internet governance

Fatimata Seye Sylla: Not to have others speaking for us (video)

Kateřina Fialová on 7 Oct 2010
Fatimata Seye Sylla is a key figure in the Senegalese internet community. She worked for ten years within the Senegalese government, and for nine years in the private sector. She conducted the first national project to introduce ICT in the educational system. Fatimata shares with GenderIT.org why she came to Vilnius and what the IGF means to her personally and to women's rights.

Sexual rights, openness and regulatory systems

Sonia Randhawa on 7 Oct 2010
The summary of the 'Sexual rights, openness and regulatory systems' workshop co-organized by APC WNSP, Centre for Internet and Society and Alternative Law Forum at the Internet Governance Forum(IGF) in Vilnius, Lithuania on September 14 2010. T.Q. from the Lebanon EroTICs team speaks about the history of the local queer movement which correlates with the development of the internet in Lebanon. Clarissa Smith, a UK-based researcher representing the Onscenity network, examines sexuality, porn and the internet from the users point of view. Joy Liddicoat, a New Zealand Human Rights commissioner, shares her experiences and views on developing regulatory systems that recognize and realize the rights of sexual and gender minorities.

Latin America in the run-up to the IGF: global and regional synergy

Flavia Fascendini on 7 Oct 2010
The Association for Progressive Communications (APC), NUPEF and the Registry of Internet Domain Names for Latin America and the Caribbean sponsored the Third Regional Preparatory Meeting for the Internet Governance Forum (IGF), held in Ecuador in early August 2010. How might this regional meeting and the IGF impact each other? What recommendations and concerns emerged from the regional process? To what extent were gender issues represented at the Latin American meeting? Valeria Betancourt, Latin America policy coordinator for APC and Dafne Plou, regional coordinator of APC's Women's Network Support Programme (APC WNSP) in Latin America, have some answers.

Is Pakistan putting the UN Millennium Goals at risk?

Nighat Dad on 7 Oct 2010
"The discussions I witnessed at IGF 2010 really brought home to me the scale of the challenges we still face, if we are to make meaningful progress towards the goals of the IGF in general, and MDG3 in particular." Nighat Dad from the Pakistan MDG3: Take Back the Tech! project assesses the outcomes of IGF and the Millenium Development Goals in the context of national debates and women’s rights.

Africa and internet governance: going global or stay local?

Francoise Mukuku on 19 Sep 2010
The impact of internet governance on Africa was discussed on September 16th 2010, in Vilnius, Lithuania. There was fair representation of all stakeholders. Officials from South Africa, Kenya and Tunisia were there; a representative from an internet service provider; and various Africa bodies that follow the process, such as AFRINIC, ISOC Africa and CICEWA. And there were representatives from civil society - those dealing with ICT and internet, delegates from consumer’s organizations, academics from African universities, gender activists and ICT consultants as well as community based organizations.

Why we should get over facebook

ItsAllMaya on 16 Sep 2010
Social networking sites and privacy formed the main topics in two sessions Maya attended - but she found that the discussions were not grounded in research, that users were absent from the debates and tired assumptions dominated the rooms. What's needed, she argues, are more workable proposals that take into account a variety of research and based on how people actually use social networking sites - not how it's assumed they use them.

Transcript of the 'Sexual rights, openness and regulatory systems' workshop @ IGF, Lithuania, 2010

Kateřina Fialová on 14 Sep 2010
The transcript of the 'Sexual rights, openness and regulatory systems' workshop co-organized by APC WNSP, Centre for Internet and Society and Alternative Law Forum at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Vilnius, Lithuania on September 14 2010. The workshop presented opinions from various stakeholders on the competing rights and interests on the topic of sexual rights and openness. It examined the values and ways different users negotiate with internet content and risks, and the impact and potential of regulatory mechanisms in the recognition and realisation of sexual rights and gender equality.

Internet Governance Issues on Sexuality and Women's Rights

APC on 10 Sep 2010
The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) has been a challenging space for both women's rights advocates and for broader constituencies engaged in advocacy for gender equality and sexuality related rights. In the fifth and final year of its mandate, women's rights are still being dwarfed as a critical issue to be debated in this arena, while sexuality issues, although present, are not seen as a matter of rights. In preparation for this year's IGF, this briefing document highlights key issues on internet regulation that are relevant for gender equality and sexuality. It also brings to the debate findings from various research initiatives undertaken by APC and key partners, including a cross-country research initiative - <a href="http://erotics.apc.org">EROTICS</a> - that is being conducted in five countries: Brazil, India, Lebanon, South Africa and the United States.

