florencia's blog

Imagine a feminist internet: Participation and political movements

What does a feminist approach to the internet mean? What difference does approaching the internet as a feminist make? How is our political activity changed by cyber activism? While meditating on political participation at the hashtag #imagineafeministinternet, Florencia Goldsman shares some thoughts about these constructs in progress.

This is a space for reflection, for putting ideas into action and questioning every step of our way on the internet. In order to build and strengthen an intersecting movement of feminists and internet rights activists, activists from women’s groups, LGBTI groups and feminist media activists critically addressed women’s current techno-political experience. The question, How can we debate a field as diverse in its knowledge and struggles as feminism?

“An internet without violence against women will only be possible in a world without violence against women”

Ana Freitas, a Brazilian journalist and social network user, was threatened with rape and stalked close to her home after she published an article about sexism on chat sites and forums. In her article, Freitas – an expert on digital culture and behaviour, who has worked for the foremost media outlets in Brazil – did not mention specific persons or places; she only described the levels of machismo (male chauvinism) and misogyny experienced in some internet environments. In this interview with Florencia Goldsman for GenderIT.org, Freitas reflects on what happened, and declines to self-censor after the attacks. “My plans for 2015 are to continue writing about what interests me, to go out for runs and to enjoy Sao Paulo, my city,” she said.

Ana Freitas, a Brazilian journalist and social network user, was threatened with rape and stalked close to her home after she published an article about sexism on chat sites and forums. In her article, Freitas – an expert on digital culture and behaviour, who has worked for the foremost media outlets in Brazil – did not mention specific persons or places; she only described the levels of machismo (male chauvinism) and misogyny experienced in some internet environments.

Facebook: The king laid bare and the drag queens

The social network created by Mark Zuckerberg recently suspended the profiles of drag queens whose pages were under their stage names. The performers suddenly found themselves blocked from their accounts and were sent messages with instructions on how to replace their stage names with their legal names, according to Facebook’s “real name” policy.

The social network created by Mark Zuckerberg recently suspended the profiles of drag queens whose pages were under their stage names. The performers suddenly found themselves blocked from their accounts and were sent messages with instructions on how to replace their stage names with their legal names, according to Facebook’s “real name” policy.

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