Feminist reflection on internet policies

Changing the way you see ICT

sexual rights

Queering internet governance in Indonesia

Institut Pelangi Perempuan in cooperation with Association for Progressive Communications and Ford Foundation
Institut Pelangi Perempuan in cooperation with Association for Progressive Communications and Ford Foundation on 1 September, 2014 - 17:23
0 comments | 537 reads

In Indonesia, sexuality has gradually become a more and more open public discourse. Conflict on discourse of sexuality expands through the use of Internet. On the one hand, internet has given space to the advancement of human rights including human rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer (LGBTIQ). On the other hand, the technology creates a space, which preserves status quo, discrimination and violence against LGBTIQ that has previously been evident in offline spaces. Harassment and homophobic bullying, which include online delivery of hate speech against the LGBTIQ referred to as cyber-homophobia is among the behaviors appearing in social network and other cyber spaces. The blockade of LGBTIQ websites by several Internet Service Providers (ISP) has been happening since 2011. The act is often a one-sided decision without prior notification to owner of website. More often than not, the process is committed by both ISP and Ministry of Communication and Informatics Republic of Indonesia, without a transparent and accountable consultation to the owner of the website. In response to such situation, in 2012, LGBTIQ activists began advocating Human Rights of LGBTIQ in the area of internet management. These activists include Institut Pelangi Perempuan (IPP), Ourvoice (OV), Arus Pelangi and Gamacca. The social movement and process of advocacy against cyber-homophobia and the decision to close LGBTIQ websites in Indonesia then become a movement introduced as “Queering Internet Governance in Indonesia.”

 

Tools and Tactics for the LGBTI community in sub-Saharan Africa

Tactical Tech
Tactical Tech on 1 September, 2014 - 14:05
0 comments | 600 reads

Tactical Tech is delighted to announce the launch of a new guide: Tools and Tactics for the LGBTIi community in sub-Saharan Africa. This is the second in our series of Security in-a-boxi Community Focus guides, which aim to further integrate digital security into the context of particular communities and human rightsi defenders.

 

EROTICS, activism and feminist porn

Caroline Tagny
Caroline Tagny on 9 May, 2014
0 comments | 427 reads
GenderIT.org

Caroline Tagny interviewed Rohini Lashkané, who used to work with EROTICSi India, and Sheena Magenya, from the Coalition of African Lesbians during the Global meeting on gender, sexuality and the interneti in April 2014 to ask them how they understand pornographyi from their respective contexts, and how do they engage their activism with the intersection between sexual rightsi and internet rights.

You shall no longer be strange, internet

Nadine Moawad
Nadine Moawad on 20 August, 2014 - 13:57 on 20 August, 2014 - 13:57
Nadine is the EROTICS project coordinator. Activist, blogger, organizer, techie, high school teacher, feminist, leftist, secularist, works on gender and sexuality, she is based in Lebanon and tweets at @nmoawad

I’d bet my internet that one of your first experiences with the digital social had something to do with sex. Unsolicited nudity arriving in your inbox? Hundreds of sex-related IRC channels that popped up while you searched for your local radio chatroom? Pop-ups spiraling out of control on Internet Explorer?

Or maybe you went looking for it in a Lycos search. Or maybe you built a geocities site with gifs and midi music and a sparkling background over which you (barely visibly) wrote something about sex.

I’d bet my internet that one of your first experiences with the digital social had something to do with sex. Unsolicited nudity arriving in your inbox? Hundreds of sex-related IRC channels that popped up while you searched for your local radio chatroom? Pop-ups spiraling out of control on Internet Explorer? Or maybe you went looking for it in a Lycos search. Or maybe you built a geocities site with gifs and midi music and a sparkling background over which you (barely visibly) wrote something about sex. Or maybe it was you who would connect to the #0!!!!!!!!girls_love_sex IRC channel on Dalnet back when hashtags were rooms and not keywords.

