feminist principles of the internet

Did Facebook finally figure out that consent is more important than nipples?

erika on 3 May 2017
In April 2017 Facebook announced a new tool that will prevent an intimate image posted without consent from being shared further on Facebook, Messenger and Instagram. Erika Smith and Fungai Machirori go deep and debate the pros and cons of this proposed system, and how feminist-friendly and positive about alternate sexualities it is.

10 ways to make Twitter work for feminist activism

Samukelisiwe Mabaso on 25 Apr 2017
How to bring the powerful agency and discourse of women's rights movements and feminism to the digital age of Twitter and other social media. Samukelisiwe Mabaso has researched on various movements across Africa and Asia that successfully and effectively use technology, and shows us ten ways in which to make Twitter work for feminist activism. Lets get in formation!

[COLUMN] Open software movements, open content, free culture: Where are the women?

Evelin Heidel - Scann on 18 Apr 2017
The gender balance is far from equal even in progressive movements such as the free and open source software community, Mozilla user groups, and others. Despite all the rivers of ink that were written about the gender imbalance in these areas, the changes are slow to arrive.

[COLUMN] I want to be a Pokémon master

Angélica Contreras on 13 Apr 2017
Pokémon exploded as a game that could be played on mobile phones in 2016. Of the many debates around it, Angélica Contreras explores the gendered aspect of videogames and how Pokémon struck a chord with many women in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and parts of Latin America. This article was originally written in Spanish, and is part of a column series that explores young women and their lives immersed in technology.

[BOOK REVIEW] Interpreting the Internet: Feminist and Queer counterpublics in Latin America

Alan Finlay on 5 Apr 2017
'Interpreting the internet: Feminist and Queer Counterpublics in Latin America by Elisabeth Jay Friedman looks at a decade long engagement of feminist and women's movements with technology. Alan Finlay reviews the book for GenderIT.org, and finds it to be essential reading for anyone interested in how feminist (or any) counterpublics are formed and shaped by appropriating whatever technology is available.

A Woman Coder's Journey (Women-in-tech)

GenderIT.org on 23 Feb 2017
Judith Owigar speaks about her journey entering into tech spaces, and also about their work with Akirachix in Kenya helping other women along the same journey marked by trials, exclusions and success. While speaking about the barriers of education in science and technology (STEM), she says that what inspires her work in many forums around women in tech in Africa, is that eventually a woman should have the space to make her own choices.

A painting of an African feminist internet

Irene Kagoya on 9 Feb 2017
Addressing the internet gender divide in Africa can only be achieved through the deliberate creation of a feminist internet, and this was affirmed by the Gender and Internet Governance eXchange (gigX) workshop that was held on 10 October 2016 in Durban. We need a feminist internet that works to empower all of us in our diversities, creates equal power relations, and dismantles patriarchy in all of its forms.

Defining their place: Gender at the Internet Governance Forum 2016

Smita on 18 Jan 2017
The Internet Governance Forum has been valuable as a multistakeholder space that facilitates the discussion and dialogue of public policy issues pertaining to the Internet. Over the years several feminists, activists and others interested in diverse representation have been participating in IGF and observing how concerns related to gender, sexuality, and the internet are raised and addressed. Smita Vanniyar writes a short report on IGF 2016 in Guadalajara, Mexico, and how gender and sexuality are still largely a concern for the women activists and queer people present, rather than for all.

Beyond the offline-online binary – why women need a new global social contract

Anita Gurumurthy on 13 Dec 2016
The non-territorial, transborder Internet has added layers of complexity to the human rights debate. The idea of substantive equality – a compass for human rights and the key to gender justice – must be interpreted anew and afresh, as the force of digital technologies complicates the nature of social relations and institutions. The easy binary divisions of online and offline cease to make sense in an increasingly digitised world.

ARROW for Change: Sexuality, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Internet

GenderIT.org on 7 Dec 2016
What are the relationships and interdependencies influencing the promises of being online: voice, visibility, and power? This ARROW for Change (AFC) issue on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and the internet documents some of these dynamics.

[EDITORIAL] How Internet Technology Will Affect Rights: 3 Things to Look For

Nadine Moawad on 6 Dec 2016
Economic, social, cultural rights in international law is a recognition of the basic rights of all people to a fundamentally decent and happy life - one in which their right to self-determination is respected. Does the progressively digitised future threaten or cement a world where ESC rights are guaranteed for all? In this editorial, Nadine Moawad states that the network is good and the network is here, but there are 3 things to look out for - especially in relation to economic, social, cultural rights.

Role of internet in realising sexual and reproductive rights in Uganda: Interview with Allana Kembabazi

Tarryn Booysen on 6 Dec 2016
In this interview, Allana Kembabazi of Initiative Social And Economic Rights in Uganda, talks about the role of the internet in advocacy and campaigns about high rates of maternal mortality in Uganda and sexual and reproductive rights. In a context where health care is far from sufficient, the internet also becomes an avenue for provision of sexual and reproductive health related information that is not easily accessible otherwise.

Algorithmic discrimination and the feminist politics of being in the data

Dr. Nicole Shephard on 5 Dec 2016
Global data volume has grown exponentially in recent years and experts expect this trend to continue. The wider trend towards the pervasive datafication of our lives is not one we can just sit out. Big data and the algorithmic decisions it feeds permeate citizenship, healthcare, welfare states, education, finance, law enforcement as well as the ways in which we shop, travel, and live our social lives. They can take on a benign air of innovation and efficiency but also carry an intrinsic baggage of surveillance and control.

10 years of Take Back the Tech!

GenderIT.org on 16 Nov 2016
Technology facilitates violence against women, but it also facilitates information sharing, capacity building, networking and alternative media - Take back the tech! is the realisation of the idea that the internet can be used to expand the movement against all forms of gender-based violence. This edition brings to us the voices from the campaigns from the Democratic Republic of Congo to Canada, Bosnia-Herzegovina to India, that not only push back on the growing amounts of online VAW, but actively claim the internet as a space, a forum, a playground and a hope for women and gender non-conforming people, and also queer and trans people.
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