csw

It is not yet time; we must reclaim our space

JulietWere on 29 May 2015
It is exciting to be a part of this edition, and especially that it is 20 years since the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action – a blueprint that brought energy and enthusiasm to the women’s movement. It enhanced the liveliness of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, and reaffirmed that “Women’s Rights are Human Rights”. Today, in a number of dialogues with communities, sentiments like “these are the Beijing women” pop out, an indication that our message has taken root and that it is causing discomfort to the patriarchal systems and structures. Violence against women is rooted in patriarchy and thus any progress observed in the feminist discourse in the past 20 years has been an effort in dealing with societal attitudes, practices and behaviours. And for attitudes and behaviours to shift, Section J on “Women and the Media” has played a central role. A key element in this success is the creativity and innovativeness that women have brought on board using information and communications technologies (ICTs).

Imagining a feminist internet 20 years after the launch of Section J

GICT Admin on 29 May 2015
Is it still possible to imagine a debate on a feminist internet within the context of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW)? This question has been resounding since the last session of the CSW took place in March 2015. We hope you find this GenderIT.org edition useful, with its analysis of what happened around Section J at the 59th session of the CSW, as well as what did not happen, and ideas on how to strategise around this space in the future.

Time to update the Section J on women’s real needs

Bianca Baldo on 29 May 2015
Twenty years after the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the specific elaboration of Section J on women and the media, the review resolution does not reflect the impact that ICTs have proven to have on women’s lives, as a means to dramatically advance or hinder women’s rights. In this interview by Bianca Baldo for GenderIT.org, APC’s Jennifer Radloff and Sara Baker agree that we should move away from participating in panels for side-events at the Commission on the Status of Women, and focus instead on working with governments to co-organise high-level panels on issues relating to Section J, as well as working with other women's rights organisations that are interested in the feminist principles of the internet and together strategise on how to influence agendas. They also agree on a crucial issue that is overlooked by governments: Section J is about women's voices.

Joanne Sandler: “Links between Section J and patriarchy need to be high on the agenda of feminists worldwide”

Lamia Kosovic on 29 May 2015
This year’s Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) outcomes set off some alarm bells of concern about the lack of political space for civil society in the CSW process. While the Commission adopted a Political Declaration that reaffirms states’ commitment to the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, it failed to confront the real challenges that women and girls around the world face at this very moment. In light of these recent developments, Lamia Kosovic conducted an interview for GenderIT.org with Joanne Sandler, a Senior Associate of Gender at Work and former Deputy Executive Director of UNIFEM, to hear her personal opinion on the issue at stake.

Infographic: Mapping technology-based violence against women - Take Back the Tech! top 8 findings

APC on 6 Mar 2015
Did you know that women between 18-30 years old (and younger) are the ones most vulnerable online? And did you know that the majority (40%) of cases are perpetrated by someone known to the survivor? Check out this infographic that draws on the 1126 cases reported on the Take Back the Tech! online map from 2012 to 2014.

From impunity to justice: Domestic legal remedies for cases of technology-related violence against women

on 6 Mar 2015
The present research seeks to examine the availability and effectiveness of existing domestic legal remedies for survivors of technology-related VAW to access justice and to prevent such violence from occurring. This research was carried out between April 2013 and June 2014 by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) as part of a multi-country project entitled “Ending violence: Women’s rights and safety online”.

Infographic: 4 reasons women struggle to access justice in tech-based VAW

APC on 6 Mar 2015
Did you know that less than half of reported cases of technology-based violence against women (VAW) are investigated by the authorities? Check this infographic to know more about our "From impunity to justice: Exploring corporate and legal remedies for technology-related violence against women" research findings.

CSW59: Reprioritising Section J of the Beijing Platform for Action

Flavia Fascendini on 6 Mar 2015
From 9 to 20 March 2015, women's rights advocates and organisations have gathered along with member states at the United Nations Headquarters in New York for the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW59), to review progress made in the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action in achieving gender equality and the empowerment of women.

Join APC's campaign and events at the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women in New York

Flavia Fascendini on 6 Mar 2015
Between 9 and 20 March, APC's Women's Rights Programme members will be attending the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women in New York. This year the main focus of the session will be on the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which turns 20. How far have we come, and how can you participate?

From impunity to justice: Exploring corporate and legal remedies for technology-related violence against women

APC on 2 Mar 2015
A new series of reports by the Association for Progressive Communications presents findings from a multi-country research project on technology-related violence against women (VAW). The research – which reveals a lack of access to justice for survivors – highlights the voices and experiences of women who have faced technology-related VAW and sought justice through state agencies and internet intermediaries.

Two weeks to push for greater recognition of our rights

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 7 Apr 2014
What did we do for two weeks in New York? We participated in one of the most interesting and combative meetings for the advancement of women's rights worldwide. The annual session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) is a major event on the calendar of governments and women's organisations because it is where discussions take place on advances and unmet goals under the Beijing Platform for Action and other agreements reached at the Fourth World Conference on Women in 1995. Almost 20 years after the signing of this Platform by all of the world's governments, the monitoring of fulfillment and the need to continue reaffirming and advancing the achievement of women's rights continues to draw concerted attention and heated discussion from government and civil society representatives. These debates are crucial to ensure that the agreements reached in Beijing do not merely remain on paper or as good intentions frozen in time.

Back and forth in the advancement of women's rights at CSW58

Flavia Fascendini on 7 Apr 2014
The theme of the 58th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW58), which took place in New York on 10-21 March 2014, was “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals for women and girls”. Also on the meeting agenda was Women’s and girls’ access to technology. This GenderIT.org edition addresses the negotiations and barganing in agreements during CSW 58 around information and communication technologies (ICTs) and women’s rights, as well as the prospects for 2015, a key year for the women’s movement agenda. Debates around women’s reproductive health and rights issues were a clear example of this. Once again advocates need to spend their efforts in defending previous agreements instead of building on them for visible progression.

CSW58: "We need to move beyond agreements towards public policies that will fulfil the commitments made to women"

The 58th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) took place from 10 to 21 March 2014 at the United Nations headquarters in New York. “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and girls" was this year's priority theme. The participation of women's organisations in CSW sessions provides an opportunity for delegations to highlight and promote the incorporation of specific gender equity goals. After many years of work, women's organisations have achieved a voice of their own at these meetings. But participation is not enough. Holding governments accountable to the effective implementation of the commitmentsthey signed onto, is the new challenge. To analyse these and other questions, GenderIT.org writer Florencia Flores Iborra spoke with Dafne Sabanes Plou, who participated in CSW 58 and shared her views on the issues discussed during the session.

Good women, girls and HIV: Morality over health at the Commission on the Status of Women

Melissa Hope Ditmore on 3 Apr 2014
Every March, the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) meets at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City. This year’s theme was the Millennium Development Goals, because a new development framework is being worked out beyond 2015. In addition to the events about technology, this year’s Commission on the Status of Women negotiated a resolution on HIV. Negotiating the resolution on Women, the girl child and HIV/AIDS was difficult and went late into the night.
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