whrds

Egypt: Cyber-security as a priority and an integral part of human rights advocacy

Mavic Cabrera-Balleza on 25 Oct 2012
GenderIT.org correspondent Mavic Cabrera-Balleza interviews Yara Sallam, Manager of the Women Human Rights Defenders Program at Nazra for Feminist Studies in Egypt, on the challenging reality for women human rights defenders, how they are affected by measures taken by the government in the name of “national security”, and strategies used to address threats to WHRD's cybersecurity.

Collateral damage of the cyberwar in Syria

Jennifer Radloff on 24 Oct 2012
Jennifer Radloff and Grady Johnson speak to a Syrian activist in exile about the government increasing tendency to securitize the internet and crack down freedom of expression and freedom to privacy on-line. They also talk how limited access to ICTs, self-censorship due to widespread surveillance and reliance on commercial social networks in combination with a general lack of technical knowledge jeopardise the work of women rights defenders in particular, and how they can avoid being caught in the crossfire.

Building the Capacity of WHRD: the experience of Front Line Defenders

Margarita Salas on 24 Oct 2012
In a context where the debate around digital security tends to be focused on national security and counter-terrorism measures, civil society faces the important challenge of claiming a space for women human rights defenders (WHRD). Margarita Salas of Genderit.org spoke with Wojtek Bogusz and Tara Madden of Front Line Defenders to discuss some of the key challenges they have identified in their work supporting WHRDs.

Conference Summary Report : Towards an effective and inclusive global counter-terrorism policy

Kateřina Fialová on 24 Oct 2012
Too often, counter-terrorism measures include a violation of human rights and place state security ahead of a broad-based definition of individual human security, which would include economic security, respect for human rights and freedom from disease. In this context, from October 20 - 23, 2011 Cordaid and the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) convened a conference of global civil society actors to develop a collaborative strategy for civil society engagement in implementing the UN Global Counter Terrorism Strategy.

Azerbaijan: When online security is synonymous with personal safety

Zooey Schock on 23 Oct 2012
The Seventh Internet Governance Forum will be taking place in Baku, Azerbaijan from 6 to 9 November 2012. GenderIT.org writer Zooey Schock spoke with veteran activist Dr Leyla Yunus about internet freedom and the ability to organise in post-Soviet Asia.

The hack of Uganda’s government websites: Anonymous could do better

on 27 Aug 2012
Uganda’s Government websites were hacked and defaced earlier this month. The hacksters asserted that their actions were to protest the Ugandan Government persecution of the LGBTI community of Uganda where being gay is considered criminal and where legislation is pending Uganda’s parliament that would impose harsh prison penalties on gay people, including the death sentence for so called “aggravated homosexuality.” Melanie Nathan, an activists who write extensively about LGBT Uganda, notes that the actions of Anonymous may have caused more harm than good to the Ugandan LGBT Community.

Statement: International Coalition Condemns Human Rights Violations Against W.O.N.E.T.H.A

WHRD IC on 1 Aug 2012
The Women Human Rights Defenders International Coalition (WHRD IC) has expressed deep concern regarding the safety of five staff from the Uganda sex worker organization, Women’s Organization Network for Human Rights Advocacy (WONETHA). On May 7, police authorities raided WONETHA's small office and arrested two staff and three members. The staff members face ongoing harassment and criminal charges. This is among others an attack on WONETHA and sex workers' freedom of association, assembly, speech and expression.

It's violent, it's misogynist. Something needs to be done, but what?

Sonia Randhawa on 16 Jul 2012
For those of you that don't know the appalling vitriol that Anita Sarkeesian has been subject to, you can read a summary of it <a href="http://www.newstatesman.com/blogs/internet/2012/07/what-online-harassment-looks">here</a>. It's worrying that there are people out there who are capable of perpetrating this campaign of hatred. But what's more worrying is that we don't seem to know what to do about it.

Going online is the same as going out to a rally

Kateřina Fialová on 13 Jun 2012
In early April 2012 in Istanbul thirty people from six continents met at the APC “Dialogue on digital security and women's human rights defenders” to discuss regional and global trends on digital security, freedom of expression and freedom of association, and their impact on women's human rights defenders. Katerina Fialova and Sonia Randhawa interviewed two of the participants to interrogate/ talk about/find out more about key digital security issues that women's human rights defenders face, and how human rights organisations can collaboratively address these threads.

Digital Security: Drop-in centre of Ugandan sex worker organisation raided

on 17 May 2012
“Sex work may be illegal in Uganda, but providing services for sex workers is clearly not,” reads a statement put out on May 9 by WONETHA, a health and human rights organisation, in reaction to a serious crack-down on its activities by Ugandan municipal police.

Filtered by the state, inspired by Gita Sen

hvale on 19 Apr 2012
Today Gita Sen said “we are in a fierce vicious unequal new economic world where battlegrounds are many” and a few hours later in the session on “Commodification of knowledge: how increasing access and availability of the internet had transformed the way knowledge is produced and shared” a participant made us notice that “We were being watched." And it's true behind the gorgeous beauty of Istanbul there is a state that filters access to the net, a state that does not allow sites to be displayed if they use “certain” words or images.

Anonymize yourself: digital security and feminist practice of technology

hvale on 19 Apr 2012
As the day passed I saw myself surrendering to the fact that there is nothing good in the laziness of a routine that prevent us from thinking about technological abuse that we as women activists can suffer and make the other suffering. When on the 18 we had the feminist tech exchange I understood that I need, I have to anonymize myself.

Women's human rights online & the Universal Periodic Review

Kateřina Fialová on 5 Apr 2012
From 21 May to 4 June 2012, the second cycle of the Human Rights Council's Universal Periodic Review (UPR) will begin at the UN Office at Geneva. The UPR is a unique mechanism for states and governments to tell other countries what they have achieved in promoting human rights – but also for non-state actors to raise issues of concern in a non-confrontational fashion. This edition of GenderIT.org will allow you to learn more about the current discussions about women's human rights on the internet, with a particular focus on the submission of country reports for Brazil, Ecuador and Phillipines for the UPR process made by APC and their partners. These reports raise for the first time that internet-related women's human rights issues as part of the UPR.

Daysi Flores: SOME THOUGHTS AROUND ... Discovering worlds and sharing resistances online

Daysi Flores on 5 Apr 2012
A girl growing up in the 80s in Central America, in Honduras, who went to state schools had few chances to access any type of technology. It was even difficult for us to access books as a source of knowledge, and letters were a form of communication to which only some of us had access. All of the music - other than the music that my mother listened to - was only available in English...

Submission to the UPR: Women’s access to justice in the Philippines

on 4 Apr 2012
The submission to the UPR process elaborated by the Women´s Legal and Human Rights Bureau, Inc from the Philippines addresses the issue of women’s access to justice in the country, which highlights technology-related violence against women (VAW) as an emerging form of VAW. The submission also looks at the gaps and challenges in available domestic remedies to survivors of violence and abuse against women online, criticizing that existing laws on VAW do not guarantee the prosecution of technology-related VAW. It further highlights the importance of women’s access to the internet and their representation in policy processes as integral to their right to access to justice.
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