violence against women

[COLUMN] How women in the global south are RECLAIMING SOCIAL MEDIA to combat femicide

Samukelisiwe Mabaso on 8 Jun 2017
In this new column on reclaiming social media for addressing women's issues and feminist concerns, Samukelisiwe Mabaso begins by looking at the rising rates of femicide in South Africa (and other parts of the world). Various spontaneous movements led and powered by women have arisen and use technology and social media to amplify their voices and ensure their demands are met.

Feminist Principles of the Internet [2016]

APC on 3 Oct 2016
A feminist internet works towards empowering more women and queer persons – in all our diversities – to fully enjoy our rights, engage in pleasure and play, and dismantle patriarchy. This integrates our different realities, contexts and specificities – including age, disabilities, sexualities, gender identities and expressions, socioeconomic locations, political and religious beliefs, ethnic origins, and racial markers. The following key principles are critical towards realising a feminist internet.

Trafficking in Women: female objectification

Vera Vieira on 30 Sep 2016
A conservative estimate is that 42 million people are prostituted worldwide, of which 90% are exploited by pimps, and every year 2 million people are added to this number. Latin America has 10% of trafficking in persons for sexual activities - nearly half of the victims are children and youth under 18 years. Human trafficking is considered the third most profitable form of crime in the world, losing only to drugs and weapon trafficking, and increasingly social media and networks of trust are being used for recruitment.

The reality of getting online in Jamaica: How mobile phones and social media lead to violence against women

GenderIT.org on 20 Apr 2016
According to the research report “Violence against women and the use of information and communications technologies in Jamaica”, there is insufficient recognition of the relationships between information and communications technologies and violence against women in the country, and VAW in its many forms continues to be a serious problem. To know more about the Jamaican context and the research, GenderIT.org interviewed one of the authors of the report, Dhanaraj Thakur.

Virtual reality pornography and tech-related violence against women: To boldly go have sex where no one has done it before!

Bianca Baldo on 4 Apr 2016
The impact of virtual reality porn is relatively unknown but it might be a game changer.

Kiddle, big data and anonymity

Tarryn Booysen on 22 Mar 2016
DJ's choice is a weekly section by GenderIT.org, exploring the depths of the web to provide you once a week with a top 5 of creative, interesting and informative pieces and resources on gender and ICTs. Delight yourself with this selection of “sparks”: Good readings, interesting links, videos, pictures, cool authors to point to, amazing tools, and much more. Send us interesting material to genderit at apcwomen.org or tweet us your links using #genderit.

Violence against women and the use of information and communications technologies in Jamaica

on 10 Mar 2016
Existing research points out that a large number of women and girls in Jamaica suffer from gender based violence. In fact, violence against women (VAW) is a problem throughout the Caribbean region. There is a lack of research in Jamaica on the topic of violence against women and the use of information and communications technologies that can inform policy-makers and those in support services. This research project addresses that gap through the collection of empirical data that included a national survey of Internet users, interviews with survivors of abuse, focus groups, and expert interviews.

Balancing rights and interests: Best practices to counter online abuse and violence

Flavia Fascendini on 7 Mar 2016
The IGF Best Practice Forum on Online Abuse and Gender-Based Violence Against Women took place in Joao Pessoa, Brazil in November 2015. Representatives of civil society, academia and the private sector went through some of the key highlights and recommendations from the BPF but opened it up at different junctures for inputs and responses.

New Challenges to Freedom of Expression: Countering Online Abuse of Female Journalists

on 13 Feb 2016
This report provides recommendations by the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media, on how participating States, media organizations and intermediaries can assist in ensuring that female journalists and media actors can work without fear and exercise their human right to freedom of expression.

Technology-related violence against women in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Si Jeunesse Savait on 20 Jan 2016
This report emerges from research carried out in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) between November 2013 and April 2014 by Si Jeunesse Savait and the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) as part of a multi-country project entitled “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online”. Mobile phones had been the most frequently involved platform in the cases of technology-related VAW explored by the local research team. In all three of the cases, the survivors were victim to multiple acts of violence, either by the same person or different people who, for the most part, were in better control of the technology than the victims.

From sensitisation to changing women's lives: Understanding tech-related violence in the DRC

Bianca Baldo on 20 Jan 2016
In this article, Bianca Baldo interviews Françoise Mukuku and Patience Luyeye from Si Jeunesse Savait. In partnership with the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), they carried out the research mapping technology-related violence against women in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In the interview, they elaborate on some of the findings, gaps in legislation, ambiguous role of internet services providers, and how justice is defined by survivors.

From unawareness to women coming forward when under attack: Technology-related violence against women in Kenya

Tarryn Booysen on 20 Jan 2016
Kenya was one of seven countries covered under the Association for Progressive Communication’s End violence: Women’s rights and safety online research project. Here, GenderIT.org writer Tarryn Booysen speaks to the research team, giving us a closer look into the research findings.

IGF 2015 Best Practice Forum: Online Abuse and Gender-Based Violence Against Women Report

on 12 Jan 2016
The 2015 IGF Best Practice Forum (BPF) on Online Abuse and Gender-Based Violence Against Women used an open and inclusive process to gather a broad variety of views and inputs on this multidimensional problem over nine months. As a result of this community-driven process, the BPF’s draft findings reflect a rich diversity of responses from various stakeholders and regions regarding the issue.

Kenya: Exploring technology-related violence against women

Flavia Fascendini on 12 Jan 2016
This is the sixth in a series of mini editions highlighting the “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project. Each edition focuses on one country in which the research was conducted, and brings together major findings, and interviews with the research teams. Drawing on four documented case studies, the Kenya research documents the local characteristics of online violence against women, including an exploration of the policy and political background of the situation around technology-related violence. In the research some interesting themes/trends were picked up and some valuable recommendations were made.

General recommendation on women’s access to justice from the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women

GenderIT.org on 11 Jan 2016
In 2015, APC's Women's Rights Programme did advocacy work with the members of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) who are leading the development of the new general recommendations. One of these is the General Recommendation on Access to Justice. Influencing the language of the document in terms of how to incorporate ICTs in the draft was one of the main outcomes of this advocacy effort.
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