Gender Assessments and Research

Gendering Surveillance

GenderIT.org on 23 May 2017
Surveillance powers of the state and corporations are escalating and are hugely assisted by information technology. Under regimes of colonialism and patriarchy, women, minorities and all other subjects have experienced being surveilled, enumerated and categorised. There is a need to now relook at how gender is implicated in surveillance practices in the contemporary. In this resource, Internet Democracy Project introduces a conceptual understanding of gender and surveillance, and 3 cases studies on mobile phones and access, safety apps for women and CCTV camera on women garment workers.

Big Data and Sexual Surveillance

on 23 Jan 2017
Surveillance has historically functioned as an oppressive tool to control women’s bodies and is closely related to colonial modes of managing populations. Big data, metadata and the technologies used to collect, store and analyse them are by no means neutral, but come with their own exclusions and biases. This paper highlights the gendered and racialised effects of data practices; outlines the overlapping nature of state, commercial and peer surveillance; and maps the challenges and opportunities women and queers encounter on the nexus between data, surveillance, gender and sexuality.

ARROW for Change: Sexuality, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Internet

GenderIT.org on 7 Dec 2016
What are the relationships and interdependencies influencing the promises of being online: voice, visibility, and power? This ARROW for Change (AFC) issue on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and the internet documents some of these dynamics.

Use of mobile phones by the rural poor; Gender perspectives from selected Asian countries

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 4 Jul 2016
Acknowledging the differences in perceptions between genders, and between urban and rural dwellers, what must be realized is that these differences are often not unique to aspects related to the mobile phone. The concerns, needs, and benefits ascribed to the mobile phone are more a reflection of people’s existing societal, familial, and gender norms prevalent in their environments, rather than having been elicited by the mobile phone. From the perception of the study participants, the phone is an enabler of extant human need and desire.

Mexico: Exploring technology-related violence against women

APC on 22 Nov 2015
The report "From impunity to justice: Exploring technology-related violence against women in Mexico" reflects research carried out in Mexico between November 2013 and April 2014. Comprising an in-depth analysis of four case studies, a mapping of the socio-legal landscape, and an assessment of the policies of internet and telephony companies, the report highlights women’s voices and provides a series of recommendations to better address the issue of technology-related violence against women in Mexico.

End violence: Women's rights and technology-related violence in Colombia

Colnodo on 22 Nov 2015
This report describes research carried out by Colnodo in Colombia between February and May 2014 as part of an Association for Progressive Communications (APC) project covering seven countries, titled End violence: Women's rights and safety online.

Analysis of incidents reported on the “Take Back the Tech!” Ushahidi platform

Kateřina Fialová on 9 Sep 2015
This report provides an overview of data concerning violence against women (VAW) online collected using the Association for Progressive Communications' (APC) online mapping tool. The purpose of the mapping tool, which was set up as part of APC's “End Violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project, was to improve APC’s existing framework for categorising online rights violations, and develop a deeper understanding of the nature and consequences of technology-related VAW. This report is intended primarily as a quantitative overview of the cases reported, with some qualitative illustration. The data is analysed from 2012 to mid-2014.

Research design: Exploring corporate and state remedies for technology-related violence against women

Kateřina Fialová on 9 Sep 2015
Between April 2013 and June 2014, the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) carried out a multi-country research entitled „From impunity to justice“ as the part of its project End violence: Women's rights and safety online. The research involved the collection of case studies that highlight the voices and experiences of women from the global south who have faced technology-related VAW. The research design document outlines theoretical framework, research methodology, and instruments used in the research.

Bosnia and Herzegovina: Exploring technology-related violence against women

OneWorldSEE on 30 Aug 2015
This report emerges from research carried out in Bosnia and Herzegovina between July 2013 and April 2014 by One World Platform for South East Europe (OWPSEE) and the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) as part of a seven-country project entitled “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online”.

The 'Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society' research: Final meeting report

Kateřina Fialová on 10 Apr 2012
The final meeting of the ‘Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society’(CITIGEN) research network was organized by IT for Change in Bangalore in February 2012. The CITIGEN research programme studies whether marginalised women benefit from new information and communication technologies and whether the internet and mobile phones strengthened their active citizenship. The final meeting of the CITIGEN programme was an occasion for the network members and partners to take stock of the work done and to reflect upon the questions framing the research endeavour.

Critically absent: Women in internet governance. A policy advocacy toolkit

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 3 Apr 2012
The women's movement has always had the ability to make the invisible visible and grant it a political character. This toolkit encourages women and their organisations to engage in political discussions regarding internet development with a vision of inclusion, fairness and respect for women's rights. The authors' vision is that the toolkit be used to raise awareness and encourage participation in a new environment where women cannot and should not be absent.

EROTICS: Sex, rights and the internet - an exploratory research study

Jac sm Kee on 9 Aug 2011
How is the internet a key public sphere for the struggle for sexual citizenship and the exercise of sexual rights? What is its value to a diversity of users, especially those most marginalised or discriminated against because of their sexual, gender or other forms of social identity? Why do arguments for the regulation of the internet anchor on the moral imperative to regulate sexuality? Who are the key actors influencing processes of decision making, and what are the ways in which the potentially liberatory impact of the internet is being constricted and narrowed? The 3 year EROTICS research project delves into the complex world of sexuality and internet regulation, and uncovers interesting insights to these questions from Brazil, India, Lebanon, South Africa and the US. The full research findings and a synthesis chapter is presented in this report.

Pakistan: Violence against Women and ICT

Kateřina Fialová on 29 Mar 2011
Access to mobile technology is increasing rapidly in Pakistan, and women are also gaining access, albeit at a slower rate than men. Kyla Pasha examines how mobile technology is ripe for use in strategies of empowerment, as long as access to technology is accompanied by training and orientation.

EROTICS: Exploratory research on sexuality and the internet - summary report

Jac sm Kee on 16 Feb 2011
What is the value of the internet in the exercise of sexual rights? From 2008 to 2010, the EROTICS research sought to answer this question, aiming to bridge the gap between policy and legislative measures that regulate content and practice on the internet, and the actual lived practices, experiences and concerns of internet users in the exercise of their sexual rights. The summary report provides an overview of the research, and surfaces the key areas of concern, interest and findings of five national studies in Brazil, India, Lebanon, South Africa and the United States. They give a compelling glimpse into the richness of the research universe, and the complexity of the subject.

Because I am a girl: Digital and urban frontiers 2010

Kateřina Fialová on 16 Feb 2011
The report focuses on the lives of adolescents in two of the current scenarios of faster growth: the urban environment and the digital world. Both have new opportunities for girls and young women but also risks that have hardly been investigated and regulated. Prejudice and poverty exclude millions of girls from taking advantages of the transformative possibilities that cities and information and ICTs can offer. The 2010 'Because I am a Girl' brings lots of exciting examples from around the world that ICTs open up for girls in terms of learning, networking, campaigning and personal development, such as girls tweeting to amplify their voices in global discussions on women’s rights. The report has also interesting and context specific recommendations on how to enhance girls access to science and technology.
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