governance

Curfew on Solidarities: Interviews with Kashmiri activists on censorship and lockdown

Namita on 2 Sep 2016
Social media is both the space for building a new language to speak about Kashmir in terms of occupation, resistance, settler colonialism or separatist movements, and it also is a technology of control for the Indian government. Banning certain websites and people and blocking the internet for periods extending to weeks is seen as completely acceptable ways of dealing with the "Kashmir crisis".

“In our work, the internet is a main stakeholder”: A feminist talk with Hayriye Avatar at the IGF

Bishakha Datta on 25 Sep 2014
The Turkish LGBTI rights organization Kaos GL turns 20 on September 20. At the Internet Governance Forum just held in Istanbul, Bishakha Datta interviewed Kaos activist Hayriye Avatar on their pathbreaking LGBTI activism, both online and offline.

Why do the Feminist Principles of the Internet matter?

Dhyta Caturani on 25 Sep 2014
There were several sessions and side meetings at the 9th Internet Governance Forum (IGF). Out of those, there were only a few on gender and sexuality. The Gender Dynamic Coalition launched the Feminist Principles of the Internet at the end of the session, making the document officially public. Here is an analysis on why those principles matter.

Summary Report of the Gender Dynamic Coalition meeting at the IGF 2014

Nadine Moawad on 25 Sep 2014
The Gender Dynamic Coalition meeting discussed the outcomes from key processes and discussions on internet governance leading up to the IGF 2014 – including 2013 IGF Gender Report Card findings, WSIS+10 results, and NetMundial to assess integration of gender issues and concerns. The meeting also launched the new Feminist Principles of the Internet which is a working document produced from a meeting of over 50 women’s and internet rights activists in April 2014.

Queering internet governance in Indonesia

Flavia Fascendini on 1 Sep 2014
The blockade of LGBTIQ websites by several Internet Service Providers (ISP) has been happening since 2011. The act is often a one-sided decision without prior notification to owner of website. In response to such situation, in 2012, LGBTIQ activists began advocating Human Rights of LGBTIQ in the area of internet management. These activists include Institut Pelangi Perempuan (IPP), Ourvoice (OV), Arus Pelangi and Gamacca. The social movement and process of advocacy against cyber-homophobia and the decision to close LGBTIQ websites in Indonesia then become a movement introduced as “Queering Internet Governance in Indonesia.”

Results from the Gender Report Card at the 2012 IGF: More women make a huge difference

APC on 16 Oct 2013
This report summarises the contents of the Gender Report Card sections of the workshop reports from the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) of 2012. Interestingly, it shows among other interesting outputs, that gender was most likely to be mentioned in those workshops in which women were most likely to participate.

Let's talk about gender analysis in the LAC IGF

Flavia Fascendini on 30 Sep 2013
The APC Women's Rights Programme attended the preparatory meeting prior to the Latin American Internet Governance Forum held in late August in Córdoba, Argentina. Attending were Erika Smith, Dafne Sabanes Plou, and Flavia Fascendini. The Spanish language editor of GenderIT.org interviewed both feminists to analyse whether the internet governance debate still marginalises gender issues, or if they have truly become cross-cutting.

Women in the Information Society: Participating in development and ICT policy

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 10 May 2013
One of the main complaints by women during the discussions at the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) focused on the need for more women to participate in decisions about the development of the Internet, and the discussion and implementation of public policies aimed at building an inclusive information society, without discrimination based on gender or any other grounds.

Violence against women in Colombia: ICT overshadowed

In Colombia there is no law or public policy that relates directly to violence against women and information and communication technologies. "This is a scenario where a lot that needs to be done, but which, at the same time, offers us an opportunity," said Olga Martinez Paz of the organization Colnodo, which runs the Colombia part of the APC project "End violence: women's rights and safety online." GenderIT.org contributor Florencia Flores Iborra interviewed her about the highlights of the project in its first year and expectations for the coming year, the national legislative scene, the experience with mapping and documentation, and advocacy work on the local political level.

"What went wrong?" Anita Gurumurthy's statement at the closing ceremony of WSIS plus 10 review

Anita Gurumurthy on 8 Mar 2013
The statement by Anita Gurumurthy, Executive Director, IT for Change, at the closing ceremony of WSIS plus 10 review held by UNESCO from 25th to 27th February, 2013, starts questioning _"what went wrong?"_ in the last decade since the internet should have been been equalising social and economic opportunity. Why did the internet, and the information society phenomenon not do what it was supposed to do?

Baku in APC’s rear-view mirror

APC on 26 Feb 2013
The Internet Governance Forum in Baku (6-9 November 2012) was a space in which different interests collided. APC revisits by releasing “IGF 2012: The good, the bad and the ugly“. Gender is of course part of this analysis. The report stresses that only one workshop dealt with gender issues specifically, and speakers in main sessions and workshops were still mostly male. "When we look closely, it is apparent that the issues relevant to gender at the IGF cover just about everything that the IGF does," the report says. "Gender should become a cross cutting thread that is recognized as important, alongside the currently accepted cross-cutting themes of capacity building and development".

Women at the IGF: Now we need to mainstream gender

Sonia Randhawa on 22 Nov 2012
This year's Internet Governance Forum came to a close in Baku, Azerbaijan on 16 November. GenderIT.org contributor Sonia Randhawa spoke to three women about their experiences at the IGF, and whether any progress is being made in terms of the representation of women, and the prominence of women's rights and gender as cross-cutting issues for internet goverance. Jac sm Kee is from Malaysia and represented the APC Women's Rights Programme; GenderIT.org editor Katerina Fialova is from the Czech Republic; and Bosnian Valentina Pellizzer is executive director of OneWorld SouthEast Europe.

Has the seventh IGF brought breakthrough for gender equality?

Flavia Fascendini on 22 Nov 2012
It is my pleasure to introduce this volume of essays on gender issues at the IGF. The seventh IGF, held in Baku Azerbaijan during 2012, saw several milestones. The IGF showed that it was a maturing forum that was able to tackle important issues, some of which had been taboo in the past.

Global survey on internet privacy and freedom of expression

Flavia Fascendini on 20 Nov 2012
This publication seeks to identify the relationship between freedom of expression and internet privacy, assessing where they support or compete with each other in different circumstances. The book maps out the issues in the current regulatory landscape of internet privacy from the viewpoint of freedom of expression. It provides an overview of legal protection, self-regulatory guidelines, normative challenges, and case studies relating to the topic.

Going visible: Women’s rights on the internet

APC on 16 Nov 2012
Information and communication technologies (ICTs) create new scenarios, new ways for people to live, and these reflect real-­life problems. Women need to assert their rights here with determination and without delay. Women may not have been an active part of policy-­making conversations when internet governance started, but the rapid pace of change online means they need to participate now to ensure that the future of the internet is shaped taking into account women’s rights. Leading up to the year 2015, the United Nations is planning a series of consultations to help shape the post-2015 agenda with support from Civil Society coalitions including the Global Call to Action Against Poverty, CIVICUS and the Beyond 2015 Campaign, which have been organising Civil Society engagement in post-2015 discussions. This paper was developed by the Women´s Rights Programme as part of the global thematic consultation "Addressing inequalities - The Heart of the Post-2015 Development Agenda and the Future We Want for All".
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