Resources

APC calls on states to brings attention to emerging threats to women's freedom of expression and emerging forms of violence on the internet that impact on women's rights.The Statement is part of a set of recommendations submitted to the Human Rights Council in preparation for its seventeenth regular session (30 May – 17 June 2011).
This document defines ten key rights and principles recommended to form the basis of internet governance. They have been compiled by the Internet Rights and Principles Dynamic Coalition (IRP), an open network of individuals and organisations working to uphold human rights in the Internet environment. The principles are rooted in international human rights standards, and derive from the coalition's emerging Charter of Human Rights and Principles for the Internet.
First developed in 2001-2002 by APC members and partner organisations at Internet Rights workshops held in Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa and updated in 2006, the APC Internet Rights Charter enshrines the rights of people and organisations to use the internet freely, particularly in their work for social, economic and environmental justice. The Charter refers specifically to the internet; however, these principles are relevant to all other information and communication technologies (ICTs), including telephone, radio, and others.
APC calls on states to repeal laws which criminalise online freedom of expression and to cease interference with freedom of expression by means which violate international human rights standards. The Statement emphasises that women’s human rights must be respected and protected and their rights to freedom of expression and association must not be restricted. The Statement is part of a set of recommendations submitted to the Human Rights Council in preparation for its seventeenth regular session (30 May – 17 June 2011).
The UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression's report explores key trends and challenges to the right of all individuals to seek, receive and impart information and ideas of all kinds through the internet. The Report underscores the unique and transformative nature of the Internet but also outlines the growing global trend of restricting freedom of expression and association online.
Access to mobile technology is increasing rapidly in Pakistan, and women are also gaining access, albeit at a slower rate than men. Kyla Pasha examines how mobile technology is ripe for use in strategies of empowerment, as long as access to technology is accompanied by training and orientation.
The outcome of the Commission’s consideration of the priority theme takes the form of agreed conclusions, negotiated by all States. These identify gaps and challenges in the implementation of previous commitments. They also provide action-oriented recommendations for all States, relevant non-governmental bodies, mechanisms and entities of the UN System and other relevant stakeholders, in order to accelerate implementation.
Jan Moolman facilitates the Questions & Answers session at the "Take Back The Tech! Reclaiming technology for women's rights" event at the 55th Commission on the Status of Women, on 25 February 2011.
Jac sm Kee talks about the Take Back The Tech! campaign, as well as introduces the Erotics - Exploratory Research on Sexuality and the Internet - project. Jac presents examples from Brazil, Lebanon, India and South Africa illustrating how the queer movement is using the internet for mobilising and for the exercise of sexual rights. She also explains how the Take Back The Tech! campaign connects violence against women and ICTs, and engages users to take control of technology to end violence against women. This presentation was part of the "Take Back The Tech! Reclaiming technology for women's rights" session at the 55th Commission on the Status of Women, on 25 February 2011.