uganda

What does internet policy mean for the average Ugandan?

Kembabazi Gloria on 3 Dec 2015
The word “internet” is not well understood in its full and wholesome context by a size-able number of Ugandans and perhaps the majority. Smart phone usage has grown tremendously and with it the gospel of this thing called the internet. Of course with smart phones come the popularisation of social media and the applications that simplify internet use and access. It would seem that internet familiarisation has grown with these new gadgets.

Uganda urgently needs to prioritise gender equality online

Irene Murungi on 19 Sep 2015
Ahead of the launch of our Women’s Rights Online research, this series of guest blogs features on-the-ground perspectives from each of our research partners around the world. In this post, Irene Murungi, Gender Policy Officer at Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET), talks about why it’s important to get more Ugandan women online and involved in internet policy debates.

Gender dynamics need to be addressed in communications surveillance in Uganda

Flavia Fascendini on 4 Dec 2014
The incident involving the prime minister highlights why there is growing concern over the governance and regulation of communication surveillance, and how it is being used to infringe on one’s right to privacy in Uganda. Because this case affected a high-ranking Ugandan official, the question is, how safe is the ordinary Ugandan? And from a gender activist perspective, what are the gender concerns in the emerging policy and regulatory environment? Two recent studies on internet freedoms in Uganda were conducted by Unwanted Witness and Collaboration on International ICT Policy in East and Southern Africa (CIPESA). While both studies review the communications surveillance environment in Uganda, there is no specific focus on issues of concern by gender. However, both studies did raise various concerns that are relevant to women’s use of the internet and social media.

Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill – a great blow to internet freedom

Flavia Fascendini on 5 Mar 2014
One month after Nigeria's president signed into law a harsh law criminalising sexual minorities, Uganda has followed suit by signing it's own “anti-gay”, as dubbed by the media, bill. Joining Tanzania, Mauritania, Sudan and Sierra Leone, Uganda and Nigeria have join the club of countries in the continent where the LGBT is criminalise under the harshest sentences: offenders can receive life imprisonment for homosexual acts. Throughout our work on EROTICS, we have confirmed the importance of the internet for sexual rights activists in performing their work. What does this new law means for the empowerment and the capacity to advocate for sexual rights of activists in Uganda? Does the ongoing harassment and now criminalisation of the LGBT community transposes to the online environment? We asked KDM, internet rights and sexual rights activist in Uganda to answer those questions.

Statement: International Coalition Condemns Human Rights Violations Against W.O.N.E.T.H.A

WHRD IC on 1 Aug 2012
The Women Human Rights Defenders International Coalition (WHRD IC) has expressed deep concern regarding the safety of five staff from the Uganda sex worker organization, Women’s Organization Network for Human Rights Advocacy (WONETHA). On May 7, police authorities raided WONETHA's small office and arrested two staff and three members. The staff members face ongoing harassment and criminal charges. This is among others an attack on WONETHA and sex workers' freedom of association, assembly, speech and expression.

Digital Security: Drop-in centre of Ugandan sex worker organisation raided

on 17 May 2012
“Sex work may be illegal in Uganda, but providing services for sex workers is clearly not,” reads a statement put out on May 9 by WONETHA, a health and human rights organisation, in reaction to a serious crack-down on its activities by Ugandan municipal police.

Power of communication - addressing violence in post-conflict situation (video, 16mins)

Kateřina Fialová on 7 Mar 2011
Harriet Musoke presents the work of Isis-Women’s International Cross Cultural Exchange (Isis-WICCE) and their approach to technology in addressing violence in post-conflict situation. Isis-WICCE is one of more than sixty groups funded by 'Take Back the Tech! small grants' fund, and using information technologies in their work to end violence against women. This presentation was part of the "Take Back The Tech! Reclaiming technology for women's rights" session at the 55th Commission on the Status of Women, on 25 February 2011.

Uganda: Violence against Women and Information Communication Technologies

Kateřina Fialová on 2 Jun 2010
Aramanzan Madanda, Berna Ngolobe and Goretti Zavuga Amuriat look at how ICTs have been used to help provide spaces for women and sexual minorities. Sexual minorities have a presence on the internet to articulate concerns of members and raise awareness. Women’s mobile phone use is controlled by their husbands, who either give or withold permission to use and dictate when and how. Some women have acquired two SIM cards to forestall domestic violence. The authors view this as a sign of women’s empowerment as telephones provide a means through which to break male control by opening contacts to the outside world.
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