brazil

Sexuality and the internet: a five country perspective

Richa Kaul Padte on 1 Apr 2013
This blog post is the final one in a series of ten blog posts to report on the EROTICS India workshop, recently concluded in Delhi. All the blog posts in this series are written by Richa Kaul Padte, the official rapporteur at the meeting.

Brazil, Magaly Pazello: “We have no specific debate on women's internet rights”

Flavia Fascendini on 5 Apr 2012
Magaly Pazello, activist and specialist researcher in gender and information and communication technologies, recently joined the team that developed the Brazil report for the UN's Universal Periodic Review. In discussion with Flavia Fascendini, the editor of GenderIT.org, Pazello confirmed that there is still a great deal to do with regards to the connection between women's rights and a broad understanding of the internet.

Submission to the Universal Periodic Review of Brazil

APC on 3 Apr 2012
This joint submission has been prepared by the APC Women’s Networking Support Programme in consultation with Instituto Nupef and is endorsed by Sexuality Policy Watch. The submission focuses on human rights and the internet in Brazil. It highlights areas where Brazil is doing well, specific areas of concern, and makes five recommendations for follow-up and implementation. The submission focuses on the women’s human rights to sexual and reproductive health information and citizens’ rights to free expression and privacy.

MEDIA BRIEF: Censorship, sexuality and the internet

APC on 9 Aug 2011
What is sexual content on the internet? What are sexuality and sexual rights? Which communications rights are critical for people's sexual rights? What are the most common threats to people's sexual rights? What are some of the methods and impacts of censorship of "sexual content" on the internet? These and other issues are highlighted by the media brief published by APC as part of the EroTICs research.

EROTICS: Sex, rights and the internet - an exploratory research study

Jac sm Kee on 9 Aug 2011
How is the internet a key public sphere for the struggle for sexual citizenship and the exercise of sexual rights? What is its value to a diversity of users, especially those most marginalised or discriminated against because of their sexual, gender or other forms of social identity? Why do arguments for the regulation of the internet anchor on the moral imperative to regulate sexuality? Who are the key actors influencing processes of decision making, and what are the ways in which the potentially liberatory impact of the internet is being constricted and narrowed? The 3 year EROTICS research project delves into the complex world of sexuality and internet regulation, and uncovers interesting insights to these questions from Brazil, India, Lebanon, South Africa and the US. The full research findings and a synthesis chapter is presented in this report.

Brazil: An ethnographic approach – mapping sexuality on Orkut

Flavia Fascendini on 29 Jul 2011
Flavia Fascendini explores two communities on the Orkut social networking site on sexuality: one is a forum for anti-lesbian prejudice, and the second is a community aimed at legitimising romantic relationships between adults and adolescents. Both groups were studied as the part of the Brazilian EROTICS research project that focused on mapping the dynamic and complex policy shifts on internet regulation debates in Brazil.

EROTICS in Brazil: The complex universe of sexuality on the internet

Flavia Fascendini on 28 Jun 2011
Sexuality Policy Watch and the Latin American Centre on Sexuality and Human Rights teamed up together to conduct the EroTICs research in Brazil. In an interview with Flavia Fascendini, they talked about their participation in the project as an opportunity to address the nuanced impact of new Internet legislation on sexuality. They approached this complex issue from two sides: looking at legislative and public policy on the one hand, and at expressions of sexual minorities on the other. Their next step will be to discuss the findings with other researchers and actors in the fields of communications, gender and sexual rights.

Internet regulations can benefit from cross-sectoral conversations, says Marina Maria at the Human Rights Council

Kateřina Fialová on 8 Jun 2011
Marina Maria, a member of the Brazil EroTICs research team, was one of the panellists of the 'Internet rights are human rights' event co-organized by the APC with the Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs at the Human Rights Council’s 17th session in Geneva on June 3. Due to time limitations, she was not able to present her paper in full at the event. GenderIT.org is publishing her complete presentation in which she provides interesting insights in recent policy debates on internet regulation in Brazil and how human right framework's was brought back to the debate thanks to the intervention of local activists.

EROTICS: Exploratory research on sexuality and the internet - summary report

Jac sm Kee on 16 Feb 2011
What is the value of the internet in the exercise of sexual rights? From 2008 to 2010, the EROTICS research sought to answer this question, aiming to bridge the gap between policy and legislative measures that regulate content and practice on the internet, and the actual lived practices, experiences and concerns of internet users in the exercise of their sexual rights. The summary report provides an overview of the research, and surfaces the key areas of concern, interest and findings of five national studies in Brazil, India, Lebanon, South Africa and the United States. They give a compelling glimpse into the richness of the research universe, and the complexity of the subject.

Internet regulation and the Brazilian EroTICs context

Marina Maria on 2 Jun 2010
Authors Sonia Corrêa, Marina Maria and Jandira Queiroz document how gender and sexuality have been at the heart of internet regulation debates in Brazil. However, this centrality does not necessarily translate to the discourses, analysis and the political claims of social actors involved in sexual politics, on the one hand, and digital politics, on the other. In the authors' view, there is no clarity or positioning among feminists and LGBT activists regarding the ways in which gender and sexuality issues are at play in the political dynamics of internet regulation. Further no strong interaction exists between communication rights advocates and the world of sexual politics. Nevertheless the authors perceive cyber activists' commitment to privacy rights as very auspicious for sexual and reproductive rights.

Mexico, Argentina, Brazil and Colombia: Cross-country Study on Violence against Women and Information Communication Technologies

Kateřina Fialová on 2 Jun 2010
María Isabel and María Alejandra Davidziuk compare the findings of four national reports from Mexico, Brazil, Argentina and Colombia undertaken as part of the APC WNSP project “Strengthening women’s strategic use of ICTs to combat violence against women and girls”. In their analysis they look at some barriers (both institutional and cultural) that need to be overcome in order for ICTs to be successfully used to decrease violence against women and girls.

Brazil: Violence against Women and Information Communication Technologies

on 2 Jun 2010
In this paper, Ingrid Leao, Thais Lapa and Tamara Amoroso discuss violence against women in the media, with advertisement and TV show examples. It also looks at civil society expectations for the first National Conference on Communications, to be held in December 2009. It examines the use of social networks like Orkut and Twitter; denouncements of VAW practices, such as cyber-bullying of teenage girls; and how ICTs are also used for prevention and assistance of VAW survivors.Read the abstract of the paper below. Full paper is available in Spanish.
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