whrds

Tangled, like wool - Sex, sexuality and the internet in India

Bishakha Datta on 10 Jul 2013
A recent survey of sexual rights activists in India shows that most consider the internet an integral part of their activism. Tangled, Like Wool explores several intertwined questions arising from this: What does the internet bring to sexual rights activism? Do the online and the offline complement each other in this kind of activism? How does keeping the internet free and open strengthen sexuality rights? And why do these seemingly disparate domains - 'sexual rights' and 'internet rights' - need to come closer together?

How activism shapes your experience of being a citizen on the internet

Jennifer Radloff on 9 Jul 2013
What does it mean to use the internet freely and fully? What freedom do you have to express who you are, how you live your life, what you desire, dream and believe in on the internet? And how safely can you communicate, contribute, exist, navigate and be in the spaces online that can so powerfully connect you to communities and knowledges that build our sense of self? This article written by Jennifer Radloff explores the ways in which activism shapes the experience of being a citizen on the internet, focusing mainly on safety issues experienced by sexual rights activists.

A human rights defender: talking about international support

Yara Sallam on 6 Feb 2013
Who is a human rights defender? Who is a woman human rights defender? Is he the one with the fancy camera and tweeting for his thousands of followers? Is she the one with the cute face and a good English accent? Who are the ones 'we' consider worth our admiration, and more importantly now it seems, worthy of support, coverage and highlighting from international organizations and media?

‘Feminist Cyborgs: Activism, Fundraising and Security Online’: register now for AFF and APC webinar

on 15 Nov 2012
This webinar will examine the idea of the feminist cyborg. The feminist cyborg is at home both online and offline, and her activism is reflected in her online life (whether it is through blogs, tweets and general online presence) as well as in what she does offline (working for a feminist organization, working with women’s rights organizations and social justice movements, or in progressive media).

Interview with Arzu Geybullayeva on the internet rights of women in Azerbaijan

Nighat Dad on 9 Nov 2012
Nighat Dad from "Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan":http://www.digitalrightsfoundation.pk speaks to Arzu Geybullayeva, a regional analyst and a blogger from Azerbaijan. Arzu's areas of interest are regional politics, conflict resolution, and new social media. In their "feminist talk” Nighat asks Arzu about her impressions of the 7th Internet Governance Forum, that took place in Baku, and key internet rights issues faced by women in Azerbaijan.

Women human rights defenders and digital security: Reflections with a Latin American accent

Daysi Flores on 5 Nov 2012
A survey of women human rights defenders (WHRDs) conducted as part of APC’s Connect Your Rights! campaign revealed some interesting practices and perceptions in terms of their use of information and communications technologies in their work. Daysi Flores, a GenderIT.org contributor, analyses the preliminary results of the survey, in light of the realities of Latin America.

Who benefits from the silence? Freedom of expression and women human rights defenders in Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala

Daysi Flores on 5 Nov 2012
In this article, Daysi Flores, a JASS Mesoamérica representative and GenderIT.org contributor, looks at a number of new cybercrime laws in Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala that pose a threat to online security, the right to privacy, and freedom of expression and association for the countries’ citizens in general, but for women human rights defenders in particular.

Crossing borders : cyberspace and national security

Kateřina Fialová on 25 Oct 2012
This edition of GenderIT.org explores the online safety of women human rights defenders from the perspective of national security and counter-terrorism. National security often encompasses a variety of security threats, including those in cyberspace. While national security measures are meant to protect the security of a nation and its citizen, in many contexts they serve as a pretext for suppressing unfavourable political and social views. Despite the fact that online & offline security measures adversely impact on women's and sexual rights, women and sexual minorities are still two of the most invisible stakeholders in national security debates. This editions delves into some of these risks and examines explicitly messages that we have touched on before (that link this edition to previous one), particularly "why & how women human rights defenders can become players in the spaces that govern cyberspace":http://www.genderit.org/node/3684.

Let’s stop our fear of tech leading to misuse of security legislation

Danna Ingleton on 25 Oct 2012
I was very happy when I was asked to be guest editor of this edition of GenderIT.org on women human rights defenders (WHRD) and national cyber security policies. This is an important and timely issue for WHRDs because the misuse of counter-terrorism legislation to quell dissent and further marginalise minority voices is on the rise.

Surveying Women Human Rights Defenders: Harassment is the biggest online problem

Sonia Randhawa on 25 Oct 2012
The Association for Progressive Communications (APC)'s “Connect your rights: Internet rights are human rights” campaign has commissioned one of the first international surveys of the online threats faced by women human rights defenders (WHRDs). Responses came from 13 English-speaking countries, and across Spanish-speaking Latin America, with just over 40 people responding. The survey thus provides a starting point for looking at the threats, training needs and security concerns of WHRDs online.

Towards a cybersecurity strategy for global civil society?

Kateřina Fialová on 25 Oct 2012
This study lays out the elements of a comprehensive security strategy for cyberspace. It aims to address the cybersecurity threats that plague national, personal and social security while protecting and preserving open networks of information and communication. The study was published as part of Global Information Society Watch 2011 that investigated how governments and internet and mobile phone companies are restricting freedom online and how citizens are responding to this using the very same technologies.

Egypt: Cyber-security as a priority and an integral part of human rights advocacy

Mavic Cabrera-Balleza on 25 Oct 2012
GenderIT.org correspondent Mavic Cabrera-Balleza interviews Yara Sallam, Manager of the Women Human Rights Defenders Program at Nazra for Feminist Studies in Egypt, on the challenging reality for women human rights defenders, how they are affected by measures taken by the government in the name of “national security”, and strategies used to address threats to WHRD's cybersecurity.

Collateral damage of the cyberwar in Syria

Jennifer Radloff on 24 Oct 2012
Jennifer Radloff and Grady Johnson speak to a Syrian activist in exile about the government increasing tendency to securitize the internet and crack down freedom of expression and freedom to privacy on-line. They also talk how limited access to ICTs, self-censorship due to widespread surveillance and reliance on commercial social networks in combination with a general lack of technical knowledge jeopardise the work of women rights defenders in particular, and how they can avoid being caught in the crossfire.

Building the Capacity of WHRD: the experience of Front Line Defenders

Margarita Salas on 24 Oct 2012
In a context where the debate around digital security tends to be focused on national security and counter-terrorism measures, civil society faces the important challenge of claiming a space for women human rights defenders (WHRD). Margarita Salas of Genderit.org spoke with Wojtek Bogusz and Tara Madden of Front Line Defenders to discuss some of the key challenges they have identified in their work supporting WHRDs.

Conference Summary Report : Towards an effective and inclusive global counter-terrorism policy

Kateřina Fialová on 24 Oct 2012
Too often, counter-terrorism measures include a violation of human rights and place state security ahead of a broad-based definition of individual human security, which would include economic security, respect for human rights and freedom from disease. In this context, from October 20 - 23, 2011 Cordaid and the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) convened a conference of global civil society actors to develop a collaborative strategy for civil society engagement in implementing the UN Global Counter Terrorism Strategy.
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