Feminist Principles of the Internet

APC and contributors
APC and contributors on 19 August, 2014
0 comments | 3528 reads
GenderIT.org

Over three days, the participants discussed and debated intersections of gender, sexuality, and the internet – not only as a tool – but as a new public space. In thinking through these issues, the participants at the meeting developed a set of 15 feminist principles of the internet. These are designed to be an evolving document that informs our work on gender and technology, as well as influences our policy-making discussions when it comes to internet governance.

Gender, sexuality and the internet

Posted 20 August, 2014 - 12:52

Have we taken over the internet or has it taken us over? Are we using or being used by the internet? How can we resist the globalised commodification of the internet and defend it as open, diffused, decentralised and subversive? Is the divide between our online and offline lives blurring? Is this empowering or threatening? Many fascinating questions that look not for a definite and absolute answer, but to be debated in a frame of respect of women’s and sexual rights, online and offline.

In last April, Malaysia was the backdrop for academics, feminist and queer activists, and internet rights and policy specialists from diverse organisations and networks coming from many different countries to reflect on and analyse contentious issues of gender, sexuality and the internet. Most of the material featured in this edition draws on those debates and takes them further. We proudly introduce the evolving Feminist Principles of the Internet drafted with the participation of many activists, and the first research outputs from the “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online project” highlighted in the resources section. We hope that the articles and resources offered in this GenderIT.org edition trigger your curiosity, and expand your exploration of gender, sexuality and online environments.

More articles on the Global meeting on gender, sexuality and the internet

Have we taken over the internet or has it taken us over? Are we using or being used by the internet? How can we resist the globalised commodification of the internet and defend it as open, diffused, decentralised and subversive? Is the divide between our online and offline lives blurring? Is this empowering or threatening? Many fascinating questions that look not for a definite and absolute answer, but to be debated in a frame of respect of women’s and sexual rights, online and offline.

Sex, rights and the internet: Survey on internet regulation and sexual rights

EROTICS
EROTICS on 14 August, 2014 - 14:59
0 comments | 659 reads

If you are an LGBTi activist, SRHR activist, women's rightsi activist, a queeri blogiger or a feminist who spends a lot of time on the interneti, please take 15 minutes to fill in our survey. We hope with this second round of our global monitoring survey to deepen our understanding on the connections between the regulationi of sexual speech and content on the internet and provide evidence that will help sexual rightsi activists explain the impact of such regulation on their lives and their work.

Marginalised desires and the internet

Nyx McLean
Nyx McLean on 12 August, 2014
0 comments | 379 reads
Nyx McLean is a researcher specialising in gender, sexuality and digital communities. She is currently working on her PhD which explores how the LGBTIAQ community in South Africa uses the internet as a counter public.
GenderIT.org

This article explores marginalised desires and the need individuals have to express these desires online, especially when it may not be safe to do so offline. Attention is brought to the need to protect individuals’ rights to engage in sharing content and expressing their desires online; and the need for digital security to protection their data and identities. The article also discusses notions of identity, community and the need to form safe spaces (including the need to report violence experienced online).

Video: Feminist talks on a feminist internet

FF and CT
FF and CT on 12 May, 2014 - 18:25
0 comments | 2888 reads

During APC's Global Meeting on Gender, Sexuality and the Interneti where we explored our collective understanding of what a feminist internet looks like, we asked participants to tell us their vision of a feminist internet.

Imagining a digitally secure, feminist internet

Rohini Lakshané
Rohini Lakshané on 9 May, 2014 - 14:55
0 comments | 657 reads
Rohini Lakshané is the editor of EROTICS India, a former technology journalist and a Wikipedian. Her core interests include 'openness', technology for good and online civil liberties.

This is the second in a series of posts reporting on the Global Meeting on Gender, Sexuality and the Interneti held in Port Dickson, Malaysia from April 13 to 17, 2014, to envision a feminist internet and to evolve a framework for it. Around 50 activists working on gender irights, sexual rightsi and Internet rights iin different parts of the world had come together for the meeting.

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