Fighting the backlash: Moving the agenda forward at the CSW

Flavia Fascendini on 6 April 2014 | 4,382 views
The 58th session of the Commission on the Status of Women was held in New York from 10 to 21 March 2014. While there were strategic moves forward in relation to ICTs and tech-related violence against women, the APC Women's Rights Programme discuss both the highlights and the frustrations the women's movement faces in pushing the women's rights agenda forward.

CSW58: "We need to move beyond agreements towards public policies that will fulfil the commitments made to women"

Florencia Flores Iborra on 3 April 2014 | 3,790 views
The 58th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) took place from 10 to 21 March 2014 at the United Nations headquarters in New York. “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and girls" was this year's priority theme. The participation of women's organisations in CSW sessions provides an opportunity for delegations to highlight and promote the incorporation of specific gender equity goals. After many years of work, women's organisations have achieved a voice of their own at these meetings. But participation is not enough. Holding governments accountable to the effective implementation of the commitmentsthey signed onto, is the new challenge. To analyse these and other questions, writer Florencia Flores Iborra spoke with Dafne Sabanes Plou, who participated in CSW 58 and shared her views on the issues discussed during the session.

Alberto Cerda: "There are many more international agreements to protect intellectual property than to protect people's privacy"

erika on 2 April 2014 | 3,494 views
Alberto Cerda is the international affairs director at Derechos Digitales, a Chilean NGO, and a specialist in intellectual property and privacy issues. In this interview, he analyses the legislation and policies being adopted in Latin America to deal with online violence against women involving the invasion of privacy, and the responsibility assigned to internet intermediaries and individuals.

"We have to gain more ground with human rights advocacy organizations": Interview with Vanessa Coria Castilla of Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights

Florencia Flores Iborra on 1 December 2013 | 4,642 views
On September 21st the website of the "Health Network of Latin American and Caribbean Women” (RSMLAC: Red de Salud de las Mujeres Latinoamericanas y del Caribe) was attacked and taken down. This attack occurred immediately after the launch of several activities related to #28SAbortoLegal, the September 28th social media campaign to legalise abortion. In this special issue, working with our partner Florencia Flores Iborra, we interview various actors, authoritative voices who help us think about the current dimensions of internet violence targeting women human rights defenders. In this first installment, and as a special interview for, Vanessa Coria Castilla, Director of Programs and Advocacy for the Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights (WGNRR), shared some thoughts on the persecution faced by women's organizations globally, and particularly in Latin America.

"If we don't stop these attacks, we run the risk of being left without a voice": Interview with Sandra Castañeda Martínez of RSMLAC

Florencia Flores Iborra on 1 December 2013 | 4,818 views
The attack on the Health Network of Latin American and Caribbean Women (RSMLAC: Red Salud de las Mujeres Latinoamericanas y del Caribe) website confirms that we need to constantly defend the rights of women. Here, in a special interview for, we talk with Sandra Castañeda Martínez, general coordinator of the RSMLAC, who helps us visualize the scale of violence on the internet today.

Korea: Women’s privacy in danger through surveillance and leaking of private information

Shehla Rashid on 27 November 2013 | 4,285 views
“Digitising social welfare: Challenges of privacy” GISWatch report from Korea points out instances where women in the country have leveraged even non-political internet forums to discuss socio-political issues and to organise offline on crucial issues. However, it also highlights several government policies that expose women to privacy violations and related abuse. In particular, it points out the various dangers involved in the government’s collection of personal information from survivors of domestic violence, sexual abuse, forced prostitution, etc. The report also highlights the privacy violation of women workers in care professions due to high surveillance. Shehla Rashid Shora speaks to the author Yeo-Kyung Chang, who works with Jinbonet, about the state of women’s internet usage in South Korea.

Jamaican household workers use cell phones to protect their rights and improve the working conditions

Flavia Fascendini on 27 November 2013 | 5,960 views
Leith Dunn and Hopeton Dunn from the Institute for Gender and Development Studies Mona Unit, and Mona ICT Policy Centre, at the University of the West Indies, are the authors of the Global Information Society Watch article entitled “Women’s rights, gender and ICTs: Empowering household workers in Jamaica”. In this interview they told why they chose this subject, how the sector of household workers is using mobile phones to improve their working conditions, and the role ICT policies and legislation have played to enable this advancement.

Cook Islands: Pushing for women leaders

Analía Lavin on 27 November 2013 | 3,868 views
The Global Information Society Watch Cook Islands report was released, written by Maureen Hilyard, Alexis Wolfgramm and Lynnsay Rongokea from the Pan Pacific and Southeast Asia Women’s Association. Analía Lavin interviewed Maureen Hilyard, one of the authors, on the main issues women face online, on gender equality in the political system, and on the role of the media.