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Gender Assessments and Research

Sexuality, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Internet

Global

What are the relationships and interdependencies influencing the promises of being online: voice, visibility, and power? This ARROW for Change (AFC) issue on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and the internet documents some of these dynamics.

Use of mobile phones by the rural poor; Gender perspectives from selected Asian countries

By Gerard Sylvester, editor Indonesia, Sri Lanka

Acknowledging the differences in perceptions between genders, and between urban and rural dwellers, what must be realized is that these differences are often not unique to aspects related to the mobile phone. The concerns, needs, and benefits ascribed to the mobile phone are more a reflection of people’s existing societal, familial, and gender norms prevalent in their environments, rather than having been elicited by the mobile phone. From the perception of the study participants, the phone is an enabler of extant human need and desire.

Mexico: Exploring technology-related violence against women

By Gabriela Polanco for the "End violence: Women's rights and safety online project" and Richa Kaul Padte (report summary author)

The report "From impunity to justice: Exploring technology-related violence against women in Mexico" reflects research carried out in Mexico between November 2013 and April 2014. Comprising an in-depth analysis of four case studies, a mapping of the socio-legal landscape, and an assessment of the policies of internet and telephony companies, the report highlights women’s voices and provides a series of recommendations to better address the issue of technology-related violence against women in Mexico.

End violence: Women's rights and technology-related violence in Colombia

By Colnodo for APC "End violence: Women's rights and safety online" project

This report describes research carried out by Colnodo in Colombia between February and May 2014 as part of an Association for Progressive Communications (APC) project covering seven countries, titled End violence: Women's rights and safety online.

Analysis of incidents reported on the “Take Back the Tech!” Ushahidi platform

By Association for Progressive Communications

This report provides an overview of data concerning violence against women (VAW) online collected using the Association for Progressive Communications' (APC) online mapping tool. The purpose of the mapping tool, which was set up as part of APC's “End Violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project, was to improve APC’s existing framework for categorising online rights violations, and develop a deeper understanding of the nature and consequences of technology-related VAW. This report is intended primarily as a quantitative overview of the cases reported, with some qualitative illustration. The data is analysed from 2012 to mid-2014.

Research design: Exploring corporate and state remedies for technology-related violence against women

By Rima Athar and Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau, Inc.

Between April 2013 and June 2014, the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) carried out a multi-country research entitled „From impunity to justice“ as the part of its project End violence: Women's rights and safety online. The research involved the collection of case studies that highlight the voices and experiences of women from the global south who have faced technology-related VAW. The research design document outlines theoretical framework, research methodology, and instruments used in the research.

Bosnia and Herzegovina: Exploring technology-related violence against women

By OWPSEE for the "End violence: Women's rights and safety online project" and Richa Kaul Padte (report summary author)

This report emerges from research carried out in Bosnia and Herzegovina between July 2013 and April 2014 by One World Platform for South East Europe (OWPSEE) and the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) as part of a seven-country project entitled “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online”.

The 'Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society' research: Final meeting report

By IT for Change Asia-Pacific

The final meeting of the ‘Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society’(CITIGEN) research network was organized by IT for Change in Bangalore in February 2012. The CITIGEN research programme studies whether marginalised women benefit from new information and communication technologies and whether the internet and mobile phones strengthened their active citizenship. The final meeting of the CITIGEN programme was an occasion for the network members and partners to take stock of the work done and to reflect upon the questions framing the research endeavour.

Critically absent: Women in internet governance. A policy advocacy toolkit

By Toolkit coordinator: Dafne Sabanes Plou Global

The women's movement has always had the ability to make the invisible visible and grant it a political character. This toolkit encourages women and their organisations to engage in political discussions regarding internet development with a vision of inclusion, fairness and respect for women's rights. The authors' vision is that the toolkit be used to raise awareness and encourage participation in a new environment where women cannot and should not be absent.

EROTICS: Sex, rights and the internet - an exploratory research study

By Jac sm Kee et al Global

How is the internet a key public sphere for the struggle for sexual citizenship and the exercise of sexual rights? What is its value to a diversity of users, especially those most marginalised or discriminated against because of their sexual, gender or other forms of social identity? Why do arguments for the regulation of the internet anchor on the moral imperative to regulate sexuality? Who are the key actors influencing processes of decision making, and what are the ways in which the potentially liberatory impact of the internet is being constricted and narrowed? The 3 year EROTICS research project delves into the complex world of sexuality and internet regulation, and uncovers interesting insights to these questions from Brazil, India, Lebanon, South Africa and the US. The full research findings and a synthesis chapter is presented in this report.