foss

TIC : Femmes, logiciels libres, copyrights, …les oubliés du législateur et du décideur mauritaniens

Les logiciels libres sont une vraie solution aux problèmes de fracture numérique qu’engendre le sous -développement. En effet, il est désormais indéniable qu’ils ont, avec l’implication des femmes et leur prise en compte comme actrices incontournables, une part importante à jouer dans la création d’un environnement favorable à un développement équitable et durable.

Les droits d’auteur et les brevets limitent–ils l’accès aux connaissances et au traitement du VIH/SIDA en Afrique?

Sylvie Nyombo on 2 Jun 2010
Le dernier rapport de 2008 de l’ONUSIDA confirme que l’Afrique subsaharienne reste la région du monde la plus sérieusement affectée par le VIH, et représente les deux tiers (671%) du total des personnes vivant avec le VIH et les trois quarts (75%) des décès dus au SIDA en 2007. Environ 1,9 million de personnes ont été nouvellement infectées par le VIH en Afrique subsaharienne.

ICTs: Women, free software, copyrights,… forgotten by Mauritanian legislators and decision-makers

Fatma Mint Elkory Oumrane takes a look at the progress Mauritania is making in encouraging open access to materials, its copyright regime and how these impact on women. She examines the role of women as ICT graduates and looks at how the government is helping overcome the various digital divides - and the large amount of work that remains to be done.

We assume FOSS benefits all equally. But does it really?

Cheekay Cinco on 2 Jun 2010
FOSS has the potential to change the way women relate with ICTs, allowing for more control over the tools they use. As Users, women will have the freedom from steep licensing fees and the opportunity to influence software development to meet their needs. As developers, the open principle behind FOSS encourages a more collaborative environment, in which women may discover more freedom to create applications and solutions. However until women are recognised as equal partners, users and developers in FOSS, these potentials will remain at rest.

African Copyright & Access to Knowledge Project

GenderIT.org on 2 Jun 2010
The African Copyright & Access to Knowledge (ACA2K) Project examines the relationship between national copyright environments and access to knowledge in African countries. The project is probing this relationship within an access to knowledge (A2K) framework - a framework which regards the protection/promotion of user access as one of the central objectives of copyright law. The project works in eight countries, Eygpt, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Mozambique, Senegal, South Africa and Uganda.

Free/Libre/Open Source Software Asian Developers Online Survey (FLOSS-ASIA)

GenderIT.org on 2 Jun 2010
The objective of the survey was to determine the situation regarding open source software/free software (OSS/FS) engineers in Japan by gathering information directly from open source/free software developers themselves. The results will be used in personnel training in relevant technical fields, in planning policy for technology promotion and other areas. <br />

Free/Libre and open source software: survey and study FLOSS

GenderIT.org on 2 Jun 2010
This document forms the final report for the FLOSS project. <br /> <p><br /> The Project objectives were remedy the lack of information on Free/Libre/Open Source Software starting at the very beginning: by conducting surveys to generate a unique base of primary data on Free/Open Source Software usage and development; identifying indicators to measure value creation and dissemination in the OS/FS arena; identifying business models based on these indicators; identifying the impact of and recommending changes in government policy and regulatory environments with regards to OS/FS; finally, the development of a base for extending these to the broader economic measurement of non-monetary and trans-monetary activity in the information society, beyond the domain of OS/FS. <br />

FLOSS-US. The Free/Libre/Open source software survey for 2003

GenderIT.org on 2 Jun 2010
This is the Final report of a second large-scale survey of 1588 developers of open source and free software, which was called the FLOSS-US survey for 2003. The first FLOSS survey targeted primarily European OS/FS developers, with 71% of respondents living in Europe or Russia, only 13% living in the United States, and roughly 17% living elsewhere in Europe or the world. The FLOSS-US survey sampled many more developers from countries outside of Europe, with 53% living in Western Europe, 27% living in North America, 8% in Russia and Eastern Europe, 5% in East Asia, 3% in Australia and New Zealand, 3% in Latin America, and 1% in the Middle East and Africa. <br />

A Techno-Feminist Perspective on the Free/Libre Open Source

Kateřina Fialová on 2 Jun 2010
This paper tries to analyse the FLOSS development from a <br /> "techno-feminist" perspective (Wajcman 2004). Staying away from a reductionism that simplifies the gender issue in the FLOSS community to the level of a fight between men and women, the issues I attempt to address include not only the inequality that women face in computing, but also other inequalities that other users face mainly emerging from <br /> the power relationships between expert and lay (namely, developer and user) in software design. Instead of splitting women and men in the FLOSS development, this analysis helps motivate both men and women to work together, reduce the gender gap, and improve the disadvantaged <br /> statuses of women and a wider users community in the FLOSS development.

Gender & FLOSS, Asia Source Tech Camp

Jac sm Kee on 2 Jun 2010
This statement on Gender and Free/Libre & Open Source Software (F/LOSS) was written by participants of a session on Gender & F/LOSS at the Asia Source Tech Camp, held in Bangalore on 28th January - 4th February, 2005. The Statement looks at gender in the context of the camp, with an aim to inform planning of similar F/LOSS workshops in the future.

EU survey on free and open source software

GenderIT.org on 2 Jun 2010
In 2002, MERIT/Infonomics at the University of Maastricht, the Netherlands, carried out the FLOSS developer survey supported by the European Union. This was the first survey that provided deep insights in the international FLOSS community, its divisions, its diversity of beliefs, and its functioning.

Inclusion, diversity and gender equality: Gender Dimensions of the Free/Libre Open Source Software Development

Kateřina Fialová on 2 Jun 2010
This essay describes and analyses challenges (societal<br /> and organisational) and advantages (e.g. new models for<br /> mobile and collaborative work online), particularly<br /> regarding gender issues, encountered in the recent FLOSS<br /> development. The paper concludes with suggestions on<br /> how to create rules and resources and the creation of a<br /> common FLOSS space for both genders.<br />

Report from the ICT Training for Bulgarian Women

GenderIT.org on 2 Jun 2010
The report is based on the experience from the ICT Training for Bulgarian Women from NGOs

E-commerce and Development Report 2003

Kateřina Fialová on 2 Jun 2010
The annual UNCTAD report analyses, from a development perspective, recent trends and advances in information and communication technologies (ICT), such as e-commerce and e-business, and examines their applications in developing countries.
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