Resources

“Strategising Online Activism: A Toolkit” was designed for and by women activists but can be used by everyone. Key chapters include: strategising and planning your online activism; creating your campaign’s identity; social networking and security on the internet. vioThe guide provides practical and accessible step-by-step advice, while keeping a political and feminist eye. It was developed by APC’s women’s programme (APC WNSP) and our partner Violence is Not our Culture (VNC).
The Commentary to the Declaration on Human Rights Defenders maps the rights protected in the Declaration and explains in what parts of the document are they protected, unpacks what each right entails and which are the common restrictions and violations of those rights, and lastly highlights good practices and recommendations regarding those rights. It pays particular attention to the specifics of the situation of women human rights defenders and the particular challenges they face, The guide is based mostly on information received and reports produced by the institute of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders.
This self-help manual written by Marina Bernal and others with the collaboration of Artemisa, Elige and CREA, proposes to feminist activists to undertake a journey of self-exploration in order to learn to build their own self-defense strategies. It aims to help activists understand their limitations and strengths, as well as reasons why they are victims of certain types of violence and why they react in one way or the other when faced with it.
This report prepared by Inmaculada Barcia in 2011 for the Association for Women's Rights in Development (AWID) is a resource specifically designed for women human rights defenders. It maps the diverse responses and specific measures currently being offered to protect women defenders from governments, as well as from non-governmental sectors. The Report also recognizes and evaluates the effects of international pressure and visibility (urgent appeals, working with international and regional mechanisms, sponsorship programs, awards, solidarity and monitoring visits, trial observation), resources for local action (legal assistance, medical and psychosocial counselling, stress management programs, safe houses, among others) and support for relocation and other grants.
This Declaration recognises the legitimacy of human rights work and the need for these activities and those who carry them out to be protected. It articulates existing rights contained in the major human rights instruments, such as the right to freedom of expression, association and assembly, as they apply to the situation of human rights defenders. It also outlines that not only States, but also non-State actors (such as corporations and “fundamentalist” groups), have the duty to protect human rights defenders against any violence, retaliation and intimidation as a consequence of their human rights work.
What is sexual content on the internet? What are sexuality and sexual rights? Which communications rights are critical for people's sexual rights? What are the most common threats to people's sexual rights? What are some of the methods and impacts of censorship of "sexual content" on the internet? These and other issues are highlighted by the media brief published by APC as part of the EroTICs research.
How is the internet a key public sphere for the struggle for sexual citizenship and the exercise of sexual rights? What is its value to a diversity of users, especially those most marginalised or discriminated against because of their sexual, gender or other forms of social identity? Why do arguments for the regulation of the internet anchor on the moral imperative to regulate sexuality? Who are the key actors influencing processes of decision making, and what are the ways in which the potentially liberatory impact of the internet is being constricted and narrowed? The 3 year EROTICS research project delves into the complex world of sexuality and internet regulation, and uncovers interesting insights to these questions from Brazil, India, Lebanon, South Africa and the US. The full research findings and a synthesis chapter is presented in this report.
This paper assesses the impact of a social outsourcing initiative operated by the government of Kerala State, India. Part of this outsources information technology (IT) services to dozens of cooperatives of women from below-poverty-line families in order to improve their socio-economic status. While raising questions about sustainability of the initiative, the research finds that social outsourcing has delivered new jobs, incomes and empowerment into low-income communities.
The report collects inputs from the workshop organized by IT for Change in April 2011 in New Delhi. The workshop was the part of Asia-wide research programme 'Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society (CITIGEN)' and brought together researchers, scholars and practitioners to share their views on democracy and women's participation, new articulations of citizenship in the information society and other issues at stake. The CITIGEN programme seeks to inform policy and practice through research and focuses on five thematic areas: local resistance and global solidarities; emancipation and the neo-liberal feminine subject; gender and public discourse in the emerging public spheres; new paradigms of local governance and participatory development; and technology governance and gender politics.