Resources

Harriet Musoke presents the work of Isis-Women’s International Cross Cultural Exchange (Isis-WICCE) and their approach to technology in addressing violence in post-conflict situation. Isis-WICCE is one of more than sixty groups funded by 'Take Back the Tech! small grants' fund, and using information technologies in their work to end violence against women. This presentation was part of the "Take Back The Tech! Reclaiming technology for women's rights" session at the 55th Commission on the Status of Women, on 25 February 2011.
Dafne Plou presents on how dozens of Feminist Technology Exchanges - a series of capacity building workshops - are building the skills of women's rights organisations to use information and communication technologies in campaigning, monitoring and documentation to end violence against women. This presentation was part of the "Take Back The Tech! Reclaiming technology for women's rights" session at the 55th Commission on the Status of Women, on 25 February 2011.
How many times have you received a forwarded message that contains photographs or a video of someone being violated or humiliated? What do you do with it? The action “I Don't Forward Violence” calls on internet and mobile phone users to take action to create an online and offline culture that does not tolerate misogynist or violent images of women and girls. It was launched by APC WNSP in February 2011 under the Take Back the Tech! campaign
The three-part video campaign STOP MOTION PROJECT – When does the violence begin? aims to encourage discussion and promote awareness on violence against women through creative storytelling and the use of stop-motion animation. The mission of STOP MOTION PROJECT is to empower and support organisations and individuals in and through the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for the purpose of ending violence against women (VAW).
What is the value of the internet in the exercise of sexual rights? From 2008 to 2010, the EROTICS research sought to answer this question, aiming to bridge the gap between policy and legislative measures that regulate content and practice on the internet, and the actual lived practices, experiences and concerns of internet users in the exercise of their sexual rights. The summary report provides an overview of the research, and surfaces the key areas of concern, interest and findings of five national studies in Brazil, India, Lebanon, South Africa and the United States. They give a compelling glimpse into the richness of the research universe, and the complexity of the subject.
The report focuses on the lives of adolescents in two of the current scenarios of faster growth: the urban environment and the digital world. Both have new opportunities for girls and young women but also risks that have hardly been investigated and regulated. Prejudice and poverty exclude millions of girls from taking advantages of the transformative possibilities that cities and information and ICTs can offer. The 2010 'Because I am a Girl' brings lots of exciting examples from around the world that ICTs open up for girls in terms of learning, networking, campaigning and personal development, such as girls tweeting to amplify their <br />voices in global discussions on women’s rights. The report has also interesting and context specific recommendations on how to enhance girls access to science and technology.
This briefing relies on new research into how new technologies are being used by abusers and by women fighting back. The cases were uncovered in research commissioned by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) in 12 developing countries in 2009, unless an additional website reference is included.
16 slides x 16 seconds idea follows the Pecha-Kucha presentation format which is 20 x 20 - we've adapted it to 16 for the 16 days of activism against gender violence. It draw the story of how violence against women (VAW) and ICTs link together in Cambodia. The presentation highlights top 3 VAW issues for Cambodian women - domestic violence, rape, and human trafficking. It also unfold how ICTs are used by abusers as well as local anti-vaw movement.
In Congo, Sylvie Niombo explores the intersection of VAW and ICTs, where mobile phone use appears to be the primary vehicle used to perpetrate VAW using ICTs. SMS and phone calls are used by some men to harass women and girls. Male monitoring of women’s use of mobile phones leads to blurring of privacy issues and power relations between men and women are reflected by who has the resources to buy cell phones. Mobile phones are also used by young people to disseminate pictures of naked girls.