internet intermediaries

[COLUMN] Access and beyond (1): Navigating the gendered cyberspace

Chenai Chair on 12 Apr 2017
In this column series, Chenai Chair explores the barriers to accessing the internet in four countries in Africa - Rwanda, Nigeria, South Africa and Kenya. The study in particular looks at the impact of affordability of internet and subsidised data services, and what impact this has on people in different locations (countries, urban-rural), of different genders, and so on. In the first column, Chenai examines what kind of methodology is suited for research on access.

[COLUMN] Joining the dots: Labour, sustainability, resilience in gender and climate change

Sonia Randhawa on 17 Oct 2016
What is the connection between labour unions, women workers and climate change? This monthly column on connecting the dots between climate change and gender, explores the exploitative conditions that are still prevalent in the electronics industry. While workers in Pearl River delta in China may no longer face sweatshop conditions, the production has shifted to other poorer parts and most often to women workers.

[COLUMN] Joining the dots: Gender, ICTs and climate change

Sonia Randhawa on 19 Sep 2016
We are facing a climate emergency. In this column series, GenderIT is joining millions of other groups and individuals in building hope in the face of this fear. First we examine why climate change and the contributions of the ICT industry to climate change have a gender dimension, and why gender and ICT policy needs to build in climate awareness. In other words, just like gender, climate change is a cross-cutting issue that should be taken into account in all policy initiatives.

From fear to courage: Talking about technology, violence and justice in Mexico

Florencia Goldsman on 23 Nov 2015
An interview by Florencia Goldsman with research report author Gabriela Polanco and APC’s project coordinator in Mexico Erika Smith explores many of the nuances that emerged from the research. From assessing to what extent technology is an enabler of violence to musing on the various meanings of ‘justice’ for survivors, this conversation takes us behind the scenes of the Mexican edition of the End violence: Women's rights and safety online project.

Research design: Exploring corporate and state remedies for technology-related violence against women

Kateřina Fialová on 9 Sep 2015
Between April 2013 and June 2014, the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) carried out a multi-country research entitled „From impunity to justice“ as the part of its project End violence: Women's rights and safety online. The research involved the collection of case studies that highlight the voices and experiences of women from the global south who have faced technology-related VAW. The research design document outlines theoretical framework, research methodology, and instruments used in the research.

From fake accounts to harassing phone calls: talking about technology-related violence against women in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Lamia Kosovic on 4 Sep 2015
Bosnia and Herzegovina was one of seven countries covered by APC's research project “End Violence: Women's rights and safety online”. The research in BIH was done in association with One World Platform for Southeast Europe (OWPSEE). The report uses three in-depth case studies to assess legal instruments, corporate policies, and women’s access to justice. Here, writer Lamia Kosovic speaks to two members of the OWPSEE research team, Valentina Pellizzer and Aida Mahmutović, taking us behind the scenes of the BIH research.

Bosnia and Herzegovina: Exploring technology-related violence against women

OneWorldSEE on 30 Aug 2015
This report emerges from research carried out in Bosnia and Herzegovina between July 2013 and April 2014 by One World Platform for South East Europe (OWPSEE) and the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) as part of a seven-country project entitled “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online”.

Facebook domestication

Emrys Schoemaker on 7 Aug 2015
From ISIS recruitments to the Arab Spring, the narrative around social media remains consistently simplistic: it’s a dynamic technology that creates change – both ‘good’ and ‘bad’. This is particularly true for claims about the technology’s potential to ‘liberate oppressed women’.

Looking for evidence of gender inequality in sexual harassment on Twitter

Katharina Jens on 16 Jul 2015
Twitter has been chosen for this study developed by Katharina Jens, a Media and Communication graduate from the London School of Economics and Political Science, because it has become a platform where abuse has become the most visible following the attacks of the women above. This thesis sets out to empirically provide evidence for the inequality produced online, by analysing a snap-shot of the sexual harassment a lot of women are experiencing daily on Twitter.

Talking about snowflakes on the iceberg

Kateřina Fialová on 19 Jun 2015
It is late spring of 2015 and we are sitting in one of the most beautiful cities in Europe, talking about a grave violation of women's human rights: violence against women (VAW). It has been a long time since I have been invited to speak about technology-based VAW to a group which is primarily working in the area of women's rights and VAW, but engages little if at all with internet rights. It is a mixture of politicians, police officers, government representatives, advocates, support organisations and academics.

Why I decided to study feminist activism on social media

Sujatha Subramanian on 15 Jun 2015
"As part of my research, I found it important to not just study and document such instances of misogynistic violence in online spaces but also instances of activism, of resistance, of solidarity," states Sujatha Subramanian in this great article that tracks back the path she walked to write "From the streets to the web: Looking at feminist activism on social media".

Technology-related VAW addressed by report of Special Rapporteur on violence against women

Flavia Fascendini on 15 Jun 2015
The report produced by the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences contains the findings following her visit to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from March to April 2014. The report flags technology-related violence as one of the ways in which VAW manifests, pointing specially to online harmful behaviours such as humiliation, harassment, intimidation and “sexting”.

Philippines: Exploring technology-related violence against women and children

GenderIT.org on 8 Jun 2015
We’re back! – with the second in a series of seven mini-editions highlighting APC’s project “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online”. Each edition focuses on one country where we carried out the research, and this time round, we’ll look at the Philippines. Bringing together articles, key findings and an interview with the research team, this edition looks at cases ranging from celebrity sex videos to child pornography, and draws attention to various socio-economic realities in the Philippines. Based on research carried out by communication rights organisation Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA), here we explore various facets of technology-related violence against women and children in the Philippines.

Of celebrity sex tapes and child porn: talking about technology-related violence in the Philippines

Syar S. Alia on 8 Jun 2015
The Philippines was one of seven countries covered by APC’s research project “End violence: Women's rights and safety online”. The research in the Philippines was done in association with the Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA). Here, Syar S. Alia speaks to FMA’s programme coordinator for gender and ICT, Lisa S. Garcia, to take a closer look at the research findings.

Pakistan: Exploring technology-related violence against women

GICT Admin on 29 May 2015
Welcome to the first in a series of seven mini-editions we’re putting together to highlight the project "End violence: Women’s rights and safety online". Each edition focuses on one country in which the research was conducted, and brings together articles, major findings, and interviews with the research teams. In this edition we look at Pakistan, where religious and cultural controls over women intersect with technology, language barriers prevent intermediaries from addressing abuse, and justice has a slippery meaning.
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