internet governance

Multi-stakeholderism is about losing: Reflections on working through the AfriSIG practicum

Natasha Msonza on 7 Sep 2015
‘Multi-stakeholderism is about losing.’ I first heard this statement on the first day of the African School on Internet Governance (AfriSIG) in Dr David Souter’s lecture and overview of the Internet governance ecosystem and its key players

Exchange moment

Chioma Phibe Nwaodike on 7 Sep 2015
It all started a couple of weeks ago when the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) invited me to apply for participation in an exchange with women’s rights, internet rights and sexual rights activists to discuss, exchange and build awareness and understanding of the relationship between gender, women’s rights and internet governance. I had not realized that at end of it, I would not be afraid to call myself a feminist.

The experience of complexities and dynamics in public policy making

Loyce Kyogabirwe on 5 Sep 2015
It is on again! The third African School on Internet Governance (AfriSIG) kicked off on Tuesday September 2015 in Addis Abba. The 2015 #AfriSIG is a diverse and dynamic group of people with different gender identities, expertise and age. Being at the AfriSIG is a whole new experience to me and has made me realise how little I know about the internet and internet governance in particular despite the fact that I use it every day.

Reflections on gender and internet governance in Africa

Chenai Chair on 4 Sep 2015
Before I attended the Gender and Internet Governance eXchange (gigX) I did not think there was anything I could say related to gender activism. The last four days have reaffirmed the saying shared on the first day “if you are not at the table you will be on the menu”.

‘Governing’ my internet

Atieno Otieno on 4 Sep 2015
I never thought the internet to be knotty. That all I needed was my device of choice, an internet service provider and voila! Get my connection, click, click, click, open up a page, browse through it, close tab, open another, like an update, favorite a tweet, laugh at some memes and move on to the next tab. Nothing is ever that easy.

Internet governance in Africa - #AfriSIG2015 #GIGxAfrica #IGF2015

APC on 3 Sep 2015
In order to strengthen internet governance in Africa, the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) is organising a series of events to take place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, during September 2015. Follow them here.

Barriers to women’s participation on the internet evolve with increased ‘access’

Natasha Msonza on 3 Sep 2015
In the opening session at this year’s Gender and Internet Governance eXchange (gigXAfrica), participants highlighted some key questions they had that they hoped would be answered during the exchange. One participant innocently asked: if the internet is free for all, how are women really marginalized in that space? This is my attempt at a calm response to this question that I am slowly realising occupies the minds of many.

Participation in the gigX and APrIGF in Macau: Learning and experience

Sajia Afreen Smita on 8 Aug 2015
As the representative of Take Back the Tech! Bangladesh I took the opportunity to give a presentation on the topic- ‘Consent, autonomy and agency: Online violence’ from a Bangladeshi perspective. Case studies of online violence in Bangladesh, government initiatives, campaigns of Take Back the Tech! Bangladesh have been discussed in the presentation.

Ladder of Hierarchy: how gender matters in internet governance

Pinda Phisitbutra on 17 Jul 2015
In the Gender and Internet Governance Exchange (gigX) workshop last month participants from different countries in Asia were asked to arrange a series of words by the “ladder of hierarchy”. Despite our cultural differences, it seemed that we all agreed on one thing – whether married or unmarried - man is always on top.

The lifelong-learning experience of a young feminist

Christina Lopez on 14 Jul 2015
The Gender and Internet Governance Exchange-Asia (gigX) hosted by the Association for Progressive Communications in partnership with the Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA) gave me an opportunity to learn about the intersection between gender and internet governance in a simple way.

Three things I’ve learned at the Gender and Internet Governance Exchange, Asia

Noemi Lardizabal-Dado on 8 Jul 2015
Noemi Lardizabal-Dado was one of the participants in the Gender and Internet Governance Exchange in Asia. In this feminist talk, she shares how she participated with other feminists in the questioning around “what kind of internet do we want and what will it take for us to achieve it?”

Gender and Internet Governance eXchange in Asia

Flavia Fascendini on 30 Jun 2015
To start off our series of gigX, APC in collaboration with the Foundation for Media Alternatives, held a 2-day event on the 29 and 30 June 2015 where advocates from the region came together to exchange knowledge on the intersections of women’s rights and internet governance.

Pulling apart the patriarchy: Edition in commemoration of Heike Jensen

GenderIT.org on 17 Jun 2015
News of Heike Jensen’s death from cancer, on 3 February 2014, reached internet governance academic and civil society networks a year later. As Marianne Franklin, friend and colleague from GigaNet, puts it: “The networks and the hands-on work in which Heike engaged are cross-border, cross-sector and interdisciplinary by nature and predilection. This is why news of her death has been a ripple of both physical and virtual proportions.” We couldn't agree more with Franklin when she says, “All the networks, and the people who knew Heike, who worked with her are poorer for losing her, so young.” This GenderIT.org edition is in tribute to this amazing woman who contributed to our ability to question, interrogate and rebuild the institutions and architecture of the internet in more equitable ways. In the words of Sonia Randhawa, we hope that through this edition, readers will be driven not only to investigate Heike’s work more deeply, but also to engage in the deeper project of imagining, sharing and building an internet and a broader future without the shackles of patriarchy.

A legacy on how gender is built into the way we discuss and use technology

Sonia Randhawa on 17 Jun 2015
In this article, GenderIT.org talks with Anita Gurumurthy from IT For Change about gender and privacy. Anita worked with Heike in the Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society research programme.

Rendering the invisible visible: In memory of Dr Heike Jensen

Sonia Randhawa on 16 Jun 2015
Despite Heike's pessimism about the internet as it is today and the ways in which it is developing, there is a deep-seated optimism about Heike's work. She recognised that patriarchy is oppressive not just to women, but to the majority of men as well, whether due to their poverty, the colour of their skin or their sexuality. By taking apart the structures of patriarchy, uncovering the power relations that are built into the institutions and architecture of the internet, Heike consciously contributed to our ability to question, interrogate and rebuild those institutions in more equitable ways.
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