violence against women

Why I decided to study feminist activism on social media

Sujatha Subramanian on 15 Jun 2015
"As part of my research, I found it important to not just study and document such instances of misogynistic violence in online spaces but also instances of activism, of resistance, of solidarity," states Sujatha Subramanian in this great article that tracks back the path she walked to write "From the streets to the web: Looking at feminist activism on social media".

Technology-related VAW addressed by report of Special Rapporteur on violence against women

Flavia Fascendini on 15 Jun 2015
The report produced by the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences contains the findings following her visit to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from March to April 2014. The report flags technology-related violence as one of the ways in which VAW manifests, pointing specially to online harmful behaviours such as humiliation, harassment, intimidation and “sexting”.

Gender violence on the internet: The Philippine experience

Lisa Garcia on 15 Jun 2015
The Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA) prepared this country report as part of the broader study conducted by the Association for Progressive Communications on "End violence: Women’s rights and safety online," which involve seven different countries. It looks into the existing legal remedies and corporate policies in the Philippines as they relate to technology-related violence against women (VAW).

Philippines: Exploring technology-related violence against women and children

GenderIT.org on 8 Jun 2015
We’re back! – with the second in a series of seven mini-editions highlighting APC’s project “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online”. Each edition focuses on one country where we carried out the research, and this time round, we’ll look at the Philippines. Bringing together articles, key findings and an interview with the research team, this edition looks at cases ranging from celebrity sex videos to child pornography, and draws attention to various socio-economic realities in the Philippines. Based on research carried out by communication rights organisation Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA), here we explore various facets of technology-related violence against women and children in the Philippines.

Of celebrity sex tapes and child porn: talking about technology-related violence in the Philippines

Syar S. Alia on 8 Jun 2015
The Philippines was one of seven countries covered by APC’s research project “End violence: Women's rights and safety online”. The research in the Philippines was done in association with the Foundation for Media Alternatives (FMA). Here, Syar S. Alia speaks to FMA’s programme coordinator for gender and ICT, Lisa S. Garcia, to take a closer look at the research findings.

Twitter lessons learned: WAM!'s report reveals findings that support and enhance APC's research

Sara Baker on 1 Jun 2015
In late 2014 the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) began publishing findings from our seven-country End Violence research project, which included an analysis of Twitter's reporting procedures. Case studies that involved abuse on Twitter and steps the company could take to improve the safety of their platform. Around the same time, the US organisation Women, Action and the Media (WAM!) became an authorised reporter on Twitter, which meant they could receive harassment reports directly from users and escalate them with Twitter staff.

Pakistan country report: Technology driven violence against women

GenderIT.org on 30 May 2015
Technology based violence is exposing women to the entire spectrum of conceivable harms in Pakistan. Victims of technology based violence have suffered physical violence ranging from rape to attempted assassination, psycho-social harms and loss of development opportunities. This was revealed in a research report launched by Bytes for All, Pakistan in Islamabad.

Defending the Defenders: Short review of Nobel Women’s Initiative Conference

OneWorldSEE on 29 May 2015
Women’s human rights defenders use technology to document, communicate, generate changes, but at the same time technology is used to bully and abuse themselves, the Defenders. Army of trolls flood personal profiles of defenders on social media profiles with threats, offenses and aggressive counter campaigns. Government agencies, narco-mafia and religious extremists spy defenders, hunt them and – execute them.

Take Back the Tech! campaign wins The Bobs award in People’s Choice for English category

Flavia Fascendini on 29 May 2015
Among over 4,800 submissions, APC’s Take Back the Tech! campaign was recognised with the prestigious award The Bobs in the People’s Choice for English category.

Time to update the Section J on women’s real needs

Bianca Baldo on 29 May 2015
Twenty years after the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the specific elaboration of Section J on women and the media, the review resolution does not reflect the impact that ICTs have proven to have on women’s lives, as a means to dramatically advance or hinder women’s rights. In this interview by Bianca Baldo for GenderIT.org, APC’s Jennifer Radloff and Sara Baker agree that we should move away from participating in panels for side-events at the Commission on the Status of Women, and focus instead on working with governments to co-organise high-level panels on issues relating to Section J, as well as working with other women's rights organisations that are interested in the feminist principles of the internet and together strategise on how to influence agendas. They also agree on a crucial issue that is overlooked by governments: Section J is about women's voices.

Of cultural controls and gender inequality: Talking about technology-related violence against women in Pakistan

GenderIT.org on 29 May 2015
Pakistan was one of seven countries covered by APC’s research project “End violence: Women's rights and safety online”. The research in Pakistan was done in association with Bytes for All, a human rights organisation that focuses on ICTs. Here, GenderIT.org speaks to the manager of advocacy and outreach at Bytes for All, Furhan Hussain, to bring us a closer look into the research findings.

JK Rowling, prom queen and homophobic warzones

Tarryn Booysen on 2 May 2015
DJ's choice is a weekly section by GenderIT.org, exploring the depths of the web to provide you once a week with a top 5 of creative, interesting and informative pieces and resources on gender and ICTs. Delight yourself with this selection of “sparks”: Good readings, interesting links, videos, pictures, cool authors to point to, amazing tools, and much more. Send us interesting material to genderit at apcwomen.org or tweet us your links using #genderit.

Reporting, reviewing, and responding to harassment on Twitter

This report was produced at the request of Women, Action, and the Media (WAM!). From November 6–26 2014, WAM! took in reports of Twitter-based harassment, assessed them, and escalated reports as necessary to Twitter for special attention. This document presents fidings from this three-week project; it draws on both quantitative and qualitative methods.

Copyrighted breasts, the Avengers and it was never a dress

Tarryn Booysen on 29 Apr 2015
DJ's choice is a weekly section by GenderIT.org, exploring the depths of the web to provide you once a week with a top 5 of creative, interesting and informative pieces and resources on gender and ICTs. Delight yourself with this selection of “sparks”: Good readings, interesting links, videos, pictures, cool authors to point to, amazing tools, and much more. Send us interesting material to genderit at apcwomen.org or tweet us your links using #genderit.

The elimination and prevention of all forms of violence against women and girls

on 20 Apr 2015
These agreed conclusions produced by the 57th session of the Commission on the Status of Women strongly condemn all forms of violence against women and girls and urge States to recognize that sexual and gender-based violence affects victims and survivors, families, communities and societies.
Syndicate content