women's rights

Intersectional barriers to internet access: Gender and disability

Becky Band Jain on 28 Mar 2016
No group of individuals has been as severely restricted, with respect to their reproductive rights, as women with disabilities. Located overwhelmingly in the global South, where most disabled people live, women with disabilities encounter levels of multidimensional discrimination that are unparalleled by other groups in the world.

Women's rights online: Translating access into empowerment

on 11 Mar 2016
New research by the Web Foundation shows that the dramatic spread of mobile phones is not enough to get women online, or to achieve empowerment of women through technology. The study, based on a survey of thousands of poor urban men and women across nine developing countries, found that while nearly all women and men own a phone, women are still nearly 50% less likely to access the internet than men in the same communities, with Internet use reported by just 37% of women surveyed. Once online, women are 30-50% less likely than men to use the internet to increase their income or participate in public life.

Diversity, gender, and rights: All videos from IGF 2015 in one place

Flavia Fascendini on 16 Dec 2015
Flavia Fascendini put together the videos from all discussions at the IGF 2015 which concerned gender issues, women's and sexual rights, bringing forward the Feminist Principles of the Internet.

Gender and technology have been increasingly recognised as a human rights issue

Paz Peña O. on 10 Dec 2015
Between the belligerence of the "Gamer Gate" (the controversy regarding the last UN report on violence against women), and a very uncommon Stockholm Internet Forum who in its last session, focussed on gender issues, the context for the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Joao Pessoa was a very interesting opportunity to see how gender would be addressed in the most important internet forum of the world.

What does internet policy mean for the average Ugandan?

Kembabazi Gloria on 3 Dec 2015
The word “internet” is not well understood in its full and wholesome context by a size-able number of Ugandans and perhaps the majority. Smart phone usage has grown tremendously and with it the gospel of this thing called the internet. Of course with smart phones come the popularisation of social media and the applications that simplify internet use and access. It would seem that internet familiarisation has grown with these new gadgets.

What do women expect for this 10th IGF?

Flavia Fascendini on 7 Nov 2015
GenderIT.org asked many of the participants in the Gender and Internet Governance eXchanges (gigX) from three different regions what they expected for this year's 10th Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Brazil, in terms of women's and sexual rights, gender, and internet governance.

Women actively join internet governance discussions

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 4 Nov 2015
Little by little, the number of women participating in the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) has increased significantly, and their presence in panels and workshops and as participants has brought new insights into the discussion of the different matters that are key in IGF debates.

Women’s rights, gender and Internet governance

APC on 30 Oct 2015
This issue paper addresses the degree to which gender and women’s rights feature in Internet1 governance, in multiple interconnected ways including, but certainly not limited to, access, content and representation. Gender and women’s rights occupy a largely rhetorical role in today’s discussion of Internet governance.

Statement: Facts on #TakeBacktheTech

APC on 12 Oct 2015
The attack against APC and Take Back the Tech and efforts to hijack the #takebackthetech hashtag, which has involved people who self-associate with #Gamergate posting threats targeting members of our community and images that depict women being subjected to physical and sexual violence, illustrate how women’s and girls’ voices are silenced on social networking platforms by violent and sexist expression.

Meha Jouini: The internet has allowed me to publicly express my identity as an Amazigh woman activist

Leila Nachawati Rego on 1 Oct 2015
Maha Jouini is an Addis Ababa-based Tunisian blogger, and women’s rights and indigenous rights activist, with a special focus on the Amazigh community. APC’s Leila Nachawati met Meha in Addis Ababa during the African School on Internet Governance (AfriSIG) in September and here is what they talked about.

Imagine a Feminist Internet: Reflections on freedom of expression and mysoginistic online content

Dhyta Caturani on 20 Sep 2015
This video by Dhyta Caturani from Engage Media features Sheena Magenya and Naomi Fontanos speaking about online mysoginistic content and its relation to freedom of expression, while attending the second Imagine a Feminist Internet in Malaysia, July 2015.

Uganda urgently needs to prioritise gender equality online

Irene Murungi on 19 Sep 2015
Ahead of the launch of our Women’s Rights Online research, this series of guest blogs features on-the-ground perspectives from each of our research partners around the world. In this post, Irene Murungi, Gender Policy Officer at Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET), talks about why it’s important to get more Ugandan women online and involved in internet policy debates.

An intersectional take on technology, rights and justice

Beatrice Martini on 30 Aug 2015
There’s a word – which is an entire multi-faceted concept in itself – which comes to my mind very often, whether I’m reading the news, working, talking with loved ones or following someone’s train of thoughts online. Intersectionality.

Imagine a Feminist Internet: The conversation is on!

GenderIT.org on 17 Jul 2015
This year, a group of 45 activists, researchers, academics and techies are meeting again in Malaysia to deepen the discussion around feminism and technology. They will be tweeting on #imagineafeministinternet and we invite you to participate in the conversation by engaging with the hashtag and following @takebackthetech.

Ladder of Hierarchy: how gender matters in internet governance

Pinda Phisitbutra on 17 Jul 2015
In the Gender and Internet Governance Exchange (gigX) workshop last month participants from different countries in Asia were asked to arrange a series of words by the “ladder of hierarchy”. Despite our cultural differences, it seemed that we all agreed on one thing – whether married or unmarried - man is always on top.
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