online GBV

Journeying through sexuality, activism and the internet

Njeri Gateru on 9 Nov 2017
Kenya has few protections for the people within its own country who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, or queer. In this article Njeri Gateru traces their journey and that of the organisation National Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission in Nairobi - the difficulties they have faced and their use of online tools and spaces.

Women's Gaze: Interview with Ninka Khaindrava

GenderIT.org on 7 Nov 2017
In this interview with Ninka Khaindrava, she talks about the state of activism around women's rights, labour rights and sexuality in Georgia. Ninka attended the MFI meeting in Malaysia to learn more about activists and their experiences with security and online violence in other parts of the world.

Impact for what and for whom? Digital technologies and feminist movement building

Lulú Barrera on 6 Nov 2017
Lulú Barrera(Luchadoras, Mexico) recorded a video of Srilata Batliwala (CREA, India) talking about movements, feminism, and disruption at the Making a Feminist Internet meeting in Malaysia in early October. This video and the short piece are to be read together as a dialogue between Srilatha Batliwala and “Primavera Violeta”.

Talking digital security and language with Chido Musodza

Daphne Jena on 13 Oct 2017
In this third article on the city conversation on feminist principles of the internet in Harare, Zimbabwe, Daphne Jena interviews Chido Musodza on their work around digital security, the need for security for the women’s movement and feminists, and also broadly their take on the feminist principles of the internet.

Politics of a feminist internet in Zimbabwe: Resistance and Silence

Anthea Taderera on 26 Sep 2017
In this article Anthea Taderera looks at the personal and political meaning and potentials of a feminist internet. What does it mean to imagine and create a black, African feminist space with room for archiving, theorising and engagement away/free from the surveillance and regulation of state and private parties alike?

[SPECIAL EDITION] Taking the girl's revolution online: Interview with Ghadeer Ahmed

Yara Sallam on 17 Sep 2017
Ghadeer Ahmed created Girl's Revolution on Twitter and Facebook a year after the revolution on Jan 25 2011 in Egypt. In this interview with Yara Sallam she traces the difficult and rewarding journey of talking about women's rights, body, sexuality, violence and harassment and sharing this with many other women and girls online. This interview is part of a longer one that conducted in October 2016 for EuroMedRights report "In Their Own Words". Ghadeer likes to introduce herself as a feminist writer.

[SPECIAL EDITION] Expert on my own Experience: Conversations with Neo Musangi

Namita on 13 Sep 2017
Neo Musangi is a performing and visual artist, academic and researcher. They are non-binary (preferred pronouns: they and them). In this interview Neo talks about various things – sexuality and gender based groups, the women’s movement and feminism, the role of visual and performing art and their disgruntlement with academia, being non binary openly and publicly both online and offline.

"We cannot be what we cannot see": Mapping gaps in research in gender and information society

GenderIT.org on 10 Sep 2017
The articles in this bilingual edition point to how visibility of our bodies and our stories is the starting point of a different way of being. The stories we tell of struggles and perseverance, of movements and solidarity – entangled as they are in the fine wires of technology – are necessary and essential and could be the foundations for the movement for change. This edition is not exhaustive of the gaps in the research of gender and information society, but we hope it is a starting point – a launch pad – into what has not yet been explored. Because we cannot be what we cannot see.

[SPECIAL EDITION] Observing our Observers in the Age of Social Media

Kerieva McCormick on 4 Sep 2017
Kerieva Mccormick looks at how young Roma women and girls deal with, understand, and talk about violence and harassment faced by Roma people, online and offline. This article examines the double consciousness experienced by those who live with the reality of exclusion and discrimination even now in contemporary societies, and the ways in which younger generations navigate hostility and celebrate themselves and their resilience.

IGF Best practice forum on Gender and Access (2016): Overcoming barriers to enable women's meaningful internet access

on 13 Jun 2017
The BPF is collaborating with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the UN University on Computing and Society (UNU-CS) in its important endeavour to research and map projects and initiatives that aim to address different gender digital divides around the world. The objective of this collaborative data-gathering process is to help stakeholders better understand women and girls’ diverse needs in accessing and using the Internet, promoting gender equality, and investigating how ICTs can be leveraged to empower women and girls in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Technology-mediated Violence against Women in India: Discussion paper

GenderIT.org on 9 May 2017
The purpose of this issue paper is to lay out the key legal, institutional and ethical issues concerning technology-mediated Violence against Women (VAW), to raise critical questions for further deliberation and action. This paper draws upon secondary literature in this area, and inputs from Indian feminist scholars and practitioners working in the domains of gender-based violence, women’s rights, digital rights, online violence

Did Facebook finally figure out that consent is more important than nipples?

erika on 3 May 2017
In April 2017 Facebook announced a new tool that will prevent an intimate image posted without consent from being shared further on Facebook, Messenger and Instagram. Erika Smith and Fungai Machirori go deep and debate the pros and cons of this proposed system, and how feminist-friendly and positive about alternate sexualities it is.

[COLUMN] I want to be a Pokémon master

Angélica Contreras on 13 Apr 2017
Pokémon exploded as a game that could be played on mobile phones in 2016. Of the many debates around it, Angélica Contreras explores the gendered aspect of videogames and how Pokémon struck a chord with many women in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and parts of Latin America. This article was originally written in Spanish, and is part of a column series that explores young women and their lives immersed in technology.
Syndicate content