Feminist reflection on internet policies

Changing the way you see ICT

Feminist Talk

DELETE, UNDO, RETRIEVE: Statement on the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012

Women's Legal Bureau
Women's Legal Bureau on 10 October, 2012 - 13:57
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The Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau (WLB) is a feminist legal non-government organization from Philippines composed of women’s rights activists and advocates.

The stateiment developed by the Women's Legal Bureau (WLB) in response to the Cybercrimei Bill. WLB highlights the specific women's rightsi concerns in relation to the bill, in particular warn that the law can be used to further perpetuate violence against womeni. They are still in the process of gathering support and you are invited to sign on to show your support to the cause.

A little red dot on a map points to a significant debate

GenderIT.org
GenderIT.org on 3 October, 2012 - 17:49
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Post constructed collaboratively between several team members of the Association for Progressive Communication (APC).

A Feminist talk entry published in GenderIT.orgi (in Portuguese) started an interesting exchange related to the complex fields of freedom of expressioni, censorshipi, hate speech, legal remedies, and ICTi related violence against womeni. You must be asking yourself what it was about, in order to start such a complex debate. Well, it all starts with a map.

The hack of Uganda’s government websites: Anonymous could do better

Melanie Nathan for Oblogdeeoblogda.me
Melanie Nathan for Oblogdeeoblogda.me on 27 August, 2012 - 15:59
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Melanie Nathan is a human rights advocate who writes and speaks about ending prejudice and discrimination against sexuality minorities. In her advocacy work she focus primarily on LGBT issues in United States of America and Africa.

Uganda’s Governmenti websites were hacked and defaced earlier this month. The hacksters asserted that their actions were to protest the Ugandan Government persecution of the LGBTIi community of Uganda where being gay is considered criminal and where legislation is pending Uganda’s parliament that would impose harsh prison penalties on gay people, including the death sentence for so called “aggravated homosexuality.” Melanie Nathan, an activists who write extensively about LGBT Uganda, notes that the actions of Anonymous may have caused more harm than good to the Ugandan LGBT Community.

Rape and the courts: Going online isn't really justice

Sonia Randhawa
Sonia Randhawa on 12 August, 2012 - 02:56
0 comments | 1296 reads
Sonia Randhawa is a former GenderIT.org editor currently doing a PhD on women journalists in Malaysia in the 1990s. She lives in Melbourne, Australia, but still calls Malaysia home.

Savannah Dietrich was raped. The rapists took photographs and circulated them at her school - but in a plea bargain, she was told that she was not allowed to tell people what had happened. She posted the names of her attackers on social media sites, risking a jail sentence and a fine. But is this justice?

It's violent, it's misogynist. Something needs to be done, but what?

Sonia Randhawa
Sonia Randhawa on 16 July, 2012 - 11:20
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Sonia Randhawa is a former GenderIT.org editor currently doing a PhD on women journalists in Malaysia in the 1990s. She lives in Melbourne, Australia, but still calls Malaysia home.

For those of you that don't know the appalling vitriol that Anita Sarkeesian has been subject to, you can read a summary of it here. It's worrying that there are people out there who are capable of perpetrating this campaign of hatred. But what's more worrying is that we don't seem to know what to do about it.

Copyright and the digital divide

Sonia Randhawa
Sonia Randhawa on 5 July, 2012 - 11:17
0 comments | 1340 reads
Sonia Randhawa is a former GenderIT.org editor currently doing a PhD on women journalists in Malaysia in the 1990s. She lives in Melbourne, Australia, but still calls Malaysia home.

It's day two of the 'Informal' Asia Europe Foundation meeting on human rights and ICTsi, and we're split up into workshops to discuss recommendations that will go to the Foundation's ministerial meeting in November: I'm in the workshop on digital dividei. While a lot of interesting ideas came up during the course of the day, the one which causes me most concern is the problem of knowledge that is being locked away, often without reason.

Flash Mob Korean Style

Sonia Randhawa, with help from Gayathry Venkiteswaran
Sonia Randhawa, with help from Gayathry Venkiteswaran on 28 June, 2012 - 13:46
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Sonia Randhawa is a former GenderIT.org editor currently doing a PhD on women journalists in Malaysia in the 1990s. She lives in Melbourne, Australia, but still calls Malaysia home.

In Seoul for the Asia Europe Foundation's Informal Meeting on Human Rightsi, looking at human rights and ICTsi, I made a few extra-curricular stops - it was hard not to, when just outside our hotel is an ongoing protest about labour rights. The protest site has obviously been occupied for some time - they are even growing tomato plants - and is just outside a major tourist attraction. The protest involves workers who were laid off from three major corporations, all still profitable. One of the companies, Ssang-Yong, over 2,600 people were fired, and because of their economic desperation 22 took the drastic step of committing suicide.

