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Feminist Principles of the Internet [2016]

APC on 3 Oct 2016
A feminist internet works towards empowering more women and queer persons – in all our diversities – to fully enjoy our rights, engage in pleasure and play, and dismantle patriarchy. This integrates our different realities, contexts and specificities – including age, disabilities, sexualities, gender identities and expressions, socioeconomic locations, political and religious beliefs, ethnic origins, and racial markers. The following key principles are critical towards realising a feminist internet.

Your presence as a political statement: the story of Coraline Ada

Evelin Heidel - Scann on 30 Sep 2016
Interview with Coraline Ada Ehmke, best known for her exemplary work in setting up the Contributor Covenant - a code of conduct for open source projects. Coraline's life story is an inspiration for all those working for the rights of those marginalized, and their experience in free and open source software cultures. In this interview she describes the ways in which her transition has affected her career, and personal and political outlook.

Three key issues for a feminist internet: Access, agency and movements

GenderIT.org on 23 May 2016
The Feminist Principles of the Internet arose from the first Imagine a Feminist Internet meeting in 2014 in Malaysia. The meeting brought together 52 women's rights, sexual rights and internet rights activists from six continents to discuss one question: "As feminists, what kind of internet do we want, and what will it take for us to achieve it?" The principles cover the topics of access, agency, expression, economy, movements and public participation. In this edition, we have inv ted partners from our #ImagineaFeministInternet network to dive into the topics of *access, agency and movements* and weave in some of the conversations that took place at the second Imagine a Feminist Internet meeting in July 2015.

Internet control points as LGBT rights mediation

on 2 May 2016
Conflicts over lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) rights, similar to other social struggles, are increasingly materializing within technical functions of Internet governance and architecture rather than at the surface level of content.

Mobile phone treatment centre, Uber and the right to be forgotten

Tarryn Booysen on 7 Mar 2016
DJ's choice is a weekly section by GenderIT.org, exploring the depths of the web to provide you once a week with a top 5 of creative, interesting and informative pieces and resources on gender and ICTs. Delight yourself with this selection of “sparks”: Good readings, interesting links, videos, pictures, cool authors to point to, amazing tools, and much more. Send us interesting material to genderit at apcwomen.org or tweet us your links using #genderit.

From sensitisation to changing women's lives: Understanding tech-related violence in the DRC

Bianca Baldo on 20 Jan 2016
In this article, Bianca Baldo interviews Françoise Mukuku and Patience Luyeye from Si Jeunesse Savait. In partnership with the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), they carried out the research mapping technology-related violence against women in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In the interview, they elaborate on some of the findings, gaps in legislation, ambiguous role of internet services providers, and how justice is defined by survivors.

Democratic Republic of Congo: Exploring technology-related violence against women

Kateřina Fialová on 4 Jan 2016
This is the last in a series of mini editions highlighting the “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project. Each edition focuses on one country in which the research was conducted. It brings together major findings and interviews with the research teams. Drawing on three documented case studies, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) research documents some of the characteristics of online violence against women, including different routes women took in search of protection and remedies for these situations.

Finding her place: Gender at the 10th IGF

Bishakha Datta on 21 Dec 2015
A quiet sense of satisfaction. That’s what I felt at this year’s Internet Governance Forum, when gender moved out of the wings and came on to the main stage: here, there, everywhere.

The politics of sex

Kateřina Fialová on 13 Nov 2015
“For many, sexuality goes to the heart of who we are as human beings,” writes Alan Finlay, the editor of the latest Global information society watch (GISWatch) report and also the guest editor for this edition of GenderIT.org. The 2015 GISWatch brings stories on the politics of sex and sexual rights online from 52 countries worldwide. Through interviews with authors, and a selection of links to online reports, this GenderIT.org edition draws on and highlights the stories published in GISWatch, ranging from the challenges and possibilities that the internet offers to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LBGTQ) communities, to female genital mutilation, the right to legal abortions, to the rights of sex workers, criminalization of sexual expressions or sex education in schools.

GISWatch 2015: Sexual rights and the internet

on 12 Nov 2015
The Global Information Society Watch (GISWatch) 2015 presents stories from around the world on how the politics of sex and sexual rights activism takes place online. The topics of the 57 country reports gathered in this year GISWatch are diverse, ranging from the challenges and possibilities that the internet offers lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LBGTQ) communities, to female genital mutilation, the suppression of sexual rights such as same-sex marriage and the right to legal abortions, to the rights of sex workers, violence against women online, and sex education in schools.

Transhumanist technology, gender bias and feminist bosses

Tarryn Booysen on 15 Sep 2015
DJ's choice is a weekly section by GenderIT.org, exploring the depths of the web to provide you once a week with a top 5 of creative, interesting and informative pieces and resources on gender and ICTs. Delight yourself with this selection of “sparks”: Good readings, interesting links, videos, pictures, cool authors to point to, amazing tools, and much more. Send us interesting material to genderit at apcwomen.org or tweet us your links using #genderit.

The digital age: A feminist future for the queer African woman

Nyx McLean on 26 Aug 2015
Tiffany Kagure Mugo and Nyx McLean recently published an article in The IDS Bulletin, The Digital Age: A Feminist Future for the Queer African Woman. The article draws attention to digital communities and how they afford the queer African woman the space to express her lived experience.

Nudies, #FreeTheNipple and online laughter

Tarryn Booysen on 25 Aug 2015
DJ's choice is a weekly section by GenderIT.org, exploring the depths of the web to provide you once a week with a top 5 of creative, interesting and informative pieces and resources on gender and ICTs. Delight yourself with this selection of “sparks”: Good readings, interesting links, videos, pictures, cool authors to point to, amazing tools, and much more. Send us interesting material to genderit at apcwomen.org or tweet us your links using #genderit.

Google renamed, 800 sites banned and no girl wins

Tarryn Booysen on 11 Aug 2015
DJ's choice is a weekly section by GenderIT.org, exploring the depths of the web to provide you once a week with a top 5 of creative, interesting and informative pieces and resources on gender and ICTs. Delight yourself with this selection of “sparks”: Good readings, interesting links, videos, pictures, cool authors to point to, amazing tools, and much more. Send us interesting material to genderit at apcwomen.org or tweet us your links using #genderit.

Imagine a Feminist Internet: The conversation is on!

GenderIT.org on 17 Jul 2015
This year, a group of 45 activists, researchers, academics and techies are meeting again in Malaysia to deepen the discussion around feminism and technology. They will be tweeting on #imagineafeministinternet and we invite you to participate in the conversation by engaging with the hashtag and following @takebackthetech.
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