take back the tech!

10 years of Take Back the Tech!

GenderIT.org on 16 Nov 2016
Technology facilitates violence against women, but it also facilitates information sharing, capacity building, networking and alternative media - Take back the tech! is the realisation of the idea that the internet can be used to expand the movement against all forms of gender-based violence. This edition brings to us the voices from the campaigns from the Democratic Republic of Congo to Canada, Bosnia-Herzegovina to India, that not only push back on the growing amounts of online VAW, but actively claim the internet as a space, a forum, a playground and a hope for women and gender non-conforming people, and also queer and trans people.

In Search of Allies: Interview with TBTT campaigners in India

Smita on 15 Nov 2016
In this set of interviews, Smita Vanniyar speaks to Japleen Pasricha of Feminism in India, and Divya Rajgopal of WhyHate. In separate ways, both these are projects of passion that find ways to reclaim technology for women and also others marginalised on account of gender non-conformity, sexuality, caste, religion and class. They discuss the pros and cons of anonymity, how to address online VAW and how to raise issues that are difficult and troublesome.

Technology as lingua franca: Interview with Caroline Tagny

Bianca Baldo on 15 Nov 2016
A detailed conversation with activist and writer Caroline Tagny on the various campaigns that she has been part of with Take Back the Tech. The interviewer, Bianca Baldo, focuses on the politics of language in these various campaigns and the importance of content in local language to connect to and bring together people and movements. The role of French as both a language of the colonial oppressor and a common language in countries in West and Central Africa and parts of Canada has particularly played out in these campaigns.

V for Vale: 10 year journey of TBTT! Campaign in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Lamia Kosovic on 14 Nov 2016
Vale Pellizzer looks back at the 10 year journey of the TBTT campaign in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The campaign has taken various shapes in the complicated realities and social dynamics of this country. The fresh and young design of the campaign promised a new hope for reclaiming your agency for women and gender non-conforming people. In this interview Vale talks about the complexities of translating a global campaign to the local realities.

At the cutting edge: TBTT campaigner Francoise Mukuku in DRC

Tarryn Booysen on 14 Nov 2016
When the TBTT campaign took off in Democratic Republic of Congo, there were few takers. Women rights' activists combatting VAW didn't understand the role ICTs could play in either propagating violence, or in activism. Now other Francophone countries approach SJS to learn more about the ways in which this cutting edge campaign is changing conversations around technology related VAW and reclaiming tech for women in the DRC.

[EDITORIAL] Taking back the tech for 10 years!

Sara Baker on 14 Nov 2016
Ten years ago it was hard to explain what is gender based violence online, while now there is some recognition of the widespread misogyny and violence that exists in online spaces towards women and gender non conforming people. It took a decade of tough, dedicated work by women all over the world that finally put technology-related violence in the spotlight. This edition is a collection of interviews with women who have taken back ownership and celebrated their power through technology in various campaigns across the globe from Bosnia-Herzegovina to Democratic Republic of Congo. Enjoy taking back the tech with us!

Statement: Facts on #TakeBacktheTech

APC on 12 Oct 2015
The attack against APC and Take Back the Tech and efforts to hijack the #takebackthetech hashtag, which has involved people who self-associate with #Gamergate posting threats targeting members of our community and images that depict women being subjected to physical and sexual violence, illustrate how women’s and girls’ voices are silenced on social networking platforms by violent and sexist expression.

Analysis of incidents reported on the “Take Back the Tech!” Ushahidi platform

Kateřina Fialová on 9 Sep 2015
This report provides an overview of data concerning violence against women (VAW) online collected using the Association for Progressive Communications' (APC) online mapping tool. The purpose of the mapping tool, which was set up as part of APC's “End Violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project, was to improve APC’s existing framework for categorising online rights violations, and develop a deeper understanding of the nature and consequences of technology-related VAW. This report is intended primarily as a quantitative overview of the cases reported, with some qualitative illustration. The data is analysed from 2012 to mid-2014.

Why I decided to study feminist activism on social media

Sujatha Subramanian on 15 Jun 2015
"As part of my research, I found it important to not just study and document such instances of misogynistic violence in online spaces but also instances of activism, of resistance, of solidarity," states Sujatha Subramanian in this great article that tracks back the path she walked to write "From the streets to the web: Looking at feminist activism on social media".

Twitter lessons learned: WAM!'s report reveals findings that support and enhance APC's research

Sara Baker on 1 Jun 2015
In late 2014 the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) began publishing findings from our seven-country End Violence research project, which included an analysis of Twitter's reporting procedures. Case studies that involved abuse on Twitter and steps the company could take to improve the safety of their platform. Around the same time, the US organisation Women, Action and the Media (WAM!) became an authorised reporter on Twitter, which meant they could receive harassment reports directly from users and escalate them with Twitter staff.

From the streets to the web: Looking at feminist activism on social media

Sujatha Subramanian on 1 Jun 2015
Does social media enable forming networks of solidarity between different marginalised groups? Is there a space for non-normative discourses such as the discourse on pleasure? Does digital technology aid in the construction of feminist counter-publics? These are some of the questions explored in this paper. Power relations that operate through social media, including forms of gendered and sexualised violence, are also discussed.

Take Back the Tech! campaign wins The Bobs award in People’s Choice for English category

Flavia Fascendini on 29 May 2015
Among over 4,800 submissions, APC’s Take Back the Tech! campaign was recognised with the prestigious award The Bobs in the People’s Choice for English category.

Reporting, reviewing, and responding to harassment on Twitter

This report was produced at the request of Women, Action, and the Media (WAM!). From November 6–26 2014, WAM! took in reports of Twitter-based harassment, assessed them, and escalated reports as necessary to Twitter for special attention. This document presents fidings from this three-week project; it draws on both quantitative and qualitative methods.

The art of smashing things

Mohammad Tarakiyee on 7 Apr 2015
In the last couple of years, I have found myself getting angry often. Working for social justice means seeing, analysing, and talking about injustice a lot. It's important to expose injustice and be exposed to it, and I'll get to that later, but it's also hard sometimes to hold your anger about all that's unfair and ugly in the world. I would get so angry sometimes I felt like smashing things, throwing a rock through a window.

Women: Strengthening communication on the internet to improve rights

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 7 Apr 2015
After four years working as an advocate of sexual and reproductive rights, Lorena M., had already gathered quite an experience for the type of insults that could come across her path in meetings and public events. But she never thought her life would get dangerously complicated when anonymous hands hacked the defenders’ network site and began receiving insults and threats of all kinds in her e-mail and social networks’ accounts.
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