Internet improves access to health care for sex workers in the Olympics area of London

KF
KF on 21 June, 2012 - 09:03
0 comments | 2011 reads

The challenge of doing sexual health outreach work in East London has been transformed by police action in the run up to the Olympics. APC member GreenNet answered Open Doors Sexual Health Clinic’s request for a new website that could speak clearly to east London sexworkers with advice and resources.

Censorship in South Africa: Protecting or policing?

Sonia Randhawa
Sonia Randhawa on 18 June, 2012 - 12:44
0 comments | 3038 reads
Sonia Randhawa is a former GenderIT.org editor currently doing a PhD on women journalists in Malaysia in the 1990s. She lives in Melbourne, Australia, but still calls Malaysia home.

The Spear is a painting that depicts the African National Congress leader and South African president Jacob Zuma in a rallying pose, with genitals exposed. It has caused controversy and been defaced. Images of the painting have gone viral on interneti. In late May 2012, the South African Film and Publications Board classified the painting, as "16N" - not suitable for people under the age of 16 because it contains nudity. But in a country where one in four women is raped, Sonia Randhawa wonders just who the ban is supposed to protect.

Equality, non-interference, non-hierarchy: What the net should be

Sonia Randhawa
Sonia Randhawa on 24 May, 2012 - 11:32
0 comments | 1581 reads
Sonia Randhawa is a former GenderIT.org editor currently doing a PhD on women journalists in Malaysia in the 1990s. She lives in Melbourne, Australia, but still calls Malaysia home.

The UN Special Rapporteur on cultural rights Farida Shaheed made an important speech on internet governancei in Geneva earlier in May 2012. She stressed the importance of upholding human rightsi principles online supporting the call of civil society for democratization of interneti governance. Sonia Randhawa is urging all of us to not just look at what Farida Shaheed says, but also to take a look at the ways in which you personally and your organisation, if you have one, can and really need to get involved in these debates

Digital Security: Drop-in centre of Ugandan sex worker organisation raided

Frederic Dubois for APCNews
Frederic Dubois for APCNews on 17 May, 2012 - 06:57
0 comments | 1332 reads

“Sex work may be illegal in Uganda, but providing services for sex workers is clearly not,” reads a stateiment put out on May 9 by WONETHA, a health and human rightsi organisation, in reaction to a serious crack-down on its activities by Ugandan municipal police.

May 17 | World Internet Day & IDAHO | What does internet freedom mean to you?

ES for Takebackthetech.net
ES for Takebackthetech.net on 17 May, 2012 - 05:27
0 comments | 1909 reads

May 17 marks two important causes: The International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHO)and World Interneti Day. Join us and play Twitter tag to connect your rights on May 17th. Help activists in your communities - geographically or issue-based - to connect with other activists who might know about IDAHO or internet rights ibut might not see them as interconnected or even know each other. Broaden your community of activist friends on Twitter at the same time.

Anonymity, accountability and the public sphere

Jac sm Kee
Jac sm Kee on 16 May, 2012 - 20:38
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Jac is the focal point for APC WNSP's work on women's rights. She coordinates the EroTICS research (Exploratory Research on Sexuality and the Internet) and APC's "Take Back The Tech!" campaign.

I found myself being confronted with the issue of anonymity and accountability in different ways at the AWID Forum. At the Feminist Tech Exchange (FTX) and Connect Your Rights events that took place just before the Forum, we discussed about the different and increasingly sophisticated ways that interneti technologies have been used to erode any sense of anonymity online.

Bargain basement shopping in the information society

Erika Smith
Erika Smith on 15 May, 2012 - 11:19
0 comments | 2549 reads
Erika is based in Mexico and is the membership and network development coordinator for the Association for Progressive Communications Women´s Networking Support Programme.

When I saw this quote on Mozilla's new Collusion website: "If you're not paying for something, you're not the customer; you're the product being sold - Andrew Lewis." I felt it summed up the economics tool boxi session on Commodification of Knowledge that APC led at the 2012 AWID Forum quite nicely. The session, organised by APC, brought together speakers to spark debate and reflection, but the audience vibrated with insights and was full of feminists eager to deepen discussion on the commodification of knowledge.

Taking street harassment off the streets and off the map!

Erika Smith
Erika Smith on 14 May, 2012 - 17:10
0 comments | 3500 reads
Erika is based in Mexico and is the membership and network development coordinator for the Association for Progressive Communications Women´s Networking Support Programme.

I walked in late to the jam-packed session “Bringing Gender ito the Streets: Young Women Amidst the Arab Uprisings” at AWID Forum 2012. This was not a session about technology or the interneti, but it was a common strand running through each presenters' activism and evidence-building for women's rightsi, even and perhaps especially in the midst of revolution.

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