Resources

The blockade of LGBTIQ websites by several Internet Service Providers (ISP) has been happening since 2011. The act is often a one-sided decision without prior notification to owner of website. In response to such situation, in 2012, LGBTIQ activists began advocating Human Rights of LGBTIQ in the area of internet management. These activists include Institut Pelangi Perempuan (IPP), Ourvoice (OV), Arus Pelangi and Gamacca. The social movement and process of advocacy against cyber-homophobia and the decision to close LGBTIQ websites in Indonesia then become a movement introduced as “Queering Internet Governance in Indonesia.”
Tactical Tech is delighted to announce the launch of a new guide: Tools and Tactics for the LGBTI community in sub-Saharan Africa. This is the second in our series of Security in-a-box Community Focus guides, which aim to further integrate digital security into the context of particular communities and human rights defenders.
This study seeks to explore recent legislative developments aimed at addressing and providing avenues of redress for technology-related violence against women. We explore the objectives, structure and application of four domestic legislative responses to different forms of violence against women, seeking to understand how domestic legislatures are responding to increasing awareness of violence against women online.
The following case summaries are excerpted from End violence against women: Country reports, which involve seven countries and are part of research commissioned by the Association for Progressive Communications Women's Rights Programme (APC WRP) beginning in 2013.
On 7 July 2014, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) held a General Discussion on the Right to Education for Girls and Women, the aim of which is to commence the Committee’s process of elaborating a “General Recommendation on girls’/women’s right to education.” These are the recommendations submitted by APC.
This publication by Women Peacemakers Program (WPP) is a testimony to the increasing number of people — women and men — who are challenging the norms bestowed upon us. They are linking the dots and showing us how militarization is coming at us from many angles — including entering the private sphere through IT and financial services. This reality not only requires activists to enter new domains of work; it simultaneously urges us all to keep on pushing for a transformative agenda in all these spaces, if real peace and security is to have a chance.
A recent report, “Internet intermediaries and violence against women online” released by the Association for Progressive Communications for the “End violence: Women’s rights and safety online” project, analyses the policies and redress framework of the three major internet intermediaries: Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, in regard to violence against women online. These case studies allow APC to further its progress by creating a bridge between social networking platforms and policymakers by analyzing and addressing concerns found in the intermediaries’ online policies and responses to issues of VAW.
This review of related studies and literature forms part of the legal remedy research which falls under the "End violence: Women's rights and safety online" (EndVAW) flagship project of the Association for Progressive Communications (APC). The project is to be implemented from 2012 to 2015 with support from the Dutch government’s Funding Leadership and Opportunities for Women (FLOW) programme.
Read Everjoice Win's timely critical analysis of the Southern African regional context through a feminist lens. Everything from the rise of the prosperity gospel and its impact on discourse about sex, sexuality and women's bodies to the complex legacies of the sub-continent’s liberation struggles and new faces of militarism. With an in-depth focus on Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe (the three countries in which JASS supports work), "Between Jesus, the Generals and the Invisibles" is a razor-sharp snapshot of the region, its dynamics and trends as well as opportunities and challenges for feminist movement building and women's rights agendas.