transgender

The right to scream: Research on sexuality, the internet and communication

on 21 Dec 2017
This edition is an exploration of the multiple layers of the relationship between sexuality, rights and sexual expression and the internet, through the EROTICS research located in three countries in South Asia and the EROTICS global survey of sexuality and internet activists. The most emphatic finding of both the survey and research is that communication rights should be considered as part of sexual rights. That we have the right to love and live, share our lives with, express, explore our identities .. and yes, the right to scream.

[EDITORIAL] Where have all the queer women gone?

Subha Wijesiriwardena on 21 Dec 2017
In this year-end edition we look at the state of internet and sexual rights, communication rights globally, and particularly in South Asia. The editorial by Subha Wijesiriwardena looks at the place of women within the struggle for rights around sex, sexuality and sexual expression, and particularly the movement for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer people (LGBTIQ) and their rights.

The Internet, Sexual Expression and Online Violence in Nepal: Interview with LOOM, Nepal

Kumud Rana on 19 Dec 2017
LOOM is a Nepal-based feminist organisation that works towards harnessing the collective power of women through multi-generational activism especially around sexual rights and sexual citizenship. As part of the EROTICS project, LOOM has been part of two studies conducted on the internet and sexual expression and online gender based violence, and in this interview they share more about the research.

[SPECIAL EDITION] Expert on my own Experience: Conversations with Neo Musangi

Namita on 13 Sep 2017
Neo Musangi is a performing and visual artist, academic and researcher. They are non-binary (preferred pronouns: they and them). In this interview Neo talks about various things – sexuality and gender based groups, the women’s movement and feminism, the role of visual and performing art and their disgruntlement with academia, being non binary openly and publicly both online and offline.

Chelsea Manning and other political prisoners: Report from Internet Freedom Festival

on 3 Apr 2017
While Chelsea Manning has been pardoned by the Obama administration, there are still many political prisoners facing incarceration and lengthy trials for their exercise of freedom of expression and for whistle blowing. Very few countries have enacted laws that protect whistle blowers. Mallory Knodel writes about the benefit fundraiser to welcome home Chelsea Manning that took place at the Internet Freedom Festival 2017 in Valencia, Spain, and reflects on the many others who face similar charges around the world.

Gender, Labour, Technology

GenderIT.org on 23 Feb 2017
This edition on gender, labour, technology examines how gendered labour is embedded in the making of digital devices in the hardware industries spread across Asia, how inequities of gender and other dynamics of caste, race, ethnicity continue to play a role in allegedly emancipated corporate spaces across the globe, and the disturbing strands of gendered labour of volunteering and managing even in movements. Rightly so it is pointed out by many who were interviewed that it is not necessary that digital technology or the internet in and of itself plays a role in empowering women and gender non conforming people, but that it can be one of myriad tools in this long struggle.

[COLUMN] Gender Binary: Second Life, First Loves

Nadika on 30 Jan 2017
In this column, Nadika Nadja explores the world of gaming and how it opened up realms of experience for her. Second Life, an enormous immersive multiplayer game, and many other similar environments on the internet, have been revelatory and powerful spaces for people to discover aspects of themselves, particularly in terms of gender and sexuality. From shame and fear, to play and sex, and to finding comfort zones and support online, Nadika sketches out her journey for us.

Feminist Principles of the Internet [2016]

APC on 3 Oct 2016
A feminist internet works towards empowering more women and queer persons – in all our diversities – to fully enjoy our rights, engage in pleasure and play, and dismantle patriarchy. This integrates our different realities, contexts and specificities – including age, disabilities, sexualities, gender identities and expressions, socioeconomic locations, political and religious beliefs, ethnic origins, and racial markers. The following key principles are critical towards realising a feminist internet.

Your presence as a political statement: the story of Coraline Ada

Evelin Heidel - Scann on 30 Sep 2016
Interview with Coraline Ada Ehmke, best known for her exemplary work in setting up the Contributor Covenant - a code of conduct for open source projects. Coraline's life story is an inspiration for all those working for the rights of those marginalized, and their experience in free and open source software cultures. In this interview she describes the ways in which her transition has affected her career, and personal and political outlook.

Facebook's Real Name Policy: Does it actually help to keep the online community safe?

Tarryn Booysen on 19 Jul 2016
We conducted a small survey of LGBTQIA users of Facebook and asked them what do THEY think of the real-name policy. Does this policy ensure their safety which is what Facebook claims, or does it expose them online and leave them vulnerable to harassment.

The Do-It-Yourself Feminist Internet: Cyber feminist actions from Latin America

Florencia Goldsman on 19 May 2016
Informed by resistance, dissident identities, intersectional approaches, issues of sexuality and universal access to the internet, we seek a collective answer to the question: Is a feminist internet possible? This reflection is a joint undertaking with Latin American women activists advocating freer and more equitable technologies and working to saturate the net with feminist content and decolonise the media.
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