Resources

This publication by Women Peacemakers Program (WPP) is a testimony to the increasing number of people — women and men — who are challenging the norms bestowed upon us. They are linking the dots and showing us how militarization is coming at us from many angles — including entering the private sphere through IT and financial services. This reality not only requires activists to enter new domains of work; it simultaneously urges us all to keep on pushing for a transformative agenda in all these spaces, if real peace and security is to have a chance.
A recent report, “Internet intermediaries and violence against women online” released by the Association for Progressive Communications for the “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project, analyses the policies and redress framework of the three major internet intermediaries: Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, in regard to violence against women online. These case studies allow APC to further its progress by creating a bridge between social networking platforms and policymakers by analyzing and addressing concerns found in the intermediaries’ online policies and responses to issues of VAW.
This review of related studies and literature forms part of the legal remedy research which falls under the "End violence: Women's rights and safety online" (EndVAW) flagship project of the Association for Progressive Communications (APC). The project is to be implemented from 2012 to 2015 with support from the Dutch government’s Funding Leadership and Opportunities for Women (FLOW) programme.
Read Everjoice Win's timely critical analysis of the Southern African regional context through a feminist lens. Everything from the rise of the prosperity gospel and its impact on discourse about sex, sexuality and women's bodies to the complex legacies of the sub-continent’s liberation struggles and new faces of militarism. With an in-depth focus on Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe (the three countries in which JASS supports work), "Between Jesus, the Generals and the Invisibles" is a razor-sharp snapshot of the region, its dynamics and trends as well as opportunities and challenges for feminist movement building and women's rights agendas.
AWID, in collaboration with members of the Women Human Rights Defenders International Coalition, has developed this publication in an effort to assess the various mechanisms developed to provide protection to WHRDs at risk, including initiatives developed by national governments, and regional and international human rights bodies. The publication counts with a specific section addressing digital security and freedom of expression issues.
The 18th edition of the Feminist Africa journal offers a unique perspective to independent public discourse on the implications of global digitisation, presenting African perspectives that emerge from feminist praxis across the continent. In this edition, Jennifer Radloff, Jan Moolman, Jac sm Kee and Caroline Tagny from the APC Women's Rights Programme contribute to the debate with insights on internet rights, sexual rights and technology-related violence against women.
Social Media Etiquette or netiquette is essentially a loose and continuously evolving set of rules governing online communication behavior. It addresses maintaining one’s own and others’ dignity, respect and privacy. As in ofine behavior, abiding by etiquette and ethics online pays off in the long run.
Social networks are increasingly being used as a tool for identity theft, stalking, harassment, invasion of privacy, and other forms of violence. Sexual predators are also using these tools to their advantage. With increased penetration of the internet and mobile telephony, Pakistan is no different in this respect, with the role of these technologies being used for purposes of crime and violence expanding at an alarming rate. This booklet aims to dene different forms of online violence, provide tips on how to help prevent cyber violence and crime, and reporting as a measure to obtain remedy.