sexual rights

A place for all: On being diverse and inclusive @RightsCon

Serene Lim on 28 Apr 2017
More than 1,500 business leaders, civil society advocates, policy makers, lawyers, bloggers, technologists, and users participated in RightsCon Brussels 2017 (March) and there were over 250 sessions related to human rights and technology. Serene Lim explores the ways in which inequity was addressed at the forum, and how exclusion and marginalisation were framed in various sessions.

The nerdiest and most open of them all: Internet Freedom Festival 2017

Smita on 7 Apr 2017
The Internet Freedom Festival is refreshingly different from most forums around internet rights and technology - it is almost equal in gender ratio, welcoming of gender non conforming and trans persons, and takes privacy of its participants at the venue seriously. Smita Vanniyar tells us more about their experience at the festival this year in Valencia, Spain.

What is sexual surveillance and why does it matter

Dr. Nicole Shephard on 6 Mar 2017
We can no longer ignore the pervasive datafication of our lives - the ways in which our habits, illness, abilities, relations are abstracted, and our bodies made into data by an intersecting range of institutions and processes. In this article, the gendered, sexualised and racialised nature of surveillance is unpacked, so we maintain a focus on the power relations involved. Surveillance affects racialised groups, the gender non-conforming, people with disabilities, and other marginalised populations disproportionately.

‘There’s someone else just like you’: inside India’s asexuality networks

Shreya Ila Anasuya on 3 Feb 2017
Asexuality is often dismissed as experience or identity, even by those within the medical community. However in recent times the internet has played a valuable role in both affirming the choices of those who identify as asexual, and in building networks of support and conversation. Given that it is still very difficult to speak openly about any sexuality in most physical spaces in India, the internet is the only place where digitally-connected asexual people or aces can safely (and anonymously) speak about their experiences.

Defining their place: Gender at the Internet Governance Forum 2016

Smita on 18 Jan 2017
The Internet Governance Forum has been valuable as a multistakeholder space that facilitates the discussion and dialogue of public policy issues pertaining to the Internet. Over the years several feminists, activists and others interested in diverse representation have been participating in IGF and observing how concerns related to gender, sexuality, and the internet are raised and addressed. Smita Vanniyar writes a short report on IGF 2016 in Guadalajara, Mexico, and how gender and sexuality are still largely a concern for the women activists and queer people present, rather than for all.

ESC rights, gender and internet: Learnings from the GISWatch report

Namita on 7 Dec 2016
The GISWatch report 2016 looks at the link between economic, social, cultural (ESC) rights and the internet in several countries, and from a multitude of systems of governance, whether that of socialism and the welfare state, or the semi-functional welfare schemes in parts of Asia and Africa (Uganda, Cambodia), and even the relatively privileged parts of the world, like Spain. Here is a synthesis of the reports that deal with gender, sexual orientation, sexuality and women human rights defenders.

I delete myself: anonymity and sexuality online

Smita on 23 Aug 2016
The fact that the Internet allows women to be anonymous has greatly aided in increased freedom of expression as well as in combating sexual discrimination, violence as well as domestic abuse. Even with the points in favour of right to anonymity being far and wide, it is not seen as a priority in many countries. Human rights activists and the civil society are only beginning to acknowledge that the lack of anonymity directly infringes on freedom of speech and expression.

5 reasons why surveillance is a feminist issue

Dr. Nicole Shephard on 15 Aug 2016
Contemporary surveillance practices are to a large extent big data driven, underpinned by a collect-it-all logic, and ever expanding due to fear-mongering, yet pervasive national security discourse. Surveillance technologies and practices have not only multiplied in scale and quantity. Too often, feminist issues on the one hand, and discussions around privacy and surveillance on the other still feel like separate domains. What follows is an attempt at emphasising that thinking them together makes a lot of sense.

FTX @ AWID Forum 2012

Jac sm Kee on 6 Apr 2012
What are the emerging risks and challenges that women's rights advocates face in using technology for activism? How can we strategise to work more safely and securely online? What is the feminist politics of privacy, security and the right to participate on the internet? Join us at the Feminist Tech Exchange on 18 April 2012, just before the 12th AWID International Forum, to explore and exchange ideas and strategies on the feminist politics and practices of online security, privacy and women's rights!
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