Asia-Pacific

Pakistan country report: Technology driven violence against women

Technology based violence is exposing women to the entire spectrum of conceivable harms in Pakistan. Victims of technology based violence have suffered physical violence ranging from rape to attempted assassination, psycho-social harms and loss of development opportunities. This was revealed in a research report launched by Bytes for All, Pakistan in Islamabad.

The report titled “Technology Driven Violence against Women” consolidates findings from three case studies featuring women who have survived violence and abuse originating from misuse of technology.

IGF 2014: Gender Dynamic Coalition taking place on Tuesday 2 September

The Gender Dynamic Coalition meeting will discuss outcomes from key processes and discussions on Internet governance leading up to IGF 2014 – including 2013 IGF Gender Report Card findings, WSIS+10 results, and NetMundial to assess integration of gender issues and concerns. The meeting also launches the new “Feminist Principles of the Internet,” which is a working document produced from a meeting of over 50 women’s and Internet rights activists in April 2014. Panelists and attendees will together develop thinking and analysis around the contentious issues of gender, sexuality, and the Internet, including online violence against women, ‘harmful’ content, ‘hate speech’, and sexual expression.

The Gender Dynamic Coalition meeting will discuss outcomes from key processes and discussions on internet governance leading up to IGF 2014 – including 2013 IGF Gender Report Card findings, WSIS+10 results, and NetMundial to assess integration of gender issues and concerns. The meeting also launches the new Feminist Principles of the Internet, which is a working document produced from a meeting of over 50 women’s and Internet rights activists in April 2014.

“A Facebook status can get you arrested faster than killing someone now”

In India, the largest democracy on Earth, 21-year old girl Shaheen Dhada was arrested for posting a status update on Facebook questioning the complete shutdown of cities for Bal Thackeray’s (rightwing leader notorious for inciting religious hatred and violence) funeral on Sunday, 18th November. Her friend Renu Srinivas was also arrested for “liking” the update which reportedly read: "People like Thackeray are born and die daily and one should not observe a 'bandh' [shutdown] for that." 

(the title is borrowed from @mohitgandhi69 tweet)

In India, the largest democracy on Earth, 21-year old girl Shaheen Dhada was arrested for posting a status update on Facebook questioning the complete shutdown of cities for Bal Thackeray’s (rightwing leader notorious for inciting religious hatred and violence) funeral on Sunday, 18th November.

Interview with Arzu Geybullayeva on the internet rights of women in Azerbaijan

Nighat Dad from "Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan":http://www.digitalrightsfoundation.pk speaks to Arzu Geybullayeva, a regional analyst and a blogger from Azerbaijan. Arzu's areas of interest are regional politics, conflict resolution, and new social media. In their "feminist talk” Nighat asks Arzu about her impressions of the 7th Internet Governance Forum, that took place in Baku, and key internet rights issues faced by women in Azerbaijan.
Nighat Dad from Digital Rights Foundation, Pakista speaks to Arzu Geybullayeva, a regional analyst and a blogger from Azerbaijan. Arzu's areas of interest are regional politics, conflict resolution, and new social media. In their feminist talk Nighat asks Arzu about her impressions of the 7th Internet Governance Forum, that took place in Baku, and key internet rights issues faced by women in Azerbaijan.

Azerbaijan: When online security is synonymous with personal safety

The Seventh Internet Governance Forum will be taking place in Baku, Azerbaijan from 6 to 9 November 2012. GenderIT.org writer Zooey Schock spoke with veteran activist Dr Leyla Yunus about internet freedom and the ability to organise in post-Soviet Asia.

Zooey Schock (ZS): Tell me what you do and how long you’ve been doing it?

Dr. Leyla Yunus (LY): I am a doctor of history from Azerbaijan.

Philippines: the problematic cybercrime prevention law of 2012

The recent passage of the Philippine Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 (or the Republic Act 10175) has elicited strong negative reactions from various stakeholders. Civil society organizations (CSOs), academe, journalists, bloggers, and Filipino netizens have expressed great concern over certain provisions of the law that impinged their constitutional right to freedom of expression.

Emerging forms of violence against women in the Philippines

These materials were produced by the Foundation for Media Alternatives from the Philippines as part of APC's MDG3: Take Back the Tech! to end violence against womenTake Back the Tech!">i project.

Attached below you can find useful materials for awareness raising and training on the subject of violence against women perpetrated through information and communication technologies, also called eVAW.

Here you will find information such as:

What is VAW – violence against women?

What is ICT – information and communication technologies?

The 'Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society' research: Final meeting report

The final meeting of the ‘Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society’(CITIGEN) research network was organized by IT for Change in Bangalore in February 2012. The CITIGEN research programme studies whether marginalised women benefit from new information and communication technologies and whether the internet and mobile phones strengthened their active citizenship. The final meeting of the CITIGEN programme was an occasion for the network members to take stock of the work done and to reflect upon the questions framing the research endeavour that they have been a part of.

Finding the balance: Women's rights and the internet in the Philippines

From 21 May to 4 June, the second cycle of the Human Rights Council's Universal Periodic Review (UPR) will begin. One of the 14 countries being reviewed is the Philippines. The UPR is a unique mechanism for states and governments to tell other countries what they have achieved in promoting human rights – but also for non-state actors to raise issues of concern in a non-confrontational fashion.

Submission to the UPR: Women’s access to justice in the Philippines

The submission to the UPR process elaborated by the Women´s Legal and Human Rightsi Bureau, Inc from the Philippines addresses the issue of women’s access to justice in the country, which highlights technology-related violence against womenStyle Information: N/a Source: www.takebackthetech.net/whatstheissue ">i (VAW) as an emerging form of VAW. The submission also looks at the gaps and challenges in available domestic remedies to survivors of violence and abuse against women online, criticizing that existing laws on VAW do not guarantee the prosecution of technology-related VAW.

Mapping the intersection of technology and gender-based violence

To see country or technology platform specific data download the fulltext version of this article under 'Attachment' below.

Who's gonna track me?

Information and communication technologies such as the internet and cell phones have proved to be strategic tools to assist women's human rights defenders (WHRD) on their advocacy by allowing them to meet, protest and interact freely, without the interference of the state or others. But at the same time ICT can represent an open door for many kinds of violations to the integrity of women’s human rights advocates if security measures are not adopted. Awareness is a key first step in preventing attacks and ensuring safety.

ICT to mobilize, to protest, to meet

Connectedness or alienation?

I started my first real paid job at the age of 21 at a feminist organisation in New Delhi. It was a year later, in 1997 that I first experienced email, via a shared office account. We only got that account because a guy called Leo (sitting somewhere else in the city – I don't quite know where) had a shell account that he shared with a few other NGOs. The next year I got my very first Yahoo email account. And then everything suddenly became incredibly different.

“Defending yourself means defending your community”

Running Toddler and Jennifer Radloff interview c5 and Anonymous – part 2.

The changing face of women's rights activism: be careful what you say online

Running Toddler and Jennifer Radloff interview c5 and Anonymous – part 1.

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