Resources

This joint submission has been prepared by the APC Women’s Networking Support Programme in consultation with Instituto Nupef and is endorsed by Sexuality Policy Watch. The submission focuses on human rights and the internet in Brazil. It highlights areas where Brazil is doing well, specific areas of concern, and makes five recommendations for follow-up and implementation. The submission focuses on the women’s human rights to sexual and reproductive health information and citizens’ rights to free expression and privacy.
APC’s submission for Ecuador to the UPR process, with support from CIESPAL and Radialistas Apasionadas y Apasionados, focuses on issues of access to the internet and highlights the critical importance of the internet for human rights, as well as social and economic development. Although the first UPR of Ecuador did not include reference to internet-related human rights issues, the events of 2011 showed that the UPR must include the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms on the internet, particularly freedom of expression and freedom of association.
The women's movement has always had the ability to make the invisible visible and grant it a political character. This toolkit encourages women and their organisations to engage in political discussions regarding internet development with a vision of inclusion, fairness and respect for women's rights. The authors' vision is that the toolkit be used to raise awareness and encourage participation in a new environment where women cannot and should not be absent.
Drawing on findings from APC's MDG3: Take Back the Tech! project with women's rights organisations in twelve countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, this paper explores the links between the internet, cell phones and violence against women and illustrates that technology related violence impacts women as seriously as other forms of violence.
Drawing on findings from APC's MDG3: Take Back the Tech! project with women's rights organisations in twelve countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, this paper explores the links between the internet, cell phones and violence against women and illustrates that technology related violence impacts women as seriously as other forms of violence.
In this submission to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights to Freedom of Peaceful Assembly, Association for Progressive Communication (APC) acknowledges the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and association to be together with the right to freedom of expression at the core of a democratic and open society and makes recommendations for how these rights can be promoted and protected online.
The Take Back the Tech! Be Safe website section offers tips and ideas on steps women and girls can take to make their online experiences safer. It addresses security issues regarding privacy (emails, online chats, password protection, mobile phones), prevention of cyberstalking or secure online browsing.
This mapping platform is part of the Take Back the Tech! campaign, and provides a space for the documenting and monitoring of experiences and stories of women and girls who faced violence against women (VAW) online or through the use of mobile phone technologies. The interactive map monitors technology-related VAW according to five broad categories: the type of VAW, the act of violation (what the abuser or violator did), the harm faced by twomen survivors, the technology platform which was implicated or used in the incidence of VAW, and the level of familiarity or involvement with the abuser or violator. In collaboration with the local campaigners, the map operates in 10 languages, including French, Spanish, Bosnian, Lugandan, Arabic, Urdu and Portuguese.
The Gender Dynamic Coalition statement issued during the 6th UN Internet Governance Forum in September 2011, in Kenya, criticises the continued gender imbalance in both participation (as speakers and participants of workshops and sessions) and substance of the discussions at IGF. It also supports the call to make human rights the IGF 2012 theme and requests that equal attention be paid to women's rights, emphasising the need of a rights-based approach instead of protectionist solutions.