violence against women

Violence against women online: What next steps intermediaries should take

Rafia Shaikh on 8 Jan 2015
In the response to abuse and threats that women face, are the technology big names like Facebook, Twitter and others taking tangible steps? In this article, GenderIT.org collaborator Rafia Shaikh explores the most outstanding points from a new research report developed by Rima Athar for the APC’s “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project on Improving Corporate Policies, which talks about specific problems and guidelines on how internet intermediaries can improve their response to VAW online.

End violence: Case studies from the Philippines

Flavia Fascendini on 22 Dec 2014
These case summaries are based on in-depth case studies mapping women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their attempts to access justice either through domestic legal remedy or corporate grievance mechanisms. The original case studies from the Philippines were documented by country researchers from the project partner Foundation for Media Alternatives between November 2013 and April 2014 and the summaries were prepared by Richa Kaul Padte.

End violence: Case studies from Pakistan

Flavia Fascendini on 22 Dec 2014
These case summaries are based on in-depth case studies mapping women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their attempts to access justice either through domestic legal remedy or corporate grievance mechanisms. The original case studies from Pakistan were documented by country researchers from the project partner Bytes for All Pakistan between November 2013 and April 2014 and the summaries were prepared by Richa Kaul Padte.

End violence: Case studies from Kenya

on 22 Dec 2014
These case summaries are based on in-depth case studies mapping women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their attempts to access justice either through domestic legal remedy or corporate grievance mechanisms. The original case studies from Kenya were documented by country researchers from the project partner International Association of Women in Radio and Television (IAWRT) Kenya between November 2013 and April 2014 and the summaries were prepared by Richa Kaul Padte.

End violence: Case studies from Colombia

Colnodo on 22 Dec 2014
These case summaries are based on in-depth case studies mapping women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their attempts to access justice either through domestic legal remedy or corporate grievance mechanisms. The original case studies from Colombia were documented by country researchers from the project partner Colnodo between November 2013 and April 2014 and the summaries were prepared by Richa Kaul Padte.

End violence: Case studies from Bosnia and Herzegovina

OneWorldSEE on 22 Dec 2014
These case summaries are based on in-depth case studies mapping women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their attempts to access justice either through domestic legal remedy or corporate grievance mechanisms. The original case studies from Bosnia and Herzegovina were documented by country researchers from the project partner OneWorldSEE between November 2013 and April 2014 and the summaries were prepared by Richa Kaul Padte.

Apps by and for women

Florencia Goldsman on 12 Dec 2014
Programming and creating our own applications or apps is about understanding programming codes, taking control and adapting invisible mechanisms. We need to appropriate technical language and create instruments suited to our needs. In this article, Florencia Goldsman shares the cases of two apps that show how technology can be made by and for women.

Highlights on tech-related violence against women in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Mexico and the Philippines

Flavia Fascendini on 12 Dec 2014
APC's "End violence: Women's rights and safety online" project has achieved several milestones in the last few years, through the engagement of seven country partners who have explored the dynamics of tech-related violence against women (VAW) in their local contexts, and worked with different stakeholders in the process. 2014 opened up new possibilities and challenges for partners, and APCNews interviewed Valentina Pellizzer from OWPSEE, Erika Smith from Mexico, and Lisa García from the Foundation for Media Alternatives to get a sense of where they are at in their work against tech-related VAW.

10 tips for challenging internet-based gender-discrimination and online harassment against women and girls

on 10 Dec 2014
If you know how to use the technology, you can avoid becoming a victim. Before speaking out, it is important to take your time to understand the way the internet works.

Protecting the right to freedom of expression: Strategies of survivors of tech-related violence against women

Bianca Baldo on 8 Dec 2014
Tech-related violence against women hinders freedom of expression (FOE) as it creates an environment of fear, intimidation, violence, social isolation and impunity. This article written for GenderIT.org by Bianca Baldo explores the effects of tech-related VAW on women's rights to FOE, providing insight on human rights law, the different forms of tech-related VAW, the reasons behind it, the weaknesses in the responses, and the strategies used by online tech-related VAW survivors.

Virtual is real: Attempts to legally frame technology-related violence in a decentralized universe

Lamia Kosovic on 8 Dec 2014
In this article written for GenderIT.org, Lamia Kosovic explores some trends in legislation addressing tech-related VAW and stresses that “legislation itself will not solve the problem of VAW in digital spaces,” affirming that laws have to be accompanied by educational campaigns on the gendered nature of harm in digital spaces. “And it is urgent to expand our understanding of what survivors are experiencing, so we can be more productive in informing the systemic change needed to address this issue,” she adds.

Mapping as a strategy to disclose online violence against women

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 8 Dec 2014
When the APC Women's Rights Programme decided to use the Ushahidi map to collect information about the online violence that many women around the world were enduring, the aim was to gather evidence and show how ICTs can be used to perpetrate violence against women. In two years, from July 2012 to July 2014, almost 500 cases denouncing the use of ICTs and online spaces to perpetrate violence against women have been uploaded onto the map. Though cases come from very different countries, they share many things in common. In this article by Dafne Sabanes Plou, the author compiles the main findings achieved through this platform, such as the average age of the victims/survivors, the type of harm inflicted, the platform used to perpetrate the harm, which are the different kind of perpetrators, and the action taken after the incident.

Difficulties in documenting: Why it can be hard for women to speak out

Sara Baker on 30 Nov 2014
I've been trying to interview women and girls for the documentation action that Take Back the Tech! announced. I've found it's more difficult than I anticipated, so I wanted to explore the reasons why because I think they are directly related to the theme of freedom of expression.

APC's Women's Rights Programme statement: Forwarding violence is violence

APC on 21 Nov 2014
The Association for Progressive Communications Women’s Rights Programme (APC WRP) rejects and condemns systemic, technology-related violence against women in all its expressions. The acts of recording, photographing and documenting acts of sexual violence and further distribution and sharing are all part of the violence. With each view, share and forward, people are continuing and replicating the violence. These actions are not separate from structures of gender inequality and discrimination that enable sexual harassment, violence and assault to perpetuate.

Violence silences: Document. Challenge. Reclaim our right to expression

on 17 Nov 2014
How do you challenge existing inequalities by speaking up? When you voice your thoughts, do you face threats and abuse? How is violence used to disrupt solidarity and collective action where you are? How do you fight back? This year's Take Back the Tech! campaign invites you to help us reframe the conversation about violence against women as a violation of our fundamental human right to freedom of expression. Get involved!
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