Blogs

[COLUMN] SANITARY PANELS ON WOMEN IN STEM

Sanitary Panels does a web comic series on gender and technology including discrimination faced by women in STEM education and careers. Here are two comics on circles of complicity around sexual harassment and STEM careers for women.

Sanitary Panels does a web comic series on gender and technology including discrimination faced by women in STEM education and careers. Here are two comics on circles of complicity around sexual harassment and STEM careers for women.

Image description: One panel

Panel: Concentric circles.
Text in inner most circle: Sexual harassers and abusers.

Flesh rather than word

In 2017 the Independent Expert for Sexual Orientation and Gender Expression and the Yogyakarta +10 principles acknowledged the specific social, cultural, health and other issues that are faced by those who are gender non conforming, and non-binary. This article looks at the online lives of those who challenge, play with, question and disrupt the gender binary, and do more - who are visibly and obviously queer.

Image source: Second Life avatar of Nadika Nadja
THE QUEER SUBJECT AND VIOLENCE IN ONLINE AND OFFLINE SPACES

Women's Gaze: Interview with Ninka Khaindrava

In this interview with Ninka Khaindrava, she talks about the state of activism around women's rights, labour rights and sexuality in Georgia. Ninka attended the MFI meeting in Malaysia to learn more about activists and their experiences with security and online violence in other parts of the world.

Image source: Ninka Khaindrava. First women march against online violence and attacks against women in Georgia

Ninka Khaindrava works for Women's Gaze in Georgia as their communications person. Women's Gaze is also part of the FRIDA network for young women. Here is our interview with her on the work they do and the connections they seek with other people, organisations, women's movements across the world.

Namita Aavriti: Can you tell us about your context and the kind of work you do?

Impact for what and for whom? Digital technologies and feminist movement building

Lulú Barrera(Luchadoras, Mexico) recorded a video of Srilata Batliwala (CREA, India) talking about movements, feminism, and disruption at the Making a Feminist Internet meeting in Malaysia in early October. This video and the short piece are to be read together as a dialogue between Srilatha Batliwala and “Primavera Violeta”.

How does technology impact in our feminist movements? from APC on Vimeo.

[COLUMN] Sanitary Panels on Mansplaining

Sanitary Panels is ironic yet hard hitting, where social commentary masquerades as a web comic and makes us rethink many of our assumptions. Here the comic explores aspects of gender and technology including discrimination faced by women in STEM education and careers.

Sanitary Panels is ironic yet hard hitting. Here social commentary masquerades as a web comic and makes us rethink many of our assumptions. This comic explores aspects of gender and technology including discrimination faced by women in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) education and careers.

Image description: Comic using stick figures

Automation and the future of work: bringing women into the debate

The future of work in a digital economy could vary enormously depending for different people depending on where they live, who they work for or in what industry, and what access to privilege and resources they have. Dr. Becky Faith in this article examines the particular impact that automation and AI might have on gendered, precarious and often poorly paid labour that women usually are engaged in across the world, but especially in developing countries.

Article republished from Institute of Development Studies.
Insights from the AI Summit, London

Talking digital security and language with Chido Musodza

In this third article on the city conversation on feminist principles of the internet in Harare, Zimbabwe, Daphne Jena interviews Chido Musodza on their work around digital security, the need for security for the women’s movement and feminists, and also broadly their take on the feminist principles of the internet.

Picture of Chido Musodza doing a training. Image source: Daphne Jena, Chido Musodza

[COLUMN] How womxn in the global south are RECLAIMING SOCIAL MEDIA to shine the spotlight on disability

Womxn in global south are making revolutionary uses of social media, and this includes people challenging casual and everyday ableism. In her column Samukelisiwe Mabaso looks at three amazing projects from different countries that are revolutionizing how disability is talked about - how they are changing language, discourse and perceptions

Genna & Felix by Kate Arthur. Image source: @katearthurartist

A university friend of mine was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) a few years ago and as a result of the disease is now disabled. Reading the posts she shares on social media about how she navigates the world as a disabled person has made me more aware of how disabled-unfriendly our world is. Whether intentionally or not, her posts on social media are helping shine a spotlight on disability. This inspired me to do some research into how other womxn in the Global South are doing the same.

Politics of a feminist internet in Zimbabwe: Resistance and Silence

In this article Anthea Taderera looks at the personal and political meaning and potentials of a feminist internet. What does it mean to imagine and create a black, African feminist space with room for archiving, theorising and engagement away/free from the surveillance and regulation of state and private parties alike?

Image from Max Pixel and Wikimedia commons

For the Harare City Conversation recently held, I was particularly invested in having a conversation about the internet, and Twitter in particular, as public space for organising and resisting, cognitive of the trajectory my online critiquing, writing and general feministing has taken over the last three years.

[COLUMN] How womxn in the Global South are RECLAIMING SOCIAL MEDIA to celebrate being queer

In her third column, Samukelisiwe Mabaso explores how groups and people, artists and performers who are lesbian, gay, bisexual are using the internet and social media to spread messages about love, diversity, and acceptance. This includes projects like Coalition for African Lesbians, Gaysi, Ahwaa and others.

Image source: To Revolutionary Type Love. Artist/source: Kawira Mwirichia

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