labour rights

Women's Gaze: Interview with Ninka Khaindrava

GenderIT.org on 7 Nov 2017
In this interview with Ninka Khaindrava, she talks about the state of activism around women's rights, labour rights and sexuality in Georgia. Ninka attended the MFI meeting in Malaysia to learn more about activists and their experiences with security and online violence in other parts of the world.

Automation and the future of work: bringing women into the debate

Dr. Becky Faith on 24 Oct 2017
The future of work in a digital economy could vary enormously depending for different people depending on where they live, who they work for or in what industry, and what access to privilege and resources they have. Dr. Becky Faith in this article examines the particular impact that automation and AI might have on gendered, precarious and often poorly paid labour that women usually are engaged in across the world, but especially in developing countries.

"We cannot be what we cannot see": Mapping gaps in research in gender and information society

GenderIT.org on 10 Sep 2017
The articles in this bilingual edition point to how visibility of our bodies and our stories is the starting point of a different way of being. The stories we tell of struggles and perseverance, of movements and solidarity – entangled as they are in the fine wires of technology – are necessary and essential and could be the foundations for the movement for change. This edition is not exhaustive of the gaps in the research of gender and information society, but we hope it is a starting point – a launch pad – into what has not yet been explored. Because we cannot be what we cannot see.

An ongoing conversation on feminist autonomous infrastructure: Erika Smith and Kéfir

erika on 2 Aug 2017
What began as a small fundraising drive in July 2017 for Kéfir, a feminist libre tech co-op, has transformed into exploring the importance of feminist infrastructure in Latin America. This is an ongoing conversation between Erika Smith, from Take Back the Tech and APC-WRP with members of the collective Kéfir on infrastructure and the internet, labour in movements, and how to set up new collectives that have to exist within and with economic, social and political hegemonies.

IGF Best practice forum on Gender and Access (2016): Overcoming barriers to enable women's meaningful internet access

on 13 Jun 2017
The BPF is collaborating with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the UN University on Computing and Society (UNU-CS) in its important endeavour to research and map projects and initiatives that aim to address different gender digital divides around the world. The objective of this collaborative data-gathering process is to help stakeholders better understand women and girls’ diverse needs in accessing and using the Internet, promoting gender equality, and investigating how ICTs can be leveraged to empower women and girls in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Gender, Labour, Technology

GenderIT.org on 23 Feb 2017
This edition on gender, labour, technology examines how gendered labour is embedded in the making of digital devices in the hardware industries spread across Asia, how inequities of gender and other dynamics of caste, race, ethnicity continue to play a role in allegedly emancipated corporate spaces across the globe, and the disturbing strands of gendered labour of volunteering and managing even in movements. Rightly so it is pointed out by many who were interviewed that it is not necessary that digital technology or the internet in and of itself plays a role in empowering women and gender non conforming people, but that it can be one of myriad tools in this long struggle.

Ten facts about your computer: Health, hardware and the toll on women

Sonia Randhawa on 21 Feb 2017
This article takes a look at where our hardware comes from, the electronics factories situated in primarily Asian countries, and the challenges facing the people, primarily women, who work there, and the issues that impact upon women workers in the electronics industry. Ten facts about your computer that illuminate the gendered nature of the labour that is embedded in our hardware.

[EDITORIAL] How Internet Technology Will Affect Rights: 3 Things to Look For

Nadine Moawad on 6 Dec 2016
Economic, social, cultural rights in international law is a recognition of the basic rights of all people to a fundamentally decent and happy life - one in which their right to self-determination is respected. Does the progressively digitised future threaten or cement a world where ESC rights are guaranteed for all? In this editorial, Nadine Moawad states that the network is good and the network is here, but there are 3 things to look out for - especially in relation to economic, social, cultural rights.

Harnessing the Internet to Realise Labour Rights in Cambodia: Interview with Alexandra Demetrianova

Radhika Radhakrishnan on 6 Dec 2016
Do internet campaigns work? This is what Alexandra Demetrianova reflects upon in her research for GISWatch about labour rights violations in garment factories of Cambodia. The internet has played a key role in the struggles of garment factory workers (mostly female) and trade unionists to demand for an increase in their minimum wage. It has also helped change consumer consciousness across the world. Some things cost more than we realise.

[COLUMN] Joining the dots: Labour, sustainability, resilience in gender and climate change

Sonia Randhawa on 17 Oct 2016
What is the connection between labour unions, women workers and climate change? This monthly column on connecting the dots between climate change and gender, explores the exploitative conditions that are still prevalent in the electronics industry. While workers in Pearl River delta in China may no longer face sweatshop conditions, the production has shifted to other poorer parts and most often to women workers.

Flash Mob Korean Style

Sonia Randhawa on 28 Jun 2012
In Seoul for the Asia Europe Foundation's Informal Meeting on Human Rights, looking at human rights and ICTs, I made a few extra-curricular stops - it was hard not to, when just outside our hotel is an ongoing protest about labour rights. The protest site has obviously been occupied for some time - they are even growing tomato plants - and is just outside a major tourist attraction. The protest involves workers who were laid off from three major corporations, all still profitable. One of the companies, Ssang-Yong, over 2,600 people were fired, and because of their economic desperation 22 took the drastic step of committing suicide.
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