representation of women

[COLUMN] How women in the Global South are RECLAIMING SOCIAL MEDIA to promote body positivity

Samukelisiwe Mabaso on 11 Jul 2017
In this column, Samukelisiwe explores how women in the global South have started using social media to make up for the lack of representation of black and brown women in mainstream media. Women of colour, people with disability, gender non conforming persons and others now use the internet to explore their image and their body, and form communities that celebrate different ways of being.

Join APC's campaign and events at the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women in New York

Flavia Fascendini on 6 Mar 2015
Between 9 and 20 March, APC's Women's Rights Programme members will be attending the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women in New York. This year the main focus of the session will be on the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which turns 20. How far have we come, and how can you participate?

The coming of (digital) age: How African feminists are using the internet to change women's lives

Minna Salami on 5 May 2014
In this article, the writer Minna Salami states that while the digital wave is marked by more diversity than previous feminist waves, with people of all walks of life contributing, it is nevertheless predominantly the ways that white/western feminists challenge patriarchal structures using the internet that has garnered attention. "However, important milestones of the global feminist struggle go ignored if we look only at the ways that the white/western feminist movement uses the internet," she adds. The fact is that feminists everywhere are using new technologies to fundamentally change society but the achievements of online feminisms in Africa, for instance, are hardly known within the continent, let alone outside it. Salami challenges this general trend by sharing a few examples on how African feminists are using the internet to change society.

IGF 2012: Day two in room four

Kateřina Fialová on 23 Nov 2012
What I most value about the IGF is that thanks to its multi-stakeholder principle, it widens my perspective on pressing internet governance issues. However, all three sessions I attended on day two in room number four, while talking about human rights, failed to include women's right perspective. Women internet users are important stakeholder and it is evident that even after six years of existence IGF still fails to engage them in equal footing with other stakeholders.

Gender Peripheries of the 2012 Internet Governance Forum

Kateřina Fialová on 22 Nov 2012
The 7th Internet Governance Forum in Baku drew to a close two weeks ago. "Avri Doria in her introduction to this edition":http://www.genderit.org/node/3709 discusses several breakthroughs made by this the world’s most important internet governance encounter. For the first time the forum has openly discussed human rights on the internet, and has not been silent on the autocracy and abuse of basic freedoms in the host country. Also for the first time in the IGF history, women's rights have been brought to the main stage. However, gender aspects of human rights on the internet, such as the serious abuses women face because of what they say online, are still absent in the debates. Read reflections of GenderIT.org's partners and writers about their experiences at the IGF.

Women at the IGF: Now we need to mainstream gender

Sonia Randhawa on 22 Nov 2012
This year's Internet Governance Forum came to a close in Baku, Azerbaijan on 16 November. GenderIT.org contributor Sonia Randhawa spoke to three women about their experiences at the IGF, and whether any progress is being made in terms of the representation of women, and the prominence of women's rights and gender as cross-cutting issues for internet goverance. Jac sm Kee is from Malaysia and represented the APC Women's Rights Programme; GenderIT.org editor Katerina Fialova is from the Czech Republic; and Bosnian Valentina Pellizzer is executive director of OneWorld SouthEast Europe.

Women's take on internet governance: A selection of tweets from IGF 2012

Flavia Fascendini on 20 Nov 2012
This is a selection of the tweets circulated during the Internet Governance Forum in Baku, Azerbaijan, from November 6-9 2012. They were selected following the criteria of its relevance in reflecting the discussions around women’s role in internet governance processes, as well as women’s and internet rights during the IGF.

Censorship walks, a feminist view of the Internet Governance Forum

hvale on 15 Nov 2012
A big hangar, with a constant voice asking people to wear headphones and talk to each other through the microphones, an internet network that does not allow participants to be online simultaneously, with an average of only one person out of three being able to access full online services and the other two struggling with their different devices to reach out, comment and communicate what is happening and what should not have happened.

IGF 2012 - Access and Diversity Main Session

on 12 Nov 2012
This is the transcript of the Access and Diversity Main Session that took place on November 8 2012 at the Internet Governance Forum in Baku, Azerbaijan. It was the first time in the entire history of the IGF that women and gender issues were addressed in a main session, with the presence of Jac sm Kee from APC Women´s Rights Programme.

Again, representation not reflecting participation

Yara Sallam on 8 Nov 2012
Attending the IGF for the first time came with no expectations, however it is difficult to ignore the usual disparity that I face everyday in Egypt, and in many other countries when I travel. No one can say that the number of women participating in the IGF 2012 is low, in fact women are very much present representing the different stakeholders; governments, private companies, and civil society representatives. So if the opening session of IGF had only two women speakers – which one of them was representing another man?

Multistakeholderism and Enhanced Cooperation: What's it all about?

Jac sm Kee on 7 Nov 2012
Multistakeholder participation and enhanced cooperation seems to be one of the major issue in this year's Internet Governance Forum (IGF). With <a href="https://www.apc.org/en/news/apc-perspectives-revision-international-telecommun/">World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT)</a> around the corner and the anxious buzz of whether this is a bid by governments to have more control over the internet through the International Telecommunication Regulations (ITRs) and International Telecommunications Union (ITU), the proposals for new governing bodies like CIRP and the discussions on “enhanced cooperation” by the Commission on Science and Technology for Development (CSTD) in May earlier this year – maybe not surprising.

IGF Gender Report Cards

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 18 Oct 2011
APC WNSP is sharing some preliminary results of the gender report cards initiative. This was a pilot initiative put forward by the Association for Progressive Communications to monitor and assess the level of gender parity and inclusion at this year's Internet Governance Forum (IGF). Although the numbers of sessions monitored were relatively small, and that a deeper analysis is needed, the statistics generated and first impressions can give us an idea of the role that women and gender issues played in this IGF's debates.

Gender Peripheries of the 2011 Internet Governance Forum

Kateřina Fialová on 18 Oct 2011
Year after year the Internet Governance Forum renews expectations and opportunities of gender advocates to find innovative solutions to enhance women's rights online and offline. After 6 years of activism, this space still seems to be resistant to the inclusion of gender perspectives and activists are faced with more questions than answers. Where are women's rights on the internet governance agenda? How to get the women's movements more involved within this new arena of public policy? How to replace the protectionist approach that traditionally surrounds women's rights defence with one that is rights-based? Along with Jennifer Radloff who introduces this edition we believe it is a responsibility of all stakeholders to make women's rights relevant and visible in the IGF debates, and to do so gender analysis and women's participation needs to be much more institucionalised in the planning of the next IGF.

Scoring participation – how does change happen for women in the IGF

Jennifer Radloff on 17 Oct 2011
During the years of my school and university studies, report cards caused me high levels of anxiety but with some underlying optimism. Report cards assumed all-knowing experts were making decisions around my abilities and progress. It would invariably be a measure of success or failure and would expose my weak points and (hopefully) highlight my positive traits. But they always had a judgemental and antagonistic picture in my mind...

Stripping the IGF bare: where are women´s rights?

Flavia Fascendini on 17 Oct 2011
GenderIT.org's editors, Flavia Fascendini and Katerina Fialova, speak with the APC WNSP members who took part at the Sixth Internet Governance Forum that took place in Nairobi, Kenya from 27-30 September 2011. In the interview, Chat García Ramilo, Dafne Sabanes Plou, Jac sm Kee, Jan Moolman, and Jennifer Radloff from the APC Women´s Programme offer their insights regarding gender balance and the presence of women's rights in the 2011 IGF agenda.
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