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Gender Assessments and Research

Mexico: Exploring technology-related violence against women

By Gabriela Polanco for the "End violence: Women's rights and safety online project" and Richa Kaul Padte (report summary author)

The report "From impunity to justice: Exploring technology-related violence against women in Mexico" reflects research carried out in Mexico between November 2013 and April 2014. Comprising an in-depth analysis of four case studies, a mapping of the socio-legal landscape, and an assessment of the policies of internet and telephony companies, the report highlights women’s voices and provides a series of recommendations to better address the issue of technology-related violence against women in Mexico.

Analysis of incidents reported on the “Take Back the Tech!” Ushahidi platform

By Association for Progressive Communications

This report provides an overview of data concerning violence against women (VAW) online collected using the Association for Progressive Communications' (APC) online mapping tool. The purpose of the mapping tool, which was set up as part of APC's “End Violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project, was to improve APC’s existing framework for categorising online rights violations, and develop a deeper understanding of the nature and consequences of technology-related VAW. This report is intended primarily as a quantitative overview of the cases reported, with some qualitative illustration. The data is analysed from 2012 to mid-2014.

Research design: Exploring corporate and state remedies for technology-related violence against women

By Rima Athar and Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau, Inc.

Between April 2013 and June 2014, the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) carried out a multi-country research entitled „From impunity to justice“ as the part of its project End violence: Women's rights and safety online. The research involved the collection of case studies that highlight the voices and experiences of women from the global south who have faced technology-related VAW. The research design document outlines theoretical framework, research methodology, and instruments used in the research.

Bosnia and Herzegovina: Exploring technology-related violence against women

By OWPSEE for the "End violence: Women's rights and safety online project" and Richa Kaul Padte (report summary author)

This report emerges from research carried out in Bosnia and Herzegovina between July 2013 and April 2014 by One World Platform for South East Europe (OWPSEE) and the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) as part of a seven-country project entitled “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online”.

Pakistan: Violence against Women and ICT

Asia-Pacific, South & Central Asia

Access to mobile technology is increasing rapidly in Pakistan, and women are also gaining access, albeit at a slower rate than men. Kyla Pasha examines how mobile technology is ripe for use in strategies of empowerment, as long as access to technology is accompanied by training and orientation.

Because I am a girl: Digital and urban frontiers 2010

By Nikki van der Gaag Global

The report focuses on the lives of adolescents in two of the current scenarios of faster growth: the urban environment and the digital world. Both have new opportunities for girls and young women but also risks that have hardly been investigated and regulated. Prejudice and poverty exclude millions of girls from taking advantages of the transformative possibilities that cities and information and ICTs can offer. The 2010 'Because I am a Girl' brings lots of exciting examples from around the world that ICTs open up for girls in terms of learning, networking, campaigning and personal development, such as girls tweeting to amplify their voices in global discussions on women’s rights. The report has also interesting and context specific recommendations on how to enhance girls access to science and technology.

Congo: Violence against Women and Information Communication Technologies

By Sylvie Niombo, with Ella Mouelhet and Herman Malanda contributing Africa

In Congo, Sylvie Niombo explores the intersection of VAW and ICTs, where mobile phone use appears to be the primary vehicle used to perpetrate VAW using ICTs. SMS and phone calls are used by some men to harass women and girls. Male monitoring of women’s use of mobile phones leads to blurring of privacy issues and power relations between men and women are reflected by who has the resources to buy cell phones. Mobile phones are also used by young people to disseminate pictures of naked girls.

Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC): Violence against women and ICT

By Sylvie Niombo with contributions by Josepha Pumbulu, Esquire and Philomène Mukendi Africa

In the context of a country with one of the world's worst human rights records, women and girls are the victims of sexual violence perpetrated mostly by combatants from both sides. However, Sylvie Niombo finds in this paper that the intersections between violence against women and girls and ICTs in the DRC are not well established. The internet makes it possible to share experiences and receive information to advance the cause of women’s rights but can facilitate violence towards Congolese women and girls. A lack of confidence in the legal system and the strong presence of men in the judiciary make women unlikely to seek help from the courts, but there is growing mobilisation of women and human rights organisations in the fight to end violence against women (VAW) in partnership with the United Nations and international organisations.

Philippines: Violence against women and ICT

By Jessica Umanos Soto Asia-Pacific

Jessica Umanos Sotos explores why specific law is needed in the Philippines to prosecute perpetrators of violence against women through the use of ICTs or cyberspace. She argues that national ICT institutions and private companies’ policies cannot remain blind to the violations to women’s rights perpetuated via ICTs in the context of the violation of privacy rights through the illicit production and distribution of private and intimate activities. The violation of privacy rights comes in the form of sex-video scandals via telephony and internet. She also documents how, although there are no available studies on how other forms of violence such as stalking or sexual harassment and even direct threats are figuring as VAW via mobile phones, these violations are believed to be widespread

Mexico, Argentina, Brazil and Colombia: Cross-country Study on Violence against Women and Information Communication Technologies

By María Isabel Davidziuk and María Alejandra Davidziuk Argentina, Brazil, Columbia, Latin America, Mexico

María Isabel and María Alejandra Davidziuk compare the findings of four national reports from Mexico, Brazil, Argentina and Colombia undertaken as part of the APC WNSP project “Strengthening women’s strategic use of ICTs to combat violence against women and girls”. In their analysis they look at some barriers (both institutional and cultural) that need to be overcome in order for ICTs to be successfully used to decrease violence against women and girls.