policy

[COLUMN] Gender and community networks: Building a movement around community networks and gender equality

Nic Bidwell on 2 Aug 2018
In this third column on gender and community networks, GenderIT interviews Carlos Rey Moreno on what movement building around community networks is all about. How do we get policy makers, organisers, community based organisations and others invested and interested in community networks? And in this constellation of actors and organisations, how do we start talking about gender equality and parity.

[COLUMN] Gender and community networks: Busking in policy spaces

Kathleen Diga on 1 Aug 2018
n this column on community networks and gender, the writers will explore how communities can provide and run their own internet infrastructure, the existing forms of community networks, the legal and policy environment in which they have to exist and what are the gender dynamics around these networks. Here we interview Steve Song about the policy and regulatory environment for community networks - whether this hinders or fosters their growth, and further the presence of women in these policy spaces.

A technopolitical approach to online gender-based violence:

Mariana Fossatti on 26 Jun 2018
Technology is not gender neutral and this article shows how social media companies and tech corporations play a role in perpetuating online gender-based violence. What we need is a critical examination of the tools available and their underlying techno-politics so we can create community alternatives for feminist communication.

[COLUMN] Sanitary Panels on facing threats online (COMIC)

Sanitary Panels on 21 Jun 2018
Sanitary Panels is an ironic yet hard hitting series where social commentary masquerades as humour and makes us rethink many of our assumptions. This comic explores aspects of gender and technology including discrimination faced by women in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) education and careers. In this comic Sanitary Panels looks at how police and society react when women complain of threats, harassment and violence online.

We can be heroes: Towards public and legal recognition of online gender-based violence

GenderIT.org on 17 Jun 2018
Online violence, bullying, harassment, theft of identity, non-consensual circulation of intimate images - are now being recognised as offences in most countries, and acknowledged in public discourse as misogyny and attempts to silence women and gender-diverse people from participation in public life and denying them their rights to free expression and association, especially online. This bilingual edition (English and Spanish) looks at new and emerging issues in relation to online gender-based violence (GBV) in Malaysia, Egypt, India, Palestine, north America, Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and various other countries and contexts.

[EDITORIAL] Recognition of online GBV in international law: the highs and lows

Jan Moolman on 17 Jun 2018
Over a decade of consistent work around visibility of online GBV has led to finally a report by the Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women that specifically addresses this phenomenon. Jan Moolman sketches out a brief timeline of the milestones towards the recognition of online GBV, and this has included advocating for inclusion of sensitive language within international law and resolutions, campaigns in different parts of the world, detailed research and reports on different forms of online GBV and technology-facilitated violence, especially in the global South, and so on.

Do we need new laws to address non-consensual circulation of intimate images: the case of Brazil

Mariana Valente on 17 Jun 2018
The choice between developing new laws and frameworks for cyber offences or to work with existing laws is a dilemma faced in many countries in the global South. In this article, the legal solutions to non consensual intimate images are examined from the perspective of women who have been victimised. What do we want and expect from our legal and judicial mechanisms? How can these be more accessible, and how do we ensure equality for women of different backgrounds?

Cyber violence against women: the case of Bangladesh

Farhana Akter on 17 Jun 2018
Violence against women online is shaped by historical, cultural and social factors and this article explores the specific context of Bangladesh. This includes specific targeting of public women and journalists online and the exploitation of women by those they have intimate relationships with. Far from being an "elite white country problem", this article shows how women in the global South have to deal with various forms of online gender-based violence and ineffective policing and judicial systems.

Hidden figures - A look at technology-mediated violence against women in India

Anita Gurumurthy on 11 Jun 2018
IT for Change held a consultation in 2017 on the various forms of gender based cyber violence that affects women in India. Here various researchers and speakers gathered to share their data, insight and questions on the kinds of online violence faced by women in different professions, strata and social locations - from vernacular journalists to students in colleges, rural and urban women. This article also looks at various legal mechanisms and solutions offered by the state and what could be the way to address online violence.

Breaking online gender-based violence

Serene Lim on 6 Jun 2018
An understanding of online gender-based violence as part of the structure of cultural and social violence that women face is essential to finding solutions or to combat it. In this article Serene Lim delves into what could be feminist legal approaches to online GBV, the alleged opposition to free speech and the multi-generational work required to dismantle frameworks of patriarchal oppression.

[COLUMN] Sanitary Panels: Your average MANEL (comic)

Sanitary Panels on 12 Apr 2018
Sanitary Panels does a web comic series on gender and technology including discrimination faced by women in STEM education and careers. Here is a poster for yet another manel i.e. a panel with only male speakers on a topic on which many qualified women experts are there.

What do women’s rights have to do with the SDGs and the Internet?

Sachini Perera on 1 Aug 2017
The sustainable development goals explicitly mention gender equality, yet how will this be achieved and how is this linked to the potentially transformative role that ICTs could play. If the SDGs are going to use ICTs as a vehicle to achieve the goals then we need to use an intersectional and multi-pronged approach to ensure that women, girls and other marginalized groups are not left behind.

Technology-mediated Violence against Women in India: Discussion paper

GenderIT.org on 9 May 2017
The purpose of this issue paper is to lay out the key legal, institutional and ethical issues concerning technology-mediated Violence against Women (VAW), to raise critical questions for further deliberation and action. This paper draws upon secondary literature in this area, and inputs from Indian feminist scholars and practitioners working in the domains of gender-based violence, women’s rights, digital rights, online violence

Internet use barriers and user strategies: perspectives from Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa and Rwanda

Chenai Chair on 28 Mar 2017
The introduction of OTT services that replace regular messaging applications in built into a phone, definitely has an impact on internet use. OTT services have become the main entry point to the Internet for most users in the prepaid mobile environment that characterises most African markets. This comparative country study, based on focus groups conducted in November 2016 in Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda and South Africa, sought to develop evidence of why people, use the Internet the way they do, specifically when their data is subsidised. The study is meant to inform policy making and especially discourse around internet rights.

IGF 2015 Best Practice Forum: Online Abuse and Gender-Based Violence Against Women Report

on 12 Jan 2016
The 2015 IGF Best Practice Forum (BPF) on Online Abuse and Gender-Based Violence Against Women used an open and inclusive process to gather a broad variety of views and inputs on this multidimensional problem over nine months. As a result of this community-driven process, the BPF’s draft findings reflect a rich diversity of responses from various stakeholders and regions regarding the issue.
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