Smita on 15 Nov 2016
In this set of interviews, Smita Vanniyar speaks to Japleen Pasricha of Feminism in India, and Divya Rajgopal of WhyHate. In separate ways, both these are projects of passion that find ways to reclaim technology for women and also others marginalised on account of gender non-conformity, sexuality, caste, religion and class. They discuss the pros and cons of anonymity, how to address online VAW and how to raise issues that are difficult and troublesome.

Technology as lingua franca: Interview with Caroline Tagny

Bianca Baldo on 15 Nov 2016
A detailed conversation with activist and writer Caroline Tagny on the various campaigns that she has been part of with Take Back the Tech. The interviewer, Bianca Baldo, focuses on the politics of language in these various campaigns and the importance of content in local language to connect to and bring together people and movements. The role of French as both a language of the colonial oppressor and a common language in countries in West and Central Africa and parts of Canada has particularly played out in these campaigns.

Fortitude and change in AWID Forum 2016

GenderIT.org on 5 Oct 2016
In this special edition of GenderIT.org we share the experiences and reflections on the recent 13th AWID International Forum, in which a large group of women from APC Women's Rights Programme, from different countries and regions, participated enthusiastically. With the participation of 1,700 people from 140 countries, this year's AWID Forum showed that the feminist movement keeps growing stronger worldwide, and is committed to a politics of diversity and inclusion. We definitely do not and cannot lead single-issue lives.

Public. Autonomous. Anonymous. Group. Sexting. At AWID 2016. Oh yeah!

erika on 5 Oct 2016
"Welcome to the Feminist Internet eXchange Hub! Make sure you come back tonight for some group sexting - public, autonomous, anonymous, group sexting!" we called to women as they stumbled in to explore our feminist internet exchange space at AWID Feminist Futures Forum, 2016. Sometimes they grinned and asked "what time!?", sometimes their cheeks reddened and they looked away abruptly. Most were like - "Huh?"

The backbone of our thirsty complicities: from internet hiccups to collective synapsis at AWID 2016

Ganesh on 5 Oct 2016
Not being able to connect online has geopolitical and infrastructural dimensions. On the one hand, we face the challenge to defend internet as a common good, beyond the claws of Capitalism and Patriarchy; on the other hand, we encounter the possibility of creating and engaging in other landscapes. Bringing to life places (though sometimes ephemeral) like the Feminist Internet Exchange FixHub in AWID Forum is of extreme relevance.

Mapping the feminist internet: the Whose Knowledge? campaign at the AWID Forum

Siko Bouterse on 3 Oct 2016
Whose Knowledge? works with individuals, communities, organisations and movements worldwide to create, collect and curate knowledge from and with marginalised communities, particularly women, people of colour, LGBTQI communities, indigenous peoples and others from the global South. Essentially, Whose Knowledge? is a radical re-imagining and reconstruction of the internet, so that the internet can truly be from and for us all.
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