online GBV

[SPECIAL EDITION] Taking the girl's revolution online: Interview with Ghadeer Ahmed

Yara Sallam on 17 Sep 2017
Ghadeer Ahmed created Girl's Revolution on Twitter and Facebook a year after the revolution on Jan 25 2011 in Egypt. In this interview with Yara Sallam she traces the difficult and rewarding journey of talking about women's rights, body, sexuality, violence and harassment and sharing this with many other women and girls online. This interview is part of a longer one that conducted in October 2016 for EuroMedRights report "In Their Own Words". Ghadeer likes to introduce herself as a feminist writer.

[SPECIAL EDITION] Expert on my own Experience: Conversations with Neo Musangi

Namita on 13 Sep 2017
Neo Musangi is a performing and visual artist, academic and researcher. They are non-binary (preferred pronouns: they and them). In this interview Neo talks about various things – sexuality and gender based groups, the women’s movement and feminism, the role of visual and performing art and their disgruntlement with academia, being non binary openly and publicly both online and offline.

"We cannot be what we cannot see": Mapping gaps in research in gender and information society

GenderIT.org on 10 Sep 2017
The articles in this bilingual edition point to how visibility of our bodies and our stories is the starting point of a different way of being. The stories we tell of struggles and perseverance, of movements and solidarity – entangled as they are in the fine wires of technology – are necessary and essential and could be the foundations for the movement for change. This edition is not exhaustive of the gaps in the research of gender and information society, but we hope it is a starting point – a launch pad – into what has not yet been explored. Because we cannot be what we cannot see.

[SPECIAL EDITION] Observing our Observers in the Age of Social Media

Kerieva McCormick on 4 Sep 2017
Kerieva Mccormick looks at how young Roma women and girls deal with, understand, and talk about violence and harassment faced by Roma people, online and offline. This article examines the double consciousness experienced by those who live with the reality of exclusion and discrimination even now in contemporary societies, and the ways in which younger generations navigate hostility and celebrate themselves and their resilience.

IGF Best practice forum on Gender and Access (2016): Overcoming barriers to enable women's meaningful internet access

on 13 Jun 2017
The BPF is collaborating with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the UN University on Computing and Society (UNU-CS) in its important endeavour to research and map projects and initiatives that aim to address different gender digital divides around the world. The objective of this collaborative data-gathering process is to help stakeholders better understand women and girls’ diverse needs in accessing and using the Internet, promoting gender equality, and investigating how ICTs can be leveraged to empower women and girls in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Technology-mediated Violence against Women in India: Discussion paper

GenderIT.org on 9 May 2017
The purpose of this issue paper is to lay out the key legal, institutional and ethical issues concerning technology-mediated Violence against Women (VAW), to raise critical questions for further deliberation and action. This paper draws upon secondary literature in this area, and inputs from Indian feminist scholars and practitioners working in the domains of gender-based violence, women’s rights, digital rights, online violence

Did Facebook finally figure out that consent is more important than nipples?

erika on 3 May 2017
In April 2017 Facebook announced a new tool that will prevent an intimate image posted without consent from being shared further on Facebook, Messenger and Instagram. Erika Smith and Fungai Machirori go deep and debate the pros and cons of this proposed system, and how feminist-friendly and positive about alternate sexualities it is.

[COLUMN] I want to be a Pokémon master

Angélica Contreras on 13 Apr 2017
Pokémon exploded as a game that could be played on mobile phones in 2016. Of the many debates around it, Angélica Contreras explores the gendered aspect of videogames and how Pokémon struck a chord with many women in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and parts of Latin America. This article was originally written in Spanish, and is part of a column series that explores young women and their lives immersed in technology.

10 years of Take Back the Tech!

GenderIT.org on 16 Nov 2016
Technology facilitates violence against women, but it also facilitates information sharing, capacity building, networking and alternative media - Take back the tech! is the realisation of the idea that the internet can be used to expand the movement against all forms of gender-based violence. This edition brings to us the voices from the campaigns from the Democratic Republic of Congo to Canada, Bosnia-Herzegovina to India, that not only push back on the growing amounts of online VAW, but actively claim the internet as a space, a forum, a playground and a hope for women and gender non-conforming people, and also queer and trans people.

In Search of Allies: Interview with TBTT campaigners in India

Smita on 15 Nov 2016
In this set of interviews, Smita Vanniyar speaks to Japleen Pasricha of Feminism in India, and Divya Rajgopal of WhyHate. In separate ways, both these are projects of passion that find ways to reclaim technology for women and also others marginalised on account of gender non-conformity, sexuality, caste, religion and class. They discuss the pros and cons of anonymity, how to address online VAW and how to raise issues that are difficult and troublesome.

V for Vale: 10 year journey of TBTT! Campaign in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Lamia Kosovic on 14 Nov 2016
Vale Pellizzer looks back at the 10 year journey of the TBTT campaign in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The campaign has taken various shapes in the complicated realities and social dynamics of this country. The fresh and young design of the campaign promised a new hope for reclaiming your agency for women and gender non-conforming people. In this interview Vale talks about the complexities of translating a global campaign to the local realities.

At the cutting edge: TBTT campaigner Francoise Mukuku in DRC

Tarryn Booysen on 14 Nov 2016
When the TBTT campaign took off in Democratic Republic of Congo, there were few takers. Women rights' activists combatting VAW didn't understand the role ICTs could play in either propagating violence, or in activism. Now other Francophone countries approach SJS to learn more about the ways in which this cutting edge campaign is changing conversations around technology related VAW and reclaiming tech for women in the DRC.

[EDITORIAL] Taking back the tech for 10 years!

Sara Baker on 14 Nov 2016
Ten years ago it was hard to explain what is gender based violence online, while now there is some recognition of the widespread misogyny and violence that exists in online spaces towards women and gender non conforming people. It took a decade of tough, dedicated work by women all over the world that finally put technology-related violence in the spotlight. This edition is a collection of interviews with women who have taken back ownership and celebrated their power through technology in various campaigns across the globe from Bosnia-Herzegovina to Democratic Republic of Congo. Enjoy taking back the tech with us!

Feminist Principles of the Internet [2016]

APC on 3 Oct 2016
A feminist internet works towards empowering more women and queer persons – in all our diversities – to fully enjoy our rights, engage in pleasure and play, and dismantle patriarchy. This integrates our different realities, contexts and specificities – including age, disabilities, sexualities, gender identities and expressions, socioeconomic locations, political and religious beliefs, ethnic origins, and racial markers. The following key principles are critical towards realising a feminist internet.
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