GenderIT.org's team @ Internet Governance Forum 2010, Vilnius

GenderIT.org on 9 Sep 2010
What is the role of the internet in defending and realising women's rights and sexual rights? What are our positions as women's rights and sexual rights advocates on how the internet should be governed? From 14-17 September, the GenderIT.org team had been assisting at the Fifth Internet Governance Forum in Vilnius, Lithuania. The GenderIT Feminist Talk contributors and tweeters at the fifth IGF are Jac sm Kee (Malaysia), Jan Moolman (South Africa), Katerina Fialova (Czech Republic) and Analía Lavin (Uruguay) - from GenderIT.org and APC communications teams - and Maya Ganesh (India), Francoise Mukuku (DRC, Si Jeunesse Savait), Marina Maria (Brazil, Sexuality Policy Watch), “Nyx” (South Africa), "T. Q." (Lebanon) and Nighat Dad (Bytes For All, Pakistan) - from APC WNSP's partners on the EroTICS Research Project and MDG3:Take back the tech! project. Join the debate!

Philippines: Violence against women and ICT

Jessica Umanos Soto on 3 Aug 2010
Jessica Umanos Sotos explores why specific law is needed in the Philippines to prosecute perpetrators of violence against women through the use of ICTs or cyberspace. She argues that national ICT institutions and private companies’ policies cannot remain blind to the violations to women’s rights perpetuated via ICTs in the context of the violation of privacy rights through the illicit production and distribution of private and intimate activities. The violation of privacy rights comes in the form of sex-video scandals via telephony and internet. She also documents how, although there are no available studies on how other forms of violence such as stalking or sexual harassment and even direct threats are figuring as VAW via mobile phones, these violations are believed to be widespread

Gender divide/gap in Pan-European Dialogue on Internet Governance

hvale on 29 Jul 2010
Valentina Pellizzer, OneWorld Platform for SouthEast Europe (owpsee) executive directress, participated in this year's EuroDIG – Pan-European Dialogue on Internet Governance, and has several objections to the very visible gender gap in terms of women's participation at the event, and in the IT sector in general. Her commentary was originally written for the Diplo Internet Governance Community Blog. We carry the full text of her commentary.

Internet regulation and the Brazilian EroTICs context

Marina Maria on 2 Jun 2010
Authors Sonia Corrêa, Marina Maria and Jandira Queiroz document how gender and sexuality have been at the heart of internet regulation debates in Brazil. However, this centrality does not necessarily translate to the discourses, analysis and the political claims of social actors involved in sexual politics, on the one hand, and digital politics, on the other. In the authors' view, there is no clarity or positioning among feminists and LGBT activists regarding the ways in which gender and sexuality issues are at play in the political dynamics of internet regulation. Further no strong interaction exists between communication rights advocates and the world of sexual politics. Nevertheless the authors perceive cyber activists' commitment to privacy rights as very auspicious for sexual and reproductive rights.

Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Internet?

Nadine Moawad on 2 Jun 2010
"Clearly, one cannot speak of sexual rights activism in Lebanon without speaking at length about internet usage, as both are tied together at levels from personal identity and relationships to political activism and mobilization," claims Nadine Moawad, the APC's EroTICs project partner. In this article, she assesses the role of the internet in the rise of sexual rights activism in Lebanon, and explores connections between internet regulations and attitudes towards sexuality.

‘Does your mother know?’ Agency, risk and morality in the online lives of young women in Mumbai

Manjima Bhattacharjya on 2 Jun 2010
Manjima Bhattacharjya and Maya Ganesh, the India partner of the APC's EroTICs Project, open their input with the evocative lyrics of a Swedish pop group ABBA: “And I can chat with you baby / Flirt a little, maybe / But does your mother know that you’re out ?” This article is about middle-class women digital natives in Mumbai, the city with the highest internet use in India, and the initial impressions of their online lives as drawn from interviews and survey data gathered for the ongoing EroTICs research project.

What Is 'Harmful to Minors'? US EroTICs Partner Investigates Library Search Filters

Melissa Hope Ditmore on 2 Jun 2010
In this article, Kevicha Echols and Melissa Ditmore from Sex Work Awareness (SWA), researchers for the APC's EroTICs project, investigate the use of filters on public library computers with internet access. People in the United States (US) enjoy a great deal of access to information in print and online media due to the first amendment of the US constitution, which guarantees freedom of speech, and, thereby, its flip side, access to information. However, many people in the US, particularly youth and the economically disadvantaged (who are disproportionately people of colour), rely on school and library computers to access the internet for information, so legislation affecting information available on these computers affects their ability to access information. (Photo: Audacia Ray)
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