gender

The nerdiest and most open of them all: Internet Freedom Festival 2017

Smita on 7 Apr 2017
The Internet Freedom Festival is refreshingly different from most forums around internet rights and technology - it is almost equal in gender ratio, welcoming of gender non conforming and trans persons, and takes privacy of its participants at the venue seriously. Smita Vanniyar tells us more about their experience at the festival this year in Valencia, Spain.

[BOOK REVIEW] Interpreting the Internet: Feminist and Queer counterpublics in Latin America

Alan Finlay on 5 Apr 2017
'Interpreting the internet: Feminist and Queer Counterpublics in Latin America by Elisabeth Jay Friedman looks at a decade long engagement of feminist and women's movements with technology. Alan Finlay reviews the book for GenderIT.org, and finds it to be essential reading for anyone interested in how feminist (or any) counterpublics are formed and shaped by appropriating whatever technology is available.

Giving my spirit voice: Interview with Helen Nyinakiiza

Namita on 17 Mar 2017
An interview with Helen Nyinakiiza, who has recently joined Association for Progressive Communication as an individual member. Helen is a passionate digital security trainer, and in this interview she talks about the use of technology and internet rights in Uganda, the digital divide around gender and region, and how she does her trainings.

[COLUMN] Gender Binary: Second Life, First Loves

Nadika on 30 Jan 2017
In this column, Nadika Nadja explores the world of gaming and how it opened up realms of experience for her. Second Life, an enormous immersive multiplayer game, and many other similar environments on the internet, have been revelatory and powerful spaces for people to discover aspects of themselves, particularly in terms of gender and sexuality. From shame and fear, to play and sex, and to finding comfort zones and support online, Nadika sketches out her journey for us.

Beyond the offline-online binary – why women need a new global social contract

Anita Gurumurthy on 13 Dec 2016
The non-territorial, transborder Internet has added layers of complexity to the human rights debate. The idea of substantive equality – a compass for human rights and the key to gender justice – must be interpreted anew and afresh, as the force of digital technologies complicates the nature of social relations and institutions. The easy binary divisions of online and offline cease to make sense in an increasingly digitised world.

Algorithmic discrimination and the feminist politics of being in the data

Dr. Nicole Shephard on 5 Dec 2016
Global data volume has grown exponentially in recent years and experts expect this trend to continue. The wider trend towards the pervasive datafication of our lives is not one we can just sit out. Big data and the algorithmic decisions it feeds permeate citizenship, healthcare, welfare states, education, finance, law enforcement as well as the ways in which we shop, travel, and live our social lives. They can take on a benign air of innovation and efficiency but also carry an intrinsic baggage of surveillance and control.

Digital Storytelling: All our stories are true and they are ours!

Jennifer Radloff on 13 Nov 2016
It is a sacred act to tell and to listen to stories. Some of our stories are rooted so deep in our cells, psyches and hearts, that it takes an act of courage to find the words to tell them. We each contain a multitude of stories that shape and make us who we are. It can also be a political act to tell a story. We conceptualise digital story telling as a recording and documentation method which foregrounds the voice and experiences of story tellers as primary in the process of storytelling.

The (mobile) games women play

Neha Mathews on 21 Oct 2016
Games on mobile phones are often a disregarded area of study, because it is relatively cheap and less glamorous than video games. But global consumer spending on mobile gaming in 2015 was estimated to be worth 34.8 billion dollars, and there have been several reports talking about how India is on the ‘verge of a mobile gaming boom’. What the numbers often fail to mention is that a large chunk of people playing mobile games are women.

Coming Back to Tech

Carol on 2 Oct 2016
There are a growing number of resources to prevent and respond to many kinds of online harassment faced by women and marginalised people working as activists, human rights defenders or journalists. But what happens 'the day after' an attack? What happens after the more urgent crisis phase(s) of a campaign of harassment passes?

[COLUMN] The Gender Binary: Thank you!

Nadika on 22 Sep 2016
The word Impostor keeps coming up every time a trans woman writes about herself. It is there, just below the surface, despite all the estrogen and progesterone, under all the skin-colour foundation and pink lipstick and shiny earrings. It is behind the pads on our breast, cushioning the tender nipples. The feeling, and the word - impostor. We are impostors when we try to be us, and when we try to be what you think we are.

5 reasons why surveillance is a feminist issue

Dr. Nicole Shephard on 15 Aug 2016
Contemporary surveillance practices are to a large extent big data driven, underpinned by a collect-it-all logic, and ever expanding due to fear-mongering, yet pervasive national security discourse. Surveillance technologies and practices have not only multiplied in scale and quantity. Too often, feminist issues on the one hand, and discussions around privacy and surveillance on the other still feel like separate domains. What follows is an attempt at emphasising that thinking them together makes a lot of sense.

Thinking about gender and technology

Nyx McLean on 20 Apr 2012
In South Africa a video recently went viral in which a young woman is gang-raped. This video has re-ignited discussions around gender-based violence within the country, many of these discussions have taken place on social media platforms such as Twitter.

Gender in the online news: The 2010 GMMP

Sonia Randhawa on 6 Oct 2010
Since the 1995 conference in Beijing, the Global Media Monitoring Project has provided a snapshot of gender imbalances in the world's media, once every five years. This year, they expanded the coverage from the 'traditional' media to take a look at the internet. Unfortunately, their findings were not encouraging.
Syndicate content