online harassment

[SPECIAL EDITION] Expert on my own Experience: Conversations with Neo Musangi

Namita on 13 Sep 2017
Neo Musangi is a performing and visual artist, academic and researcher. They are non-binary (preferred pronouns: they and them). In this interview Neo talks about various things – sexuality and gender based groups, the women’s movement and feminism, the role of visual and performing art and their disgruntlement with academia, being non binary openly and publicly both online and offline.

Technology-mediated Violence against Women in India: Discussion paper

GenderIT.org on 9 May 2017
The purpose of this issue paper is to lay out the key legal, institutional and ethical issues concerning technology-mediated Violence against Women (VAW), to raise critical questions for further deliberation and action. This paper draws upon secondary literature in this area, and inputs from Indian feminist scholars and practitioners working in the domains of gender-based violence, women’s rights, digital rights, online violence

Unscripting Harassment (Part 2)

ItsAllMaya on 14 Mar 2017
Online harassment has taken various forms on the internet, including doxxing, intimate violence, stalking and so on. In this article, Part 2 of the series, Maya Ganesh explores a different way of thinking through this contemporary phenomenon by using an approach that emphasises 'design-thinking'. Possibilities that are explored include whether the system or platform can predict or respond to interactions that are escalating. However we also need to acknowledge that design, no matter how good, cannot solve social problems or harassment, but can be part of how we deal with it.

In Search of Allies: Interview with TBTT campaigners in India

Smita on 15 Nov 2016
In this set of interviews, Smita Vanniyar speaks to Japleen Pasricha of Feminism in India, and Divya Rajgopal of WhyHate. In separate ways, both these are projects of passion that find ways to reclaim technology for women and also others marginalised on account of gender non-conformity, sexuality, caste, religion and class. They discuss the pros and cons of anonymity, how to address online VAW and how to raise issues that are difficult and troublesome.

Feminist politics of freedom of speech - Reflections on session in AWID 2016

hvale on 8 Oct 2016
The discourse on technology related violence against women is often pulled into debate vis-a-vis freedom of expression. This article attempts to unpack the possibility of looking at this debate different - to articulate what is the feminist politics of free speech. Does it go beyond the protection of the right as currently imagined, to open up the possibilities of those who are marginalized, excluded and victims of violence also getting to exercise their right to free speech.

Feminist Principles of the Internet [2016]

APC on 3 Oct 2016
A feminist internet works towards empowering more women and queer persons – in all our diversities – to fully enjoy our rights, engage in pleasure and play, and dismantle patriarchy. This integrates our different realities, contexts and specificities – including age, disabilities, sexualities, gender identities and expressions, socioeconomic locations, political and religious beliefs, ethnic origins, and racial markers. The following key principles are critical towards realising a feminist internet.

Invasion of Privacy & The Murder of Qandeel Baloch

The murder of Qandeel Baloch raises many uneasy questions - about the role of media and its complicity in her death, about the persistence of patriarchy and misogyny and the forms it takes, both online and offline. Republished from Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan.

Facebook's Real Name Policy: Does it actually help to keep the online community safe?

Tarryn Booysen on 19 Jul 2016
We conducted a small survey of LGBTQIA users of Facebook and asked them what do THEY think of the real-name policy. Does this policy ensure their safety which is what Facebook claims, or does it expose them online and leave them vulnerable to harassment.

Three key issues for a feminist internet: Access, agency and movements

GenderIT.org on 23 May 2016
The Feminist Principles of the Internet arose from the first Imagine a Feminist Internet meeting in 2014 in Malaysia. The meeting brought together 52 women's rights, sexual rights and internet rights activists from six continents to discuss one question: "As feminists, what kind of internet do we want, and what will it take for us to achieve it?" The principles cover the topics of access, agency, expression, economy, movements and public participation. In this edition, we have inv ted partners from our #ImagineaFeministInternet network to dive into the topics of *access, agency and movements* and weave in some of the conversations that took place at the second Imagine a Feminist Internet meeting in July 2015.

Keeping women safe? Gender, online harassment and Indian law

on 1 May 2016
Findings of the Internet Democracy Project research study, ‘”Don’t Let It Stand!”: An Exploratory Study of Women and Verbal Online Abuse in India’, indicate that women in India develop a variety of strategies to deal with the verbal threats they face. However, these strategies very rarely include the law,resulting in a silence around questions of legal effectiveness and recourse for online verbal abuse.

From fear to courage: Talking about technology, violence and justice in Mexico

Florencia Goldsman on 23 Nov 2015
An interview by Florencia Goldsman with research report author Gabriela Polanco and APC’s project coordinator in Mexico Erika Smith explores many of the nuances that emerged from the research. From assessing to what extent technology is an enabler of violence to musing on the various meanings of ‘justice’ for survivors, this conversation takes us behind the scenes of the Mexican edition of the End violence: Women's rights and safety online project.

Barriers to women’s participation on the internet evolve with increased ‘access’

Natasha Msonza on 3 Sep 2015
In the opening session at this year’s Gender and Internet Governance eXchange (gigXAfrica), participants highlighted some key questions they had that they hoped would be answered during the exchange. One participant innocently asked: if the internet is free for all, how are women really marginalized in that space? This is my attempt at a calm response to this question that I am slowly realising occupies the minds of many.

What school girls in India can teach us about social media

Sheena D’Lima on 20 Jul 2015
In most Pune schools, the new term is under way. Activities are in full swing and tests have already begun. Students wake up as early as six in the morning and the school day hums along amidst ringing bells and slamming lockers. At the dinner table, a heated WhatsApp conversation ends only when an exasperated parent confiscates the phone. Everyone has at least one selfie on Instagram. Is it time to unfriend your elder brother yet? You know how brothers are. Somebody’s crush has just uploaded a picture of himself with a guitar. Like. Thumbs up. After dinner, it’s time for homework or bed. Phones are plugged in to charge overnight.

Looking for evidence of gender inequality in sexual harassment on Twitter

Katharina Jens on 16 Jul 2015
Twitter has been chosen for this study developed by Katharina Jens, a Media and Communication graduate from the London School of Economics and Political Science, because it has become a platform where abuse has become the most visible following the attacks of the women above. This thesis sets out to empirically provide evidence for the inequality produced online, by analysing a snap-shot of the sexual harassment a lot of women are experiencing daily on Twitter.
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