imagine a feminist internet

[COLUMN] Open software movements, open content, free culture: Where are the women?

Evelin Heidel - Scann on 18 Apr 2017
The gender balance is far from equal even in progressive movements such as the free and open source software community, Mozilla user groups, and others. Despite all the rivers of ink that were written about the gender imbalance in these areas, the changes are slow to arrive.

[COLUMN] I want to be a Pokémon master

Angélica Contreras on 13 Apr 2017
Pokémon exploded as a game that could be played on mobile phones in 2016. Of the many debates around it, Angélica Contreras explores the gendered aspect of videogames and how Pokémon struck a chord with many women in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and parts of Latin America. This article was originally written in Spanish, and is part of a column series that explores young women and their lives immersed in technology.

The nerdiest and most open of them all: Internet Freedom Festival 2017

Smita on 7 Apr 2017
The Internet Freedom Festival is refreshingly different from most forums around internet rights and technology - it is almost equal in gender ratio, welcoming of gender non conforming and trans persons, and takes privacy of its participants at the venue seriously. Smita Vanniyar tells us more about their experience at the festival this year in Valencia, Spain.

[BOOK REVIEW] Interpreting the Internet: Feminist and Queer counterpublics in Latin America

Alan Finlay on 5 Apr 2017
'Interpreting the internet: Feminist and Queer Counterpublics in Latin America by Elisabeth Jay Friedman looks at a decade long engagement of feminist and women's movements with technology. Alan Finlay reviews the book for GenderIT.org, and finds it to be essential reading for anyone interested in how feminist (or any) counterpublics are formed and shaped by appropriating whatever technology is available.

Giving my spirit voice: Interview with Helen Nyinakiiza

Namita on 17 Mar 2017
An interview with Helen Nyinakiiza, who has recently joined Association for Progressive Communication as an individual member. Helen is a passionate digital security trainer, and in this interview she talks about the use of technology and internet rights in Uganda, the digital divide around gender and region, and how she does her trainings.

Feminist autonomous infrastructure in the internet battlefield: From Zombies to Ninjas

Nadège on 22 Feb 2017
The Distributed Denial of Women strike borrows the metaphor of the DDOS (distributed denial of service) attack as a radical and subversive tool by activists, but currently DDOS attacks powered by zombie-bots are part of the anarcho-capitalist economies of the internet. Ganesh in their article unpacks the many levels at which gendered labour is extracted, and while positing feminist autonomous infrastructures as an alternative, points to the flaws and the contradictions in the movement and civil society as well.

A painting of an African feminist internet

Irene Kagoya on 9 Feb 2017
Addressing the internet gender divide in Africa can only be achieved through the deliberate creation of a feminist internet, and this was affirmed by the Gender and Internet Governance eXchange (gigX) workshop that was held on 10 October 2016 in Durban. We need a feminist internet that works to empower all of us in our diversities, creates equal power relations, and dismantles patriarchy in all of its forms.

Defining their place: Gender at the Internet Governance Forum 2016

Smita on 18 Jan 2017
The Internet Governance Forum has been valuable as a multistakeholder space that facilitates the discussion and dialogue of public policy issues pertaining to the Internet. Over the years several feminists, activists and others interested in diverse representation have been participating in IGF and observing how concerns related to gender, sexuality, and the internet are raised and addressed. Smita Vanniyar writes a short report on IGF 2016 in Guadalajara, Mexico, and how gender and sexuality are still largely a concern for the women activists and queer people present, rather than for all.

Technology as lingua franca: Interview with Caroline Tagny

Bianca Baldo on 15 Nov 2016
A detailed conversation with activist and writer Caroline Tagny on the various campaigns that she has been part of with Take Back the Tech. The interviewer, Bianca Baldo, focuses on the politics of language in these various campaigns and the importance of content in local language to connect to and bring together people and movements. The role of French as both a language of the colonial oppressor and a common language in countries in West and Central Africa and parts of Canada has particularly played out in these campaigns.

[COLUMN] The Gender Binary: Thank you!

Nadika on 22 Sep 2016
The word Impostor keeps coming up every time a trans woman writes about herself. It is there, just below the surface, despite all the estrogen and progesterone, under all the skin-colour foundation and pink lipstick and shiny earrings. It is behind the pads on our breast, cushioning the tender nipples. The feeling, and the word - impostor. We are impostors when we try to be us, and when we try to be what you think we are.

Feminism online in West and Central Africa: Identities and digital colonisation

Caroline Tagny on 31 May 2016
This article examines the challenges that women's rights and sexual rights activists face in online feminist organising and participation in internet governance decision-making processes in West and Central Africa. It focuses particularly on linguistic barriers, and the expression of sexual or gender non-conforming identities in a context of digital colonisation in the sub-region.

Data: The new four-letter word for feminism

Anita Gurumurthy on 31 May 2016
The discourse of data in network capitalism has unleashed an ethical crisis of self and society. As the all-pervasive grids of surveillance and big data ideology take over control of social behaviour and democratic politics, women seem to be increasingly disciplined by state authority and neoliberal capital alike. Can feminism offer a way out?

[EDITORIAL] Feminist Principles of the Internet: Two years later

Dhyta Caturani on 31 May 2016
Two years after the initial birth of the Feminist Principles of the Internet, Dhyta helps us frame this edition where we see how feminists put the principles into practice in their own contexts. “As an evolving document, we need to constantly revisit it to make sure that it stays relevant, or else we should clarify, revise or even change it in accordance with the new circumstances and our needs,” she emphasises.

Three key issues for a feminist internet: Access, agency and movements

GenderIT.org on 23 May 2016
The Feminist Principles of the Internet arose from the first Imagine a Feminist Internet meeting in 2014 in Malaysia. The meeting brought together 52 women's rights, sexual rights and internet rights activists from six continents to discuss one question: "As feminists, what kind of internet do we want, and what will it take for us to achieve it?" The principles cover the topics of access, agency, expression, economy, movements and public participation. In this edition, we have inv ted partners from our #ImagineaFeministInternet network to dive into the topics of *access, agency and movements* and weave in some of the conversations that took place at the second Imagine a Feminist Internet meeting in July 2015